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Full text of "The records of living officers of the U. S. navy and Marine corps: with a history of naval operations during the rebellion of 1861-5, and a list of the ships and officers participating in the great battles"

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http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924098819968 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 




In compliance with current 

copyright law, Cornell University 

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replacement volume on paper 

that meets the ANSI Standard 

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Jttjara. Sfem ^orb 



BERNARD ALBERT SINN 

COLLECTION 

NAVAL HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY 

THE GIFT OF 

BERNARD A. SINN, '97 

1919 



THE EECOEDS 



LIVING OFFICERS 



U. S. MYY AID MARmE CORPS; 



WITH A HISTOUT OP 



NAVAL OPERATIONS DURING THE REBELLION OF 1861-5, 



A LIST OF THE SHIPS AND OFFICERS PARTICIPATING 
IN THE GREAT BATTLES. 

COMPILED FEOM OFFICIAL SOURCES 
BY 

Lewis R. Hameesly, 

(Late Lieutenant United States Marine Corps.) 



PHILADELPHIA: 
J. B. LIPPINOOTT & OO. 

187 0. 



^? 



V 

"> 



A ^ ■-: I'j % A, '-^ 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by 
L. R. HameesI/Y and F. R. Haebahgh, 

In the Clerk'a Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania. 



TO 

THE OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED STATES NAVY AND 

MARINE CORPS IS EESPECTFUILT DEDICATED THIS 

RECORD OF THEIR SERVICES, AND HISTORY OF THE WARFARE, 

WHICH THEIR VALOR AND PATRIOTISM SO MUCH 

AIDED, WITH DIVINE HELP, TO 

MAKE GLORIOUSLY 

SUCCESSFUL. 



Philadelphia, Febetjaey, 1870. 



Navy Depaktment, 

11th January, 1870. 
Dear Sib ; 

I have examined tbe proof sheets of your work on the Records of the 
Living Officers of the Navy, and am of opinion that it will supply a want, and 
be a useful book to the service and to the country. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

GEORGE M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Lewis R. Hamerslt, Esq., 

Editor of the Records of Living Officers. 



Navy Department, 

Washington, January 11th, 1870. 

This seems to be a concise statement of the services of the Living Officers 
of the Navy, as shown by the records of this Department. 

D. D. PORTER, 

Vice Admiral. 



PREFACE. 



The late Rebellion, wHeh elicited so much impulsive valor and such well- 
applied skill, found the United States almost without an army and navy. We 
had only 16,000 regular troops, dispersed over a wide expanse of territory, and 
only 94 war vessels of all classes, designed to carry 2,415 guns. Only 43 of 
these ships were in commission. Many of these had been sent to distant seas : 
so, for the defence of our whole Atlantic seaboard the sole available force was 
the Brooklyn, of 25, and the store-ship Relief, of 2 guns. Of seamen and 
marines there were only 7,000. The military deficiency was supplied by a vol- 
unteer force; a navy had to be created. Six hundred vessels were provided, 
which not only maintained a strict blockade for four years, from the Capes of the 
Chesapeake to the Rio Grande, but captured blockade-runners, chiefly with 
British owners, to the value of $30,000,000. Over 200 war ships were con- 
structed, and 418 merchant vessels, (of which 313 were steamers,) were converted 
into ships-of-war. Mechanical skill, developed by encouragement, greatly im- 
proved the ordnance and produced the Monitor, which rendered such unexpected 
and efficient service at. a most critical time. Our soldiers were nobly supported 
in the great contest, not alone at Mobile, Pensacola, Key West, along the Florida 
Coast, Charleston, Fortress Monroe, and Norfolk, but even at Forts Henry and 
Donelson, Shiloh, and, along the Mississippi river, especially at Vicksburg, Port 
Hudson, and New Orleans. 

The services of army officers have been recorded by several authors, but those 
of the Navy and the Marine Corps have been wholly neglected — the Official 
Registers merely giving the name, place of birth, date of last commission, and 
present station. Much more is required, not alone in justice to these gallant 
patriots, but as part of our national history ; as an incitement to others to pursue 
the career in which, while performing duty, they won renown. The present 
volume endeavors to supply this want. For the conductors of the public press, 
who may have occasion to write about these brave men, living or dead, (for, 
though glory is immortal, those who obtain it must submit to the common 
destiny of their race,) this work will be a treasury of facts, accurate in its full 
details. Henceforth, when an Officer of the Navy or Marine Corps passes to th^ 
better land, the recording journalist can draw upon these pages for the substan- 
tial facts of his public service, and not, as hitherto, make mere mention of his 
name. 

Here are the records of Living Officers of the United States Navy and Blarine 
Corps, (from the grade of Admiral down to that of Lieutenant-Commander, 

(5) 



PREFACE. 



inclusive, not omitting full Surgeons, Paymasters, Engineers, and Marine 
Officers,) as they appear in the Navy Register for 1870 ; also, a History of the 
Naval Operations daring the Eebellion of 1861-5, with the names of the vessels 
and a list of the officers participating in the great battles. These records have 
been generally verified by collation with the books of the Navy Department. 
Occasionally, information has been obtained from the officers themselves. 

In the cases of such Eetired Officers as had entered the Navy early in the 
present century, it has often been difficult, sometimes impossible, to obtain 
a correct record of their first services. The first Navy Register was pub- 
lished in 1816, and, for some years later, all Paymasters' Accounts, with the 
Muster and Pay-rolls, were filed in the office of the Comptroller of tbe Treasury, 
and perished when that edifice was destroyed by fire in 1833. To explain why, 
in the cases of some of the Retired naval officers, the commission of Captain 
follows that of Lieutenant, the intermediate grades of Lieutenant-Commander 
and Commander being omitted, it should be known that the law of 1867 pro- 
vided that officers on the Retired List should be promoted with officers of the 
same date on the active list. Thus, officers who had for many years been Lieu- 
tenants on the Retired List were promoted at once, in pursuance of this law, to 
the rank of Captain, and even of Commodore. 

The second portion of this volume is a History of the important Naval opera- 
tions of the different squadrons during the late war, chiefly compiled from the 
annual reports of the Secretary of the Navy and the official reports of the com- 
manding officers. As far as practicable, the language of these reports, at once 
graphic and terse, has been retained, and the Commanders' own words are also 
given, with no more alteration than was necessary in placing the events in clear 
chronological order. 

The closing section contains the names of officers and vessels participating in 
the great Naval battles of the Rebellion. It is the only complete list of this 
character ever published. 

Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps are requested to send to the author, 
(in care of his publishers, J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia,) any addenda, 
corrections or suggestions which he can make use of in subsequent editions. 

Philadelphia, February, 1870. 



Records of Living Officers of the U. S. Nayy. 



ADMIEAL DAVID GLASCOE FARRAGUT, 

Born at Campbell's Station, East Tennessee, 1801. Appointed Midshipman 
" at large" December 17th, 1810 ; commissioned as Lieutenant January 13th, 
1825; attached to receiving ship at Norfolk, Va., 1827; serving on board 
sloop of war Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1829 and 30 ; attached to sloop of 
war Natchez, Brazil Squadron, 1834 ; commissioned as Commander September 
8th, 1841 ; commanding sloop of war Decatur, Brazil Squadron, 1843 ; attached 
to Norfolk Navy Yard 1846; commanding sloop of war Saratoga, Home Squad- 
ron, 1847-9 ; serving at Norfolk Navy Yard 1850 ; commissioned as Captain 
March, 1851 ; on Ordnance duty 1851-54 ; commanding Mare Island Navy 
Yard, California, 1856-58 ; commanding sloop of war Brooklyn, Home Squad- 
ron, 1859-60; waiting orders 1861 ; commissioned as Rear Admiral July 16th, 
1862; as Vice Admiral December 21st, 1864; as Admiral July 25th, 1866. 
He has had twenty-five years' sea service ; eighteen years' shore duty, and has 
been fourteen years unemployed. 

The name of David Glascoe . Farragut is one of the most famous in the 
annals of the United States Navy. When a boy of nine years, his father pro- 
cured him an appointment as Midshipman, and his first cruise was in the 
frigate Essex, Commodore Porter. While serving in the Essex he participated 
in the engagement which resulted in the capture of H. M. ship Alert. On 
March 28th, 1814, after a desperate and bloody fight of three hours, the 
frigate Essex was captured in the Bay of Valparaiso by H. M. ships Phoebe, of 
thirty-six guns, and Cherub, of twenty-eight guns. 

Midshipman Farragut, twelve years of age, was wounded, the only wound he 
ever received, being knocked down the hatch by a falling man, and severely 
bruised. In his official report to the Secretary of the Navy, Commodore 
Porter made special and honorable mention of the lad, saying with appropriate 
regret that " the boy was too young for promotion." 

Under Commodore Porter, in the West Indies, Midshipman Farragut took 
part in the attack on the rendezvous of pirates, at Cape Cruz, on the south side 
of the Island of Cuba, July 23, 1823. The United States naval force con- 
sisted of the schooner Grey-Hound, Lieut. Commander L. Kearney, and 
schooner Beagle, Lieut. Commander L. S. Newton. The attack lasted twelve 
hours. The boats of the pirates were captured and their village burned. 

From this time, for nearly forty years, he was sailing about the world, or 
quietly serving at different naval stations ; and at long intervals, rising by 
seniority from grade to grade. 

When the Rebellion began, Captain Farragut was sixty years of age, and had 
been in the service forty-eight years. He was living at Norfolk, Virginia, 
where he had married, and being a native of the South, it was hoped by the 



8 ADMIRAL. 

rebels that lie would cast his fortunes with the seceding States. His firm 
determination to remain true to the flag, called forth no unmeaning threats. 
He was plainly informed that it would not be safe for him to remain in the 
South with the sentiments he held. He left Norfolk on the 18th of April, 
1861, the night before the burning of the Navy Yard and government vessels. 

Captain Earragut's first appointment during the Rebellion was to the com- 
mand of the naval espedition organized for the caj)ture of the city of New 
Orleans. His orders reached him January 20, 1862, and on the 3d of Febru- 
ary following he sailed from Hampton Roads, in his famous flag-ship Hartford, 
for Ship Island, which place the fleet reached in safety, and there- made final 
preparations for the attack on the defences of New Orleans. These defences 
consisted of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, mounting one hundred and twenty 
guns of long range and heavy calibre, a fleet of twenty armed steamers, and 
four powerful steam iron-clad rams, one of them of four thousand tons, with a 
battery of sixteeen heavy guns, and, in addition, chains, rafts, and fire ships. 
On the 24th of April, Farragut attacked and passed the forts, encountered and 
destroyed the rebel fleet, under J. K. Mitchell, and ascended the Mississippi 
River. On the 25th attacked the Chalmette batteries, on each side of the 
river, three miles below New Orleans, drove the enemy from their guns, took 
possession of the forts, and on the same day captured the city. June 24th, 
1863, the Admiral, with his fleet, passed Grand Gulf; on the 28th commenced 
the attack upon, and passed Vicksburg and its surrounding batteries. On the 
16th of July, to the mortification of the Admiral, the rebel iroQ-clad ram 
Arkansas made its appearance, having escaped out of the Yazoo River, passed 
through the fleet exchanging shots, and reached the cover of the Vicksburg 
batteries. At 7 P. M. the fleet passed down the river, engaging the batteries 
and ram at Vicksburg. The army having failed to co-operate with the fleet, 
and Farragut not having sufficient force to make a land attack on Vicksburg, 
he was compelled to proceed to New Orleans, as it had become necessary to 
repair most of the vessels of his squadron. In March, 1863, Farragut was 
ordered to open communication with Rear Admiral Porter, of the Mississippi 
Squadron, and General Grant, both of whom were operating against Vicksburg. 
He therefore moved up in strong force from Baton Rouge, and on March 14th 
the fleet attempted to pass the batteries at Port Hudson, but only the flag-ship 
Hartford and the Albatross were successful. With these he succeeded in 
approaching Vicksburg, and in communicating with Rear Admiral Porter across 
the Peninsula. 

This gallant act of Rear Admiral Farragut being efiected, the navy had com- 
mand of the river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and was enabled to 
establish a blockade of Red River, and thus intercept the supplies from Texas 
destined for the rebel armies. This accomplished, the Admiral left his flao-- 
ship, the Hartford, and returning below, by way of the Atchafalaya, he 
resumed operations for a final assault on Port Hudson. 

May 24th he engaged the batteries at Port Hudson, and from that time until 
July 9th, when the garrison surrendered, he gallantly and efficiently co-operated 
with the army in its investment of the place. The river being now open Far- 
ragut turned over to Rear Admiral Porter the entire control of the western 
waters above New Orleans. Deeming that his long service and useful labors of 
eighteen months entitled this gallant officer to special consideration, the depart- 
ment tendered him a leave of absence, which he accepted. 

August 5th, 1864, the fleet under Rear Admiral Farragut passed the forts at 
the entrance of Mobile Bay, and engaged the rebel iron-clad Tennessee and her 
consorts. After a desperate fight of several hours' duration the rebel fleet sur- 



VICE ADMIEAL. _ 9 

rendered to the United States naval forces, and the fall of Mobile became a 
mere question of time ; Fort Powell was blown up August 6th, Fort Gaines sur- 
rendered August Sih, and Fort Morgan August 23d. 

In September, 1864, Vice Admiral Farragut was offered the command of the 
naval expedition, then fitting out for the attack upon the defences of Wilming- 
ton, North Carolina; but impaired health obliged him to decline. In the 
summer of 1867, Admiral Farragut was ordered to the command of the 
European Squadron. He sailed from Brooklyn, New York, in the frigate 
Franklin, in 1867, and returned to the United States in the fall of 1868. 
During this cruise Admiral Farragut was everywhere received with respect 
and courtesy. The crowned heads and titled nobility of Europe seemed to 
vie with their humblest subjects in doing honor to this noble specimen of 
the American naval officer. 



VICE ADMIRAL DAVID D. PORTER. 

David D. Pouter is a native of the State of Pennsylvania. Appointed Mid- 
shipman from that State, February 2d, 1829; attached to frigate Constellation, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1830 ; frigate United States, same squadron, 1833-34; 
attached to ship-of the-line Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835 ; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1836 ; ou Coast Survey duty, 1837-40 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 27th, 1841 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1843-45 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C, 1846. Lieutenant 
Porter was attached to Home Squadron, 1847, and actively engaged in the war 
with Mexico; was present at the two attacks on Vera Cruz and one on Tuspan, and 
one at Tobasco ; participated also in a land fio;ht at Tamultee, and a similar en- 
gagement at Chiflon ; on Coast Survey duty, 1848-49; on leave of absence, 1850; 
commanding Pacific Mail Steamer Georgia, 1851-53 ; on leave of absence, 1854 ; 
commanding store-ship Supply, 1855-57; attached to Portsmouth Navy Yard, N. 
H., 1858-60 ; promoted to Commander, April 22d, 1861 ; commissioned as 
Rear Admiral, July 4th, 1863 ; as Vice Admiral, July 25th, 1866. 

Vice Admiral Porter was actively employed from the beginning to the close 
of the rebellion. As early as April, 1861, he sailed from New York in the 
Powhatan for Fort Pickens, and remained on the coast of Florida until ordered 
North to assume command of the mortar fleet fitting out to co-operate with 
Admiral Farragut in his attack on the defences of New Orleans. He dis- 
played great energy in hastening the sailing of these vessels, and when Farra- 
gut arrived at the Southwest Pass, Porter's vessels were at their stations and 
ready to commence the attack. 

On the 11th of April, 1862, he began the bombardment of Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip. The mortar flotilla kept up a steady fire, with but slight ces- 
sation, for six days and nights, at the end of which time both of the forts, 
powerful as they were, and desperate as was their resistance, had become so 
weakened and the garrison so demoralized, as, in the judgment of the Flag Officer, 
to render the passage of the fleet possible. 

On April 28th, Brigadier General Duncan, commanding the coast defences, 
and Lieutenant Colonel Higgins, commanding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
surrendered to Commander Porter. From this time until July, 1862, he re- 
mained in command of the mortar flotilla, actively, zealously, and efficiently co- 
operating with Admiral Farragut in his operations on the Mississippi, from New 



10 VICE ADMIRAL. 

Orleans to Vicksburg. Commander Porter was soon after appointed Acting 
Rear Admiral, and ordered to the command of the Mississippi Squadron. The 
true character of his natural endowments and professional attainments may be 
seen in his creating a fleet of one hundred and twenty-five vessels — a number 
far exceeding that commanded by any other officer in the history of naval war- 
fare — out of the material afforded by ordinary river steamboats, which he plated, 
armed and equipped, making them formidable and efficient war vessels. In the 
squadron there were more than thirteen hundred officers ; of these not more than 
twenty-five were of the regular navy, the rest consisting mainly of Western 
steamboat men, utterly without naval training, but who, under the rigid dis- 
cipline and inspiring example of their commander, soon became valuable and 
trustworthy officers. In January, 1863, Admiral Porter's fleet captured Ar- 
kansas Post, on the Arkansas river, and in the month of May following he de- 
stroyed the formidable rebel batteries at Grand Gulf. Invaluable aid was ren- 
dered to the army under General Grant by Admiral Porter in the reduction of 
Vicksburg, which surrendered July 4, 1863. 

During the siege of Vicksburg his mortar fleet were forty days without inter- 
mission throwing shells into the city and even into the works beyond it. Thir- 
teen heavy guns were landed from the vessels, and men and officers sent to 
man thenl. Before the city capitulated, sixteen thousand shells were thrown 
from the mortars, gunboats, and naval batteries. 

In addition to these successes. Admiral Porter obtained control of the Yazoo 
river, sweeping from its channel the net-work of torpedoes and contrivances for 
submarine warfare near its confluence with the Mississippi. These efi'orts were 
followed by. the novel and singular Yazoo Pass expedition, and the expeditions 
of Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. The Cumberland and "rennessce rivers were 
actively patrolled by his vigilant officers, and the exciting chase of Slorgan by 
the steamers on the Ohio river, over a distance of five hundred miles, intercept- 
ing bim and his band when attempting to escape, naturally attracted the atten- 
tion of the country. 

In jMarch, 1864, a portion of the Mississippi Squadron, under Admiral 
Porter, ascended the Eed river to form a junction with the army under General 
Banks at Alexandria, La. From this point, with some of his most formidable 
iron-clads, Admiral Porter penetrated some fifty miles further up the river, to 
Springfield Landing. While at Springfield Landing he learned that the army 
under General Banks had met with a reverse, and was falling back to Pleasant 
Hill, some distance below. Pi,ear Admiral Porter was therefore compelled to 
turn back, his retracing steps harassed at every available point by the enemy, 
flushed with their recent success against the army. 

On the 14th of April, Admiral Porter reached Graud-Ecore, where he found 
the vessels he had left at that point still detained above the bar. The river 
instead of rising as customary at this season, had fallen during his absence, and 
the destruction of the best portion of the Squadron seemed inevitable. But in 
the words of the Admiral, " Providence provided a man for the occasion." 
Lieut. Col. Bailey, Acting Engineer of the 19th army corps, constructed a 
series of dams across the river at the falls, and the water risinn- to a sufficient 
height, the imperiled boats passed safely over the bar. 

itear Admiral Porter, who had displayed ability of the hio-hest order and as 
commander of the Mississippi Squadron, had met with marked success in his 
operations against the enemy, and who, moreover, enjoyed the entire confidence 
of the department and the nation, was detached from the Jlississippi and 
ordered to the command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron which 
embraced within its limits Cape Fear river and the port of Wilmin"-ton.' 



REAR ADMIRALS. H 

A fleet comprising all the available vessels at the disposal of the department, 
and commanded by officers who had distinguished themselves in the earlier 
operations of the war, was assembled at Hampton Roads. In the early part of 
December the fleet sailed for Beaufort, N. C, where they were to rendezvous. Final 
preparations for the attack were then made. On the 24th of December, 1804, 
Rear Admiral Porter, with a force of thirty-five vessels, five of which were iron- 
clads, and a reserve force of nineteen vessels, commenced the bombardment of the 
forts at the mouth of Cape Pear river, and silenced them in an hour and a: 
quarter. On the following day the fleet renewed the attack, and seriously 
damaged the enemy's works. 

General Butler, who commanded the military forces, after a reconnoissanoe, de- 
cided that the place could not be carried by assault. He, therefore, after inform- 
ing Rear Admiral Porter of his intention, returned with his command to Hamp- 
ton Roads. Admiral Porter, aware of the necessity of reducing the works, and 
the great importance of closing the port of Wilmington, and confident that with 
adequate military support the fort could be carried, earnestly requested that the 
enterprise should not be abandoned. On the suggestion of the President, 
Lieutenant-Geueral Grant was advised of the confidence felt by RearlAdmiral 
Porter, chat he could obtain complete success, provided he should be sufliciently 
sustained. Such military aid was therefore invited as would secure the fall of 
Fort Fisher. A second military force was promptly detailed, composed of about 
8,500 men, imder command of Maj. Gen. A. H. Terry, and sent forward. 
This force arrived off Fort Fisher on the 13th of January. Oflensive opera- , 
tions were at once resumed by the naval force, and the troops were landed and 
entrenched themselves, while a portion of the fleet bombarded the works. These 
operations were continued throughout the 14th with an increased uutnber of 
vessels. The 15th was the day decided upon for the assault. 

During the morning of that day, forty-four vessels poured an incessant fire 
into the fort. There was besides a force of fourteen vessels in reserve. At 
3 P. M. the signal for the assault was made. Desperate fighting ensued ; tra- 
verse after traverse was taken, and by 10 P. M. the works were all carried. 

Fourteen hundred sailors and marines were landed, and participated in the 
direct assault. Seventy-five guns, many of them superb rifle pieces, and nine- 
teen hundred prisoners were the immediate fruits of the victory. 

In 1866, Vice Admiral Porter was appointed Superintendent of the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, which institution, under his excellent management, has 
acquired the highest standing. He is now on duty at the Navy Department. 



REAR ADMIRAL LOUIS BI. GOLDSBOROUGH 

Was born in Washington, D. C, February 18th, 1805. Appointed Midship- 
man from District of Columbia, June 18th, 1812; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
January 13th, 1825, and ordered to Mediterranean Squadron; attached to 
schooner Porpoise, Mediterranean Squadron, 1827-29. In 1827, Lieut. Goids- 
borough, then executive officer of the Porpoise, was ordered to take command 
of a night expedition, consisting of four boats, thirty-five men and officers, to 
retake an English brig, the Comet, from the Greek pirates, two hundred of 
whom were in full possession of her. The attempt was a desperate one, and 
required a desperate effort, but it met with entire success, though not until 
many of the enemy had been killed — an average of very nearly three to every 
man of the attacking party. The ward-room steward of the Porpoise, a mulatto 



12 REAE ADMIRALS. 

of herculean strength, was one of the expedition, and killed with his own hand 
no less than eleven of the pirates ; while the chief of the horde, with several 
of his men, was despatched by the pistol of Lieut. John A. Carr, of Virginia, a 
gallant officer, long since dead. These pirates were at this time so numerous 
that no merchant vessel, unprotected hy convoy, could venture to thread ita 
course among the islands of the Greek archipelago with impunity ; and so pow- 
erful were they, that at one time they succeeded in capturing an Austrian ten 
"gun man-of-war brig. Our merchant marine suffered heavily by their depre- 
dations, for they attacked indiscriminately vessels of every nation except their 
own. In such a state of affliirs, a sound thrashing, like that administered by 
Lieut. Goldsborough and his little company, could hardly fail of good effect ; 
and ou the arrival of the Porpoise at Malta, the Governor of the place felt called 
■upon to return the thanks of his government to her Commander, and through 
him to the officers and men who had been personally poncerned in the exploit. 

Lieut. Goldsborough was attached to the frigate United States, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1840, and made a full cruise in that ship. Commissioned as Commander, 
September 8th, 1841. In 1847, Commander Goldsborough was present as ex- 
ecutive officer of the frigate Ohio, at the siege of Vera Cruz. After a bombard- 
ment of four days, by the fleet under Commodore Perry, and the army under 
Gen. Scott, the city and castle surrendered, March 29th, 1847, and the naval 
forces were despatched to capture the several Mexican ports on the Gulf; Com- 
modore Goldsborough, having under his command a force of three hundred 
officers and men from the Ohio, being engaged in the taking of Tuspan, a small 
maritime town, about one hundred and fifty miles north of Vera Cruz. These 
ports were thrown open to commerce and duties on imports imposed for the 
benefit of the U. S. Government. 

In 1852-53, Commodore Goldsborough commanded the sloop-of-war Levant, 
Mediterranean Squadron. Commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855; 
Superintendent of Naval Academy, Annapolis, 1854-57; commanding frigate 
Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1859-60. In the early part of 1862, a joint expe- 
dition of the navy and army was organized for operations in the waters of North 
Carolina. The naval force, which consisted of seventeen light draught vessels, 
arrived at Hatteras Inlet, January 13th, 1862; but the army was not fully pre- 
pared for active co-operation until three weeks later. On the morning of 5th 
of February, the combined expedition proceeded towards Pioanoke Island. The 
mural vessels, placed by Flag Officer Goldsborough under the immediate com- 
mand of Commander Pv,owan, were formed in three separate columns, com- 
manded respectively by Lieiits. Reed Werden, Alexander Murray, and H. K. 
Davenport. On the morning of the 7th, the vessels of the insurgents, eight in 
number, were discovered drawn up behind an extensive barricade, formed by a 
double row of piles and sunken vessels stretching across the sound. At 10.30 
the engagement commenced, and by noon became general. At 4 P. M. the 
batteries were temporarily silenced, and the first landing of troops efiected. At 
midnight, over ten thousand troops had disembarked. The engagement was 
renewed the following morning, and carried on chiefly by tjie army until 1 P. M., 
when the fleet proceeded to open a passage through the obstructions, which was 
successfully accomplished by 5 o'clock P. M., and the national flag was hoisted 
on Pork Point. Firing other of their works and one of their steamers were 
the closing events of the day; the rebels yielding the island to the possession 
of the U. S. forces. The rebel fleet was pursued into Pasquotank river by 
Commander Puowan's flotilla, and on the 10th, overtaken and captured. On 
the 14th of March, 1862, the town of Newbern, N. C, was occupied by a de- 
tachment of Flag Officer Goldsborough's squadron. 



HEAR ADMIRALS. 13 

On the lOtli of May, 1862, the fleet, under the command of Flag Officer 
Groldsborough, engaged and silenced the rebel batteries at Sewell's Point, oppo- 
site Fortress Monroe, and passed up to Norfolk, which had been previously 
evacuated by the rebels. Commissioned as Bear Admiral, July 16th, 1862. 
At the close of the war, Rear Admiral Goldsborough was ordered to command 
the European Squadron. He returned from this service in 1868, and is now 
under orders to command Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. 



EEAR ADMIRAL CHARLES H. DAVIS. 

Charles H. Davis was bom in Massachusetts, January 16th, 1807. He was 
appointed midshipman from the same State, August 12th, 1823. Midshipman 
Davis was attached to the frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1827-28 ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, Blarch 2.3d, 1829, and attached to the sloop- 
of-war Ontario, Mediterranean Squadron, 1880-83 ; commissioned as Lieutenant 
March 8d, 1884, and ordered to the sloop-of-war Vincennes, Pacific Squadron; 
during the years 1837-38 on special duty; attached to razee Independence, 
Brazil Squadron, 1840—41; on ordnance duty from 1842—48, and special duty 
from 1849-56. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 12th, 1854; in 1857, Commander Davis 
was ordered to the command of the sloop-of-war St. Mary's, Pacific Squadron, 
and was attached to that vessel until January, 1859, when he returned, and was 
appointed Superintendent of Nautical Almanac. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1861. Captain Davis was a member of the Board 
of Officers convened for the purpose of making a thorough investigation of the 
Southern coast and harbors, their access and defences; and one of the immediate 
results of their investigations was the organization of Dupont's expedition to 
Port Royal, S. C, in which Captain Davis bore an important part. 

On the 9th of May, 1862, Captain Davis was appointed Flag Officer of the 
Mississippi Flotilla, relieving Flag Officer Foote. On the 11th of the same 
month, an attack, for which the rebel fleet lying below Fort Pillow had been 
long preparing, was made on Flag Officer Davis' flotilla. The rebel fleet of 
eight iron-clad steamers, four of them fitted as rams, steamed up fully prepared 
for an engagement, and the flotilla was quickly in motion to receive them. An 
action of an hour's duration, at the closest quarters, followed, at the end of 
which the enemy retreated under the guns of Fort Pillow, three of their gun- 
boats having been disabled. On the 5th of June Fort Pillow was abandoned 
by the rebels. 

The flotilla moved down the river, and on the morning of the 8th of June 
engaged the rebel fleet of eight gunboats and rams, opposite the city of INIem- 
phis. A running fight followed, carrying the vessels several miles below 
Memphis, and resulting in the capture or destruction of the entire rebel fleet, 
except the Van Horn, which succeeded in escaping. At the close of the en- 
gagement Flag Officer Davis returned to Memphis, and demanded the surrender 
of the city, which was complied with. 

On the 29 th of June, Flag Officer Davis left Memphis with a part of his 
flotilla and six mortar-boats, and on the 2d of July following joined Rear Ad- 
miral Farragut above Vicksburg, the latter officer, with a portion of his squadron, 
having arrived there a few days previous. Demonstrations were continued by 



14 REAR ADMIRALS. 

the combined squadrons, at intervals, on the defences of Vicksburg, for some 
days, the mortar vessels of each squadron bombarding from both above and 
below. 

There not being a sufficient military force to co-operate in the reduction of 
Vicksburg, the scheme was, for the time, abandoned, and, late in July, Flag 
Officer Davis withdrew his command to the mouth of the Yazoo river. 

In August following, a joint expedition was planned, by Flag Officer Davis 
and General Curtis, for operations up the Yazoo, which was entirely successful, 
resulting in the capture of a battery of heavy guns, field-pieces, munitions, etc. 

Flag Officer Davis was commissioned as Commodore, U. S. Navy, July 16th, 
1862, and, in the fall of the same year, was ordered to duty, in the Navy De- 
partment, as Chief of Bureau of Navigation. While filling this position, he 
was commissioned as Bear Admiral, taking rank from February 7th, 1863. In 
the year 1865, Hear Admiral Davis was appointed Superintendent of the Naval 
Observatory, Washington, and continued there until 1867, in which year he was 
ordered to command the South Atlantic Squadron, coast of Brazil, where he 
remained until the summer of 1869. 



REAR ADMIRAL JOHN A. DAHLGREN. 

John A. Dahigren was born in Philadelphia. He was appointed Midship- 
man from the Slate of Pennsylvania, February 1st, 1826. Midshipman Dahl- 
gren's first cruise was in the frigate Macedonian, Brazil Squadron, in the years 
1827-29; attached to the sloop-of-war Ontario, Mediterranean Squadron, in 
1830-32 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 20th, 1832 ; on coast survey 
duty, from 1836 to 1842; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8th, 1837 ; attached 
to frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-5 ; on ordnance duty 
from 1847 to 1857, during which time he perfected the invention of the famous 
Dahlgren gun ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; command- 
ins ordnance ship Plymouth, 1858-9 ; on ordnance duty at Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1860-61. 

At the breaking out of the Rebellion, the Commandant and most of the offi- 
cers attached to the Washington Navy Yard resigned their commissions, and 
went South. Commander Dahlgren was true among the faithless, and, as a 
recognition of his unswerving loyalty. President Lincoln appointed liiui Com- 
mandant of the Washington Navy Yard; commissioned as Captain, July 16tb, 

1862, and shortly afterwards appointed Chief of Bureau of Ordnance. 
Promoted to Rear Admiral, February 7th, 1863, and in the summer follow- 
ing ordered to the command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
relieving Rear Admiral Dupont; assumed command of the squadron, July 6th, 

1863. A combined operation of naval and army forces, the latter under Gen- 
eral Gillmore, was instituted for the occupation and possession of Morris 
Island, on the south side of the entrance into Charleston harbor. After a long 
and severe struggle, the army operating upon land, with the efficient co-operar 
tion of the monitors and the New Ironsides, Morris Island, with all its batteries, 
was captured, and Fort Sumpter was soon made a pile of ruins by the fierce 
artillery of the combined forces. 

The fleet of Admiral Dahlgren remained inside the bar, and after the capture 
of Jliirris Island, blockade running, so far as Charleston was concerned, was at 
an end. 



REAR ADMIRALS. 15 

In February, 1864, a successful expedition, commanded by Rear Admiral 
Dahlgren in person, ascended the St. John's River, to aid a military force 
intended to be thrown into Florida. 

On the 12th of December, 1864, General Sherman, having successfully acoom- 
plished his march to the sea, rdtohed the vicinity of Savannah, and communica- 
tion between him and Rear Admiral Dahlgren was immediately established. 
The latter made the best possible disposition of the vessels then under his com- 
mand to assist the army in obtaining possession of Savannah, which was occu- 
pied by General Sherman on the 2l8t of December. 

On the morning of the 18th of February, 1865, the city of Charleston was 
evacuated by the rebel forces, and Rear Admiral Dahlgren at once moved his 
vessels up to the city. 

The evacuation of Charleston was followed by that of Georgetown, on Febru- 
ary 23d, and on the 26th of that month the place itself was occupied by Rear 
Admiral Dahlgren. 

In 1866, Rear Admiral Dahlgren was ordered to the command of South 
Pacific Squadron, and returned from that service in 1868, and was, for the 
second time, appointed Chief of Bureau of Ordnance. In the fall of 18G9, 
ordered to the command of the Washington Navy Yard. 



REAR ADMIRAL SYLVANUS W. GODON. 

Stltanus W. Godon was born in Pennsylvania. He was appointed Mid- 
shipman from the same State, March 1st, 1819; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, and ordered to frigate Macedonian, Brazil Squadron, 1827; on duty at 
Naval School, Norfolk, Va., 1829 ; serving in sloop-of-war Natchez, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1830 , attached to frigate Potomac, Pacific Squadron, 1833-4 ; 
serving in schooner Shark, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, December 17th, 1836; attached to sloop-of-war Peacock, East 
India Squadron, 1836-7 ; and to sloop-of-war Cyane, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1840; attached to bomb brig Vesuvius, 1847, at the siege of Vera Cruz ; 
on special duty, 1850 ; executive officer of steamer Susquehanna, East India 
Squadron, 1851-53 ; promoted to Commander, September 14th, 1855; com- 
manding sloop-of-war Mohican, Pacific Squadron, 1860. 

Commissioned as Captain in 1861, and ordered to command of sloop-of-war 
Powhatan, one of the vessels of Dupont's Expedition to Port Royal. Promoted 
to Commodore, January 2d, 1863; on special duty, 1864; commanding 
steamer Susquehanna, and fourth division of Porter's Squadron, at the two 
battles of Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding South At- 
lantic Squadron, Coast of Brazil, 1866-7. Commandant Navy Yard, New 
York, 1869. _ 

Rear Admiral Godon's record shows that he has served in all parts of the 
world. Of forty years' service, twenty-four have been at sea — a greater propor- 
tion of sea service than shown by the record of any other officer of his grade. 



REAR ADMIRAL WILLIAM RADFORD. 

William Radford was born in Virginia. He was appointed from the State 
of Missouri, March 1st, 1825 ; attached to Mediterranean Squadron, 1827-28; 
and to sloop-of-war Erie, West India Squadron, 1830-31; promoted to Passed 



16 REAR ADMIRALS. 

Midsliipman, June 4t'h, 1831; atfcaclied to sloop-of-war John Adams, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1835; promoted to Lieutenant, February 9th, 1887; attached 
to sloop-ot'-war Warren, Pacific Squadron, 1845-47. 

Lieutenant Radford commanded the party that cut out the Malokadel, a Mex- 
ican vessel of war, at Mazatlan, West Coast of Mexico ; attached to store-ship 
Lexington, 1852-53. 

Promoted to Commodore, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Dacotah, Bast India Squadron, 18S0-61 ; commissioned as Captain in 1862 ; 
commanding sloop-of-war Cumberland in 1861, and was on court-martial duty 
at Old Point, when that ship was attacked by the ram Blerrimac, which had 
steamed down from Norfolk. Commander Radford made strenuous exertions to 
reach his ship before the fight was over, but arrived at Newport News just aa 
the Cumberland was sinking. 

Promoted to Commodore, April 24th, 1863. 

Commanded frigate New Ironsides, and iron-clad division of Porter's squadron 
at the two attacks upon Fort F'isher, in December, lS64, and January, 1865. 

Commandant of Washington Navy Yard, 1866-68. 

Commanding European Squadron in 1869. 



REAR ADMIRAL STEPHEN C. ROWAN. 

Born in Ireland, December 2Sth, 1805; appointed Blidshipman from Ohio, 
February 15th, 1826, and ordered to the sloop-of-war Viucennes, Pacific 
Squadron ; serving in schooner Experiment, Chesapeake Bay, 1831 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 1832, and attached to sloop-of-war 
Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1834-36, and to store-ship Relief, 1837. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant in 1837 ; on coast survey duty, 1840 ; attached 
to frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1843 ; serving in Pacific Squadron, 
1846-48, and took an active part in the war with Mexico. 

Commanded naval battalion under Commodore Stockton at the battle of the 
Niesa, Upper California; commanded a landing party that made a successful 
night attack on a Mexican outpost, near Mazatlan ; Executive OflScer of the 
Cyane when she bombarded Guaymas; on ordnance duty 1850-53. 

Promoted to Commander, September 14th, 1855, and ordered to command of 
store-ship Relief; on ordnance duty, 1858-61; commanded sloop-of-war Pawnee, 
1861-62. 

In May, 1861, when in command of the Pawnee, engaged the rebel battery 
at Acquia Creek. This was the first action of the war. While in command of 
the Pawnee, he participated in the attack and capture of the forts and garrison 
at Hatteras Inlet. 

February 7th, 1862, commanded a naval flotilla in the sounds of North 
Carolina, and took part in the successful combined attack of the navy and army 
upon Roanoke Island, on February 8th. On the morning after the capture of 
Roanoke Island, Commander Rowan, with a portion of his flotilla, pursued 
the enemy into Albemarle Sound, and at 8 A. M., February 10th, the rebel 
steamers, under the command of W. F. Lynch, formerly of the U. S. Navy, 
were discovered drawn up behind a battery of four guns, supported by a schooner 
on the opposite side of the river, armed with two heavy thirty-two pounders. 
Fire was opened by the insurgents from the fort and steamers at long rano-e. 
Commander Rowan pushed on steadily until within thrce-fuurths of a mile 



REAR ADMIRALS. 17 

■fflien he opened fire and dashed ahead at full speed. This bold and wholly 
Tinaatiolpated onset dismayed the rebels, -who hastily abandoned their works, 
■which, with their entire fleet, were captured or destroyed. 

Passing up the river, the flotilla took possession of Elizabeth City. Lieuten- 
ant Murray was despatched with a small force to Edenton, of which he quietly 
took possession, and on returning from this duty he was sent to obstruct the 
Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal. In this expedition there were five armed 
steamers and one schooner destroyed, and one steamer, the Ellis, captured. 
Commissioned as Captain, July 10th, 1862, and as a reward for distinguished 
gallantry, promoted to Commodore, to take rank from the same date. 

Commodore Eowan commanded the naval forces at the fall of Newbern, N. C.; 
commanded the New Ironsides off Charleston, and participated in the different 
engagements with Forts Wagner, Gregg and Moultrie. 

Commissioned as Eear Admiral, July 25th, 1866 ; Commandant Norfolk 
Navy Yard, 1866-67 ; commanding Asiatic Squadron, 1868-69. 



BEAR ADMIRAL THOMAS T. CRAVEN. 

Thomas T. Craven was born in the District of Columbia. Appointed 
Midshipman from the State of New Hampshire, May 1st, 1822 ; serving in the 
sloop-of-war Peacock, Pacific Squadron, 1827 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
May 24th, 1828; serving in sloop-of-war Erie, West India Squadron, 1829. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 27, 1830 ; serving in brig Boser, Brazil 
Squadron, 1833, and attached to receiving-ship at New York, 1836 ; exploring 
expedition, 1840 ; attached to razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1850 ; on duty at Naval Academy, 1851-55. i 

Commissioned as Commander, December 16th, 1852; commanding frigate 
Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-58 ; Naval Academy, 1859 ; com.. 
manding sloop Mohawk, Home Squadron, 1860. 

Commissioned as Captain, June 7th, 1861 ; commanding sloop-of-war Brook- 
lyn, Home Squadron, 1861-62; while in command of the Brooklyn, partici- 
pated in the attack upon and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. In this 
action. Captain Craven's vessel became entangled in the hulks and rafts which 
sustained the chain barricade of the river, and, while in this situation, received 
a severe fire from Fort St. Philip, and was attacked by one of the enemy's rams 
and a large rebel steamer ; the latter received a broadside from the Brooklyn, 
at sixty yards, so well delivered as to end the conflict, so far as the steamer was 
concerned. 

The ram struck the Brooklyn at the starboard gangway, but the chain-armor 
proved a perfect protection. By this time the Brooklyn had swung clear of the 
obstructions, and passed on up the river. Captain Craven continued in command 
of the Brooklyn, taking part in all the engagements along the Mississippi river, 
up to and including that of Vicksburg, until late in the summer of 1862, when 
he was detached and ordered North. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 10th, 1862 ; commauding steam-frigate 
Niagara, special service, European waters, 1864-65. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, October 10th, 1866; commandant of Navy 
Yard, Marc Island, California, 1867-68 ; commanding North Pacific Squadron, 
1869. o 



18 EEAK ADMIRALS. 

KEAE ADMIRAL JOSEPH LANMAN. 

Joseph Lanmanwrs born in Connecticut, July 11th, 1811. Appointed Mid- 
shipman from the same State, January 1st, 1825 ; attached to frigate Mace- 
donian, Brazil Squadron, 1827; sloop Peacock, West India Squadron, 1830; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; attached to schooner Dol- 
phin, Pacific Squadron, 1834-35, and to sloop Vincennes, same squadron, 
1836 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1835; serving in sloop Warren, 
West India Squadron, 1840 ; on ordnance duty, 1845-46; Pacific Squadron, 
1847-48. In the latter year, Lieutenant Lanman was complimented by beiog 
made bearer of despatches from the commanding officer of the Pacific Squad- 
ron, to the authorities at Washington ; special duty, 1849-51 ; sloop-of-war 
San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-53. 

Commissioned as Commander, Sept. 14th, 1855; Washington Navy Yard, 
1855-56; commanding steamer Michigan, on the Lakes, 1859-61. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1861 ; commandiDg steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1862; commissioned as Commodore, August 29th, 1862 ; command- 
ing steam sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1863 ; commanding frigate Min- 
nesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-65. 

Commodore Lanman commanded the 2d Division of Porter's Squadron, at 
the two attacks upon Fort Fisher, and performed his duty efficiently. 

Commissioned as Eear Admiral, December 8th, 1867; Commandant Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1867-68 ; commanding South Atlantic Squadron, 
coast of Brazil, 1869. 



EEAR ADMIRAL THOMAS TUENER. 

Thomas Tuenee is a native of Virginia. Appointed Midshipman from Vir- 
ginia, April 21st, 1825 ; attached to frigate Constellation, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1827; sloop-of-war Warren, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830 ; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; frigate Constellation, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1834, and frigate Delaware, same Squadron, 1835; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, December 22d, 1835 ; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 
1840 ; receiving-ship at Philadelphia, 1843 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 
1847. 

Lieutenant Turner was actively engaged in the war with Mexico, and. was 
present at Tuspan, April 7th, 1847 ; receiving-ship at Philadelphia, 1850 ; 
frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-53 ; on ordnance duty, 1854-57. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of- 
war Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1859-60; Commander Turner wag in command 
of Saratoga in the engagement between that vessel and two Spanish steamers, the 
Marquis of Havannah, and General Miramon, in the harbor of Anton Leyardo, 
Mexico, when they were captured, March 6th, 1860, at midnight. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862, and as Commodore, December 13th, 
1863 ; commanded frigate New Ironsides, special service, 1863 ; commanded 
frigate New Ironsides in the attack upon Forts Sumpter, Moultrie and Beaure- 
gard, in Charleston harbor, April 7th, 1863. Admiral Dupont was on board 
the New Ironsides, and commended Commodore Turner for the judgment and 
ability with which he handled his vessel; special duty. New York, 1864-65 ; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1866-67 ; on ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1868 ; 
commissioned as Eear Admiral, May 27th, 1868 ; commanding South Pacific 
Squadron, 1869. 



REAE ADMIRALS. 19 

KEAR ADMIRAL CHARLES H. POOR. 

Charles H. Poor was born at Cambridge, Mass., in June, 1809. Appointed 
Midshipman from Massachusetts, March Ist, 1823; attached to sloop-of-war 
John Adams, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Java, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1829 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, March 29th, 1829, and ordered to 
frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830; sloop-of-war Lexington, Bra- 
zil Squadron, 1833, and brig Boxer, same squadron, 1834. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, Deo. 31st, 1838 ; Rendezvous, Norfolk, Va., 
1836 ; razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1840 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1846-48; Inspector, etc., 1850-51; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 
1852-55. 

Commissioned as Commander, Sept. 14th, 1855 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., 
1856-58 ; commanding sloop-of-war St. Louis, Home Squadron, 1860-61 ; com- 
manded expedition of sailors and marines to reinforce Eort Pickens, 1861 ; 
frigate Roanoke, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861-62. Commander Poor took com- 
mand of steamer Illinois, to act as a ram against Merrimac, but did not have an 
opportunity to test the power of his vessel. Passed rebel batteries under fire 
at Sewell's Point, while proceeding from Hampton Roads towards Newport 
News in frigate Roanoke, to assist the Congress and Cumberland. 

Commissioned as Commodore, January 2d, 1863 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1803-65 ; compelled the authorities at Aspinwall to 
release U. S. Mail steamer detained to collect illegal dues, (approved by Secre- 
tary of the Navy) ; compelled authorities at Rio La Hache to hoist and salute 
the American flag which had been insulted, (approved by Secretary of the 
Navy) ; commanding Naval Station at Mound City, 111., 1866-68; commissioned 
Rear Admiral, Sept. 20th, 1868; Commandant Navy Yard, Washington, 1869 ; 
detached August 10th, 1869, and took command of North Atlantic Squadron, 
August 19th, 1809. 



REAR ADMIRALS ON RETIRED LIST. 



REAR ADMIRAL WILLIAM B. SHUBRICK. 

William B. SHnBRicic was born in South Carolina, October 31st, 1790. 
Appointed Midshipman from his native State, June 20th, 1806; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, January 5th, 1813 ; commanded a gun-boat in an attack on a 
British frigate, in Hampton Roads, in June, 1813 ; commanded a gun in the 
battle on Craney Island, when the British were repulsed, in June, 1813 ; was 
Third Lieutenant of the frigate Constitution in the action which resulted in 
the capture of the Cyane and Levant. 

Commissioned as Master Commandant, March 28th, 1820. Commanded 
sloop Lexington, Brazil Squadron, 1827; Navy Yard, Washington, 1830. Com- 
missioned as Captain, February 21st, 1831. On ordnance duty, 1833-37 ; 
commanding West India Squadron, 1840 ; Commandant Norfolk Navy Yard, 
1843 ; Chief of Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, 1845-46 ; commanding 
Pacific Squadron, during the Mexican war ; landed and captured the fortified 



20 REAR ADMIRALS. 

town of Mazatlan, from a superior force under General Telles, and held it and 
several inferior places to the end of the war. Ordnance duty, 1852 ; Chief 
of Bureau of Construction, 1853 j^^Chairman of Lighthouse Board, 1854-58 ; 
commanding Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859; commissioned 
as Rear Admiral, July 16th, 1862; Chairman of Lighthouse Board, 1860-69. 



EEAR ADMIRAL JOSEPH SMITH. 

Joseph Smith was born in Massachusetts, Marob 30th, 1790. Appointed 
Midshipman from the same State, January 16th, 1809 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, July 24th, 1813. 

Lieut. Smith served with distinguished gallantry at the battle of Lake Cham- 
plain, September 11th, 1814, and at the capture of Algerine vessels, 1815. He 
was wounded in the former action, and was favorably mentioned by his command- 
ing officer in his official report. Commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1827 ; 
attached to Boston Navy Yard, 1829; frigate Guerriere, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1830 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1834. Commissioned as Captain, February 9th, 1837 ; 
commanding ship-of-the-line Ohio, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840; command- 
ing receiving-ship, at Boston, 1843 ; commanding Mediterranean Squadron, 
1845. In 1847, Captain Smith was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Yards 
and Docks, which position he filled with great advantage to the government, 
and credit to himself, until the spring of 186'9, when failing health obliged him 
to resign. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral. July 16th, 1862. At present, on special 
duty at Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 



REAR ADMIRAL SILAS H. STRINGHAM. 

Silas H. Steingham was born in Middletown, Orange county, N. Y. 
Appointed Midshipman, June 19th, 1810. Midshipman Stringham's first ser- 
vice was in the frigate President, 1811-12. While attached to the President, 
he participated in the engagement with H. M. S. Little Belt, and in the engage- 
ment with H. M. S. Belvidere. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9tli, 1814. Lieutenant Stringham 
took part in the capture of the Algerine vessels, 1815. 

Commissioned as Commander, JIarch 3d, 1831; special duty, 1831-32; 
commanding sloop-of-war John Adams, 1836-37; Navy Yard, New York, 
1840. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1841 ; commanding frigate Independence, Home 
Squadron, 1843 ; commanding New York Navy Yard, 1845-46 ; commanding 
ship-of-the-line Ohio, Pacific Squadron, during the war with Mexico ; Com- 
mandant Norfolk Navy Yard, 1852; commanding Mediterranean Squadron, 
1852-55; Commandant Navy Yard, Boston, 1856-60; commandin"- N A 
B. Squadron, 1861. 



REAR ADMIRALS. 21 

Plag OflB.oer Stringham's squadron embraced within its limits the whole coast 
extending from the easternmost line of Virginia to Cape Florida, and with the 
small force the Department was able to place at his disposal, he did all that 
could be done in effecting a blockade of the Southern ports. After some delay, 
an expedition to Hatteras Inlet, on the coast of North Carolina, where piratical 
depredations had become extremely annoying, was undertaken. Flag Officer 
Stringham commanded in person the naval forces, and Major General Butler 
commanded the military forces, consisting of about eight hundred men, which 
co-operated with the squadron. The expedition was entirely successful in the 
attack upon and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark. The entire garrison, 
uiider command of Commodore Barron, who had been for nearly fifty years an 
officer in the U. S. Navy, surrendered, after sustaining great loss; while not a 
man was killed or wounded in the attacking force. It is to be regretted that 
the military force was not strong enough to follow up this victory. 

lu September, 1861, Flag Officer Stringham, at his own request, was relieved 
of the command of the squadron. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 16th, 1862 ; special duty, 1862-63 ; 
commandant Navy Yard, 1864-66; at present Port Admiral at New York. 



REAK ADMIRAL SAMUEL L. BREEZE. 

Samuel L. Breeze was born in New York. Appointed at large, Septem- 
ber 10th, 1810. Midshipman Breeze was present at the battle of Lake Cham- 
plain. Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 27th, 1816, and as Commander, 
December 22d, 1835 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1836; rendezvous, Baltimore, 
1840. Commissioned as Captain, September 8th, 1841 ; commanding frigate 
Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1845. 

Captain Breeze was in the Pacific during the Mexican war, and was present 
at the attack on, and capture of, the towns Tuspan and Tobasco, Mexico, and 
at the capture of Vera Cruz, 1847; special duty on the lakes, 1848; Command- 
ant Norfolk Navy Yard, 1853-55 ; commanding Mediterranean Squadron, 
1856-58 ; Commandant Navy Yard, New York, 1859-61. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 16th, 1862; Light-house Inspector, 
1862 ; special duty. New York, 1865. At present. Port Admiral at Phila- 
delphia. 



REAR ADMIRAL HIRAM PAULDING. 

Hiram Paulding was born in New York. Appointed Midshipman, Sep- 
tember 1st, 1811. Midshipman Paulding was present at the battle of Lake 
Champlain. Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 27th, 1816, and commanded 
schooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1834-36. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 9th, 1837. Commissioned as Cap- 
tain, February 29th, 1844 ; commanding sloop Vincennes, East India Squadron, 



22 EEAR ADMIRALS. 

1846 ; commanding frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850 ; Com- 
mandant Washington Navy Yard, 1853-55; commanding Home Squadron, 
1856-58 ; special duty, Wasliington, 1861. 

Commissioned Kear Admiral, July 16th, 1862'. 

In 1862, Admiral Paulding was ordered to the command of the N^w York 
Navy Yard, and in that position rendered important and efficient service to the 
government hy the energy he displayed in preparing ships for the different 
squadrons. No small portion of the efficiency of our Blockading Fleet 
wag due to the personal attention Admiral Paulding gave to the fitting and 
equipment of the vessels. In 1865, Admiral Paulding was relieved from this 
duty. Governor of Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1867-69. At present, Port 
Admiral at Boston. 



EEAR ADMIRAL THOMAS CRABBE. 

Thomas Crabbb is a native of Maryland. Appointed Midshipman, from 
Pennsylvania, November 15th, 1809. Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
4th, 1815, and as Commander, March 3d. 1835 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1837. Commissioned as Captain, September 
8th, 1841, and ordered to command frigate Brandy wine, Brazil Squadron; com- 
manding steam-sloop San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-53 ; com- 
manding squadron on Coast of Africa, 1855-57. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Prize Commissioner, Eastern 
District, Pennsylvania, 1864-65. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866. 



REAR ADMIRAL JOHN B. BIONTGOMERY. 

John B. Montgomery was born in New Jersey. Appointed Midshipman 
from the same State, June 4th, 1812. Commissioned as Lieutenant, April Igt, 
1818, and as Commander, December 9th, 1839 ; commanding Naval Rendez- 
vous, Boston, 1840 ; commanding sloop-of-war Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 
1845-48 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1850-51. Commissioned as Captain, Jan- 
uary 6th, 1853 ; commanding Pacific Squadron, 1860-61 ; Commandant Boston 
Navy Yard, 1862-63. Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; Com- 
mandant Navy Yard, Washington, 1864-65. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866. Commandant Naval 
Station, Saekett's Harbor, N. Y., 1867-69. 



REAR ADMIRAL CORNELIUS K. STRIBLING-. 

Cornelius K. Stribling was born in South Carolina. Appointed Midship- 
man from the same State, June 18th, 1812; serving on board the Macedonian 



REAR ADMIRALS. 23 

in the squadron under the command of Commodore Decatur, when the Algerine 
frigate and brig were captured, in 1815. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 1st, 1818. In April, 1823, Lieutenant 
Stribling commanded two barges, on the coast of Cuba, and after a running fight 
captured the piratical schooner Pilot; serving in frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1827, and in sloop Vincennes, same squadron, 1829-30; receiving- 
ship at Norfolk, 1833; ordnance duty, 1834-35; sloop-of-war Vincennes, 
Pacific Squadron, 1836 ; sloop-of-war Peacock, East India Squadron, 1837 ; ren- 
dezvous, Norfolk, 1840. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1840 ; commanding sloop-of-war Cyane, Pacific 
Squadron, 1843, and sloop-of-war Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1845; receiving- 
ship at Norfolk, 1846 ; attached to Pacific Squadron, 1847-48; commanding 
ship-of-the-line Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1850 ; superintendent of Naval Acade- 
my, 1851-53. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 1st, 1853 ; commanding sloop-of-war San 
Jacinto, special service, 1855; Commandant Pensacola Navy Yard, 1858; com- 
manding East India Squadron, 1860-61. 

In 1861, Captain Stribling was a member of the Board of Commissioners 
provided for by act of Congress of July 31, 1861, to examine and report as to 
compensation of all officers of the Government, and for other purposes. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July IBtE, 1862 ; member of Light-house 
Board, 1802; Commandant Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1863-64; commanding 
Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25, 1866 ; member of Light-house 
Board, 1867-69. 



REAR ADMIRAL JOSHUA R. SANDS. 

Joshua R. Sands was born in New York, and appointed Midshipman from 
the same State, June 18th, 1812. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 1st, 1818 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1827 ; 
sloop-of-war Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1829-30; rendezvous, New York. 
1835-37. 

Commissioned as Commander, February 23, 1840 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1843; receiving-ship at New York, 1849 ; commanding sloop-of-war Alleghany, 
East India Squadron, 1853. 

Commissioned as Captain, February 25th, 1854 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Susquehanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1857-58; commanding Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1860. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; Light-house Inspector, 
1862-66. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866; at present Port Admiral, 
Norfolk, Va. 



REAR ADJURAL CHARLES H. BELL. 

Charles H. Bell, born in New York, August 15th, 1798. Appointed Mid- 
shipman from the same State, June 18th, 1812 ; attached to Commodore De- 
catur's squadron all of 1813 and until the spring of 1814; in the summer of 



24 BEAB ADMIRALS. 

1814 was transferred to the squadron of Commodore Chauncey, on Lake Ontario, 
where he remained until the war ended; attached to Commodore Decatur's 
squadron, in the Mediterranean, in 1815. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 28th, 1820 ; serving in sloop-of-war Erie, 
West India Squadron, 1829 ; Navy ¥ard, New York, 1833 ; sloop Vincennes, 
Pacific Squadron, 1834-35; commanding schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 
1836. 

Commissioned ns Commander, September 10th, 1840, and ordered to command 
the schooner Dolphin, Brazil Squadron ; commanding sloop-of-war Yorktown, 
coast of Africa, 1846; Navy Yard, New York, 1850; special duty, 1851-54. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 12th, 1854; commanding frigate Constella- 
tion, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-58 ; Commandant Norfolk Navy Yard, 
1860. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1862-64 ; special duty, James river, 1865. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866 ; Commandant Navy Yard, 
1866-68. 



EEAR ADMIRAL LEVIN M. POWELL. 

Born in Virginia, and appointed Midshipman from the same State, March 
1st, 1817. _ 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, April 28th, 1826; attached to schooner Por- 
poise, Mediterranean Squadron, 1829, and to frigate Java, same squadron, 1830; 
West India Squadron, 1836-1837. 

Commissioned as Commander, June 24th, 1843, while on Coast Survey duty; 
Ordnance duty, 1845^7 ; commanding sloop-of-war John Adams, coast of 
Africa, 1849-50; Navy Yard, Washington, 1852-54. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
Portsmouth, Home Squadron, 1856; special duty, 1859; commanding frigate 
Potomac, Blockading Squadron, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Light-house Inspector, 
1863-66. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, 1869 ; at present on special duty at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



EEAR ADMIRAL CHARLES WILKES. 

Born in New York, and appointed from the same State January 1st, 1818 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant April 28, 1826; Exploring Expedition, 1829; 
special duty, 1830; Exploring Expedition, 1833; special duty, 1834-37; com- 
manding Exploring Expedition, 1840 ; Coast Survey, 1843-4. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 13th, 1843 ; special duty, 1845-60. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855, commanding sloop-of-war 
San Jacinto ; special service, 1861-62. While on this cruise Captain Wilkes 
took the rebel ministers. Mason and Slidell, from the English mail steamer 
Trent. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding special squad- 
ron to West Indies, 1863. While commanding this squadron Commodore Wilkes 



REAR ADMIRALS. 25 

did the country good service by capturing many blockade runners laden witb 
arms and munitions for the insurgents. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, July 25th, 1866, 



REAR ADMIRAL ANDREW H. HARWOOD. 

!BoRN in Pennsylvania, and appointed Blidshipman from the same State Jan- 
uary 21st, 1818. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827, vrhile attached to frigate Con- 
stitution, Mediterranean Squadron ; receiving-ship, at Philadelphia, 1829-30 ; 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1833 ; special duty 1835 ; schooner Shark, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1836-7; special duty, 1839; ordnance duty, 1843-52. 

Commissioned as Commander, October 2d, 1848 ; Mediterranean Squadron 
1853-55. 

Commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; ordnance duty, 1859-60; 
Chief of Bureau of Ordnance, IBGl. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; Commandant Washington 
Navy Yard, 1862-63 ; Secretary of Light-house Board, 1865-69. 

Commissioned as Rear-Admiral, 1809. At present, on special duiy at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



REAR ADMIRAL THEODORUS BAILEY.. 

Born in New York, and appointed Midshipman from that State, January 1st, 
1818. Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827 ; receiving-ship, at New 
York, 1829; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1834-36 ; special duty, 1837; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1840 ; frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1843 ; 
rendezvous. New York, 1846 ; commanding store-ship Lexington, 1847—48. 
While in command of the store-ship Lexington, during the Mexican war, ren- 
dered efficient and valuable aid, to the commander of the Pacific Squadron, by 
his energy, enterprise and gallantry in fitting out and leading numerous expedi- 
tions against the enemy. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 6th, 1849 ; commanding sloop-of-war 
St. Mary's, 1856-57. 

Commissioned as Captain, December 15th, 1855 ; commanded frigate Colorado, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-62. 

Captain Bailey was Farragut's second in command in the battle at New Or- 
leans, and led the attack and passage of the forts. He was officially commended 
by Admiral Farragut for his bravery and ability, and further complimented by 
being sent to Washington as the bearer of despatches, announcing the victory. 
Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 

Commodore Bailey, although his health was seriously impaired, asked for 
active duty, and in the Fall of 1862, was ordered to command the Eastern Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, where he displayed great energy and perseverance in his 
successful attempt to break up blockade running on the Florida coast. Com- 
mandant Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1865-67. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866. At present, on special 
duty at Washington, D. C. 



26 EEAE ADMIRALS. 

EEAR ADMIRAL JAMES L. LARDNEE. 

Born in tie State of Pennsylvania, and appointed Midstipman from the same 
State, July 28th, 1820. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, May 17th, 1828 ; attached to frigate Erandy- 
wine. Pacific Squadron, 1827-29, and the sloop-of-war Vincennes, same squad- 
ron, 1830 ; serving in frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834-35 ; 
special duty, 1837; Navy Yard, New York, 1840; frigate United States, Pa- 
cific Squadron, 1843 ; commanding receiving ship, at Philadelphia, 1846^8 ; 
commanding schooner Porpoise, coast of Africa, 1851-52. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 21st, 1851 ; commanding sloop-of- 
war Dale, coast of Africa, 1853 ; on duty at Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1854 ; 
special duty, 1858. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1860; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding Eastern Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1802; commanding West India Squadron, 1864 ; special 
duty, 1865-66. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, July 25th, 1866 ; at present. Governor Naval 
Asylum, Philadelphia. 



REAR ADMIRAL HENRY K. THATCHER. 

Born in the State of Maine and appointed Midshipman from there, March 
4th, 1823 ; frigate United States, Pacific Squadron; 1827 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, March 23d, 1829 ; schooner Experiment, Chesapeake Bay, 1833. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 28th, 1833 ; frigate Delaware, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1834-35 ; special duty, 1837 ; frigate Brandywine, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1840; receiving-ship at Boston, 1843-46; sloop-of-war 
Jamestown, African Squadron, 1847-50 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1851 ; command- 
ing store-ship Relief, 1852. 

Commissioned as Commander, 1855 ; on duty at Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 
1855-56 ; Pacific Squadron, 1857-59 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1860-61 ; com- 
missioned as Captain, 1861, and as Commodore, July 3d, 1862; commanded 
frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1863-63 ; cctomanded steam 
frigate Colorado, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-65 ; commanded Colorado and a 
Division of Porter's Squadron at the two attacks upon Fort Fisher, in December, 
1864, and January,1865. After the attack on Fort Fisher, Commodore Thatcher 
was appointed to the command of the Western Gulf Squadron, when he at once 
commenced active operations in co-operation with General Canby for the reduc- 
tion of Mobile ; after a brief and vigorous bombardment. Fort Alexis and Span- 
ish Fort were captured by the army on April 9th, 1865. With the key to Mo- 
bile thus secured, the out works of importance, batteries Tracy and Huger, 
were at the mercy of the assailants, and on the evening of the 11th, they were 
evacuated. The rebel troops evacuated Mobile on the following day. A formal 
surrender was demanded by General Granger, and Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher, 
which was complied with, and possession taken of the city. On the 10th of 
May, the rebel naval forces in the waters of Alabama surrendered to Acting 
Rear Admiral Thatcher. Sabine Pass and Galveston, the only remainin"- rebel 
fortified points on the Gulf Coast, soon capitulated, the first named on the 25th 
of May, and the latter on the 2d of June. 



COMMODORES. 27 

In tlie eavly part of 1866, Commodore Thatcher was relieved and ordered 
North. 

Commissioned Eear Admiral, July 25th, 1866; commanding North Pacific 
Sq[iiadron, 1867-68 ; at present, Port Admiral Portsmouth. New Hampshire. 



REAR ADMIRAL HENRY K. HOFP. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed Midshipman from South Carolina, October 
28th, 1823 ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1827. 

Promoted to Passed Blidshipman, March 23d, 1829 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, March 3d, 1831; frigate Potomac, Pacific Squadron, 1833-34; special 
duty, 1837; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1840; commanding store-ship Relief, 
1845 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1847 ; sloop-of-war St. Louis, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1850 ; rendezvous. New York, 1853. 

Commissioned as Commander, November 29th, 1853 ; commanding frigate 
Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1857 ; commanding sloop-of-war John Adams, 
Pacific Squadron, 1858; commanding receiving-ship at Philadelphia, 1859-60; 
commissioned as Captain, 1861. 

Commanding steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1861-62. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; special duty, 1863; ordnance 
duty, Philadelphia, 1864-67. 

Commissioned as Rear Admiral, April 13th, 1867 ; commanding North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-69. 

Rear Admiral Hoff gained much credit by his energetic and prompt measures 
to protect American citizens residing in Cuba, who had, in many instances, suf- 
fered injustice from the Spanish oflfioials. 

At present, on special duty at Washington, D. C. 



COMMODORE JOHN RODGERS. 

Born in Maryland, and appointed Midshipman from District of Columbia, 
April 18th, 1828. Attached to Frigate Constellation, Mediterranean squadron, 
1829-32; Naval School, Norfolk, 183-3-34; promoted to Passed Midshipman 
June 14th, 1834 ; on leave, 1835 ; brig Dolphin, Brazil squadron, 1836-38 ; 
special service, 1839. Commissioned as Lieutenant, January 22d, 1840; brig 
Boxer, Home Squadron, 1841^3 ; special service, 1844-45 ; sloop Marion, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1846— it ; Coast Survey, 1848-52; commanding 
steamer John Hancock, and Surveying and Exploring Expeditions to North 
Pacific and China Seas, 1853-56 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 
1855; special duty, Washington, D. C, 1857-59 ; waiting orders, 1860. 

In 1861 Commander Rodgers was ordered to special duty in the West, super- 
intending the construction of the Benton class of iron-clads. In 1862 he was 
assigned to the command of the iron-clad steamer Galena, and ordered to the 
North Atlantic blockading squadron. On the 10th of May, 1862, Commander 
Rodgers left Hampton Roads in command of an expedition of gun-boats, with 
orders to enter the James river, and, if possible, to ascend the river to Rich- 
mond. After two engagements with rebel batteries, which were in each in- 



28 COMMODORES. 

stance silenced, the fleet reached Port Darling, a easemated battery, erected on 
the crest of a hill, which, together with sunken vessels, effectually ob- 
structed the channel. 

On the morning of the ISth" of May, Commander Rodgers anchored the 
Galena in front of and at a distance of five hundred yards from the rebel fort. 
The Aroostook and Port-Royal, wooden gun-boats, were stationed eight hun- 
dred yards below the flag-ship. At 8 A. M., the vessels opened fire on Fort 
Darling, and from that time until 12 M. kept up a vigorous bombardment. At 
12.10 P. M., Commander Rodgers having expended every shot and shell in the 
magazine and shell-room of the Galena, made signal to withdraw from action, 
the vessels retiring in good order, and giving the rebels a parting-shot as they 
steamed down the river. The monitor being unable to give suf&oient elevation 
to her guns, and the Naugatuck, better known as the Stevens' battery, having 
burst her rifle gun at the first fire, were rendered useless, so far as the fort was 
concerned ; although both vessels did good service during the action by station- 
ing their crews as sharpshooters and picking off the rebel riflemen, who greatly 
annoyed the crews of the wooden vessels. 

The armor of the Galena did not prove of any service to her. She was hit 
one hundred and twenty-nine times, losing in killed and wounded two-thirds of 
her crew. The Aroostook and Port-Royal suffered to a less esteut. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862. 

In 1863 Captain Rodgers was ordered to the comman'd of the monitor Wee- 
hawken, and sailed from New York in that vessel for the South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron. On his way South, and while off the Delaware Breakwater, 
he encountered a heavy gale. He was urged to run in, and remain until the 
storm abated. This he declined to do, saying he wished to test the sea-going 
qualities of the monitors. The Weehawken rode out the gale, and reached 
Port-Royal in safety. 

On the 17th of June, 1863, in Warsaw Sound, Georgia, Captain Rodgers, in 
the Weehawken, encountered the powerful rebel iron-clad Atlanta, a vessel of 
much greater tonnage than the Weehawken. So confident were the rebels of a 
speedy victory, that the Atlanta was accompanied from Savannah to the scene 
of action by boats freighted with gay parties eager to witness the triumph of 
their vessel. Five shots were fired by the Weehawken. The fight lasted but 
fifteen minutes, at the end of which time the Atlanta surrendered. An impor- 
tant feature of this conflict was the final settlement of the dispute as to the 
value of the new fifteen-inch gun, which fully proved its merit. 

Commissioned as Commodore the 17th June, 1863 ; commanding iron-clad 
Dictator, special service, 1864-65; commanded monitor Monadnock, 1806-67, 
and in that vessel made the passage around the Horn to San Francisco. Com- 
modore Rodgers touched at Valparaiso, and witnessed the bombardment of that 
place by the Spanish fleet. 

Commanding Navy Yard, Boston, 1837-69. Now under orders to command 
the Asiatic squadron. 



COMMODORE JOHN A. WINSLOW. 

BOEN in North Carolina, November 9th, 1811; appointed Midshipman from 
same State, February 1st, 1827; attached to sloop-of-war Falmouth, West India 
Squadron, 1829-31; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th 1833 ■ Navv 
Yard, Boston, 1834; Brazil Squadron, 1835-37. ' ' 



OOMMODOEES. 29 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9th, 1839 ; steamer Missouri, Home 
Squadron, 1840-43; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1845-46. While 
attached to the Cumberland, Lieutenant Winslow was present at the attack on To- 
basco, and engaged in various skirmishes from Rio Grande River down the coast; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1848-49 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1852-55. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding rendezvous 
Boston, 1856-58; Light-house Inspector, 1860-61; Mississippi Flotilla, 1861-62 ; 
present at Fort Pillow, 1862, and engaged in various attacks and skirmishes 
with guerillas, in command of an expedition up White River, for the relief of 
G-eneral Curtis' army, in June, 1862. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding Kearsarge, special 
service, 1863-64. 

At 10.20 A. M., on Sunday, June 10th, 1864, the Kearsarge, while off the 
port of Cherbourg, France, discovered the piratical steamer Alabama, accom- 
panied by the English yacht Deerhound, standing out. Captain Winslow at 
once cleared his ship for action, and when the Alabama had reached the distance 
of seven miles from the shore, and was about nine hundred yards from the 
Kearsarge, the engagement commenced. 

Captain Winslow, fearing that his opponent would, in case of injury, steam in 
within the line of jurisdiction for protection, determined to run under her stern 
and rake. To avoid this, Semmes, the commander of the Alabama, sheered, 
and keeping broadside on to the Kearsarge, was forced into a circular track ; 
at the seventh rotation, the Alabama was disabled, and headed for the shore, 
another sbot brought down the rebel flag, and a white one was run up; at 12.10 
an officer from the Alabama came along side the Kearsarge and surrendered his 
vessel, which was reported in a sinking condition, and at 12.30 P. M., the Ala- 
bama went down. Capt. Semmes escaped to the shore in the English yacht 
Deerhound, as did many of his officers and men. The remainder were picked 
up by the boats of the Kearsarge and taken on board that vessel. Three of the 
crew of the Kearsarge were wounded. The total number of killed and wounded 
on the Alabama has never been given. Seventeen of her wounded men were 
picked up by the boats of the victorious vessel. 

The battery of the Kearsarge consisted of seven guns ; two eleven-inch, Dahl- 
gren, one 30-pounder rifle, and four light 32-pounders. That of the Alabama 
consisted of eight guns, one heavy 68-pounder, of 9000 pounds weight ; one 
100-pounder rifle, and six heavy 32-pounders. 

For this gallant action, the only sea fight of the war, Captain Winslow was 
promoted to the grade of Commodore, his commission dating June 19th, 1864. 
In 1866, Commodore Winslow was ordered to the command of theGrulf Squad- 
ron, which he retained until 1867; at present, Commandant of the Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 



COMMODORE SAMUEL PHILLIPS LEE. 

Born in Virginia, February 13th, 1812. Appointed Midshipman from his 
native State, Nov. 22d, 1825; attached to frigate Java, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1828-32 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1833 ; frigate 
Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1834-35, and to sloop Vincennes, same Squad- 
ron, 1836-37. 



30 COMMODORES. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9tli, 1837; attached to West India 
Squadron, 1889-42; Coast Survey, 1841^4 ; Pensacola Navy Yard, 1845-46 ; 
Coast Survey, 1847-51 ; commanding brig Dolphin, special service, 1852 ; Hy- 
drographical duty, 1852-54 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1855. 

Commissioned as Commander, Sept. 14th, 1855 ; special service, 1856-60. 

In 1861 Commander Lee was ordered to command the sloop-of-war Oneida, and 
in that vessel took part in the attack and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, and the various battles on the Mississippi from New Orleans to Vioks- 
burg ; winning a high reputation for gallantry and devotion to duty. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862, and ordered to the command of 
the N. A. B. Squadron, with the rank of Acting Rear Admiral. While in 
command of the N. A. B. Squadron, he greatly harassed the enemy by numer- 
ous expeditions up the navigable streams within the limits of his squadron. 
He was at all times ready to co-operate with the army, and on more than one 
occasion the presence of his vessels saved the military forces from serious disas- 
ter. Wilmington, N. C, was the most difficult port on the coast to blockade, 
but Acting Rear Admiral Lee, by a wise distribution of the vessels of his squad- 
ron, made the blockade as eflfeotive as it was possible to make it. In the sum- 
mer of 1§64, Acting Rear Admiral Lee, was transferred to the command of the 
Mississippi Squadron. In December of the same year, he rendered good service to 
the country, by keeping open the Cumberland river at the time Hood's army was 
advancing on Nashville, and when the safety of the army under General Thomas 
depended in a great measure upon reinforcements and supplies reaching them 
promptly; the rail road communication between Louisville and Nashville having 
been interrupted, the Cumberland river was the only channel of commu- 
nication. 

During this campaign. Admiral Lee was several times under fire, and for his 
services received a vote of thanks from Congress. 

In 1865, the Mississippi Squadron was disbanded and most of the vessels 
sold, Captain Lee being ordered East. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866; in 1866-7, Commodore Lee 
was President of the Board to examine volunteer officers for admission into the 
regular Navy; at present, on special duty at Washington, D. C. 



COMMODORE OLIVER S. GLISSON. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed Midshipman from Indiana, November 1st, 1826 ; 
attached to sloop-of-war Erie, West India Squadron, 1829-32; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1832-35 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1836 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, February 9, 1837 ; rendezvous, Norfolk, 1837-38 ; sloop Fairfield, 
Brazil Squadron, 1839-42 ; sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1843-44; sloop 
Saratoga, Brazil Squadron, 1845-46 ; commanding schooner Reefer, Home 
Squadron, 1847 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1848-50 ; special duty, 1851-52 ; steam 
frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1853-55. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding store-ship 
John P. Kennedy, East India Squadron, 1856; Naval Asylumn, Philadelphia, 
1857-60 -^ commanding steamer Mount Vernon, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861 ; com- 
missioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam sloop Iroquois, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steam sloop Mohican, 



COMMODOEES. 31 

special service, 1863-4 j commanding steamer Santiago de Cuba, 1864-5 ; pre- 
sent at the two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866; commanding Naval Station, 
League Island, Pennsylvania, 1868-9. 



COMMODORE MELANCTHON SMITH. 

Born in New York, May 24th, 1810. Appointed Midshipman from same 
State, March 1st, 1826; attached to schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 
1827-29 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830-31 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, April 28th, 1832; attached to sloop-of-war St. Louis, West India 
Squadron, 1833; schooner Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1834-35; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1836. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8th, 1837; Navy Yard, New York, 
1836-37; sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1837-38 ; attached to steamer 
Poinsett, coast of Florida, during the Florida war; attached to sloop Fairfield, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-43; sloop Vandalia, Home Squadron, 1845; 
attached to steamer Colonel Harney, 1846; Pensacola Navy Yard, 1847; frigate 
Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-51 ; waiting orders, 1852-54. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; Light-house Inspector, 
1856-60; commanding steamer Massachusetts, 1861; engaged with rebel 
steamer F'lorida, Mississippi Sound, October 26th, 1861 ; in 1862, commanding 
steam-sloop Mississippi, in which vessel he passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
April 24th, 1862. 

Flag Officer Farragut, in his official report, says : " Just as the scene appeared 
to be closing, thtj ram Manassas was seen coming up, under full speed, to attack 
•us. I directed Captain Smith in the Blississippi to turn and run her down. The 
order was instantly obeyed by the Mississippi turning and going at her at full 
speed. Just as we expected to see the ram annihilated, when within fifty yards 
of each other, she had put her helm hard aport, dodged the Mississippi, and 
ran ashore. The Mississippi poured two broadsides into her, and sent her drift- 
ing down the river, a total wreck. Thus closed our morning's fight." 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862. Captain Smith remained in the 
Mississippi, taking part in all engagements of the squadron, until March 14th, 
1863, when, in attempting the passage of the batteries at Port Hudson, the 
Blississippi grounded, and heeled over to port. Every efiFort was made to get 
the vessel off, but without avail ; and the enemy, having obtained the exact range 
of the ship, were hulling her at almost every shot, when Captain Smith gave 
orders to fire her, which was done in four dificrent places aft, between decks. 
When the flames had gained sufficient headway to render the destruction of 
his vessel certain, he gave orders to abandon her, which was done quietly and 
.without confusion. Captain Smith being the last man to leave. 

By his cool and courageous bearing in the trying situation in which he was 
placed. Captain Smith won the admiration of all, and his course was approved 
by both Rear Admiral Farragut and the Department, 

Commanding steam-sloop Onondaga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864 ; engaged with rebel ram Albemarle, in Albemarle Sound, and capture of 
steamer Bombshell, May 5th, 1864 ; commanded the frigate Wabash in two 
attacks on Fort Fisher— the first, December 24th and 25th, 1864; the second. 



32 COMMODORES. 

January 14tli, 15tli, and 16th, 1865 ; Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1866. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866. 

In 1866, Commodore Smith was appointed Chief of the JBureau of Equipment 
and Recruiting, Navy Department. 



COMMODORE CHARLES S. BOGGS. 

Born in New Jersey, January 28th, 1811. Appointed Midshipman from 
the same State November 1st, 1826; attached to sloop-of-war Warren, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1829-32 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 1832 ; 
receiving-ship at New York, 1832-35 ; rendezvous, New York, 1836. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 6th, 1837. Sloop Saratoga, coast of 
Africa, 1840-43. Was an active participant in the burning of five villages on 
the coast ; Home Squadron, 1846-47 ; present at the siege of Vera Cruz ; com- 
manded the boat expedition from the Princeton that destroyed the U. S. brig 
Truxton after her surrender to the Mexicans ; receiving-ship at New York, 
1848-51; Navy Yard, New York, 1852-54; Inspector, etc.. New York, 1855.^ 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding mail 
steamer Illinois, 1856-58; Light-house Inspector, 1860-61; commanded sloop- 
of-war Varuna, at the passage of forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24th, 
1862. 

The Varuna was the only one pf Farragut's squadron lost at the battle of New 
Orleans. She was attacked by two of the rebel rams and badly damaged, and 
her Commander finding his vessel sinking, ran her into the bank and made fast 
to the trees. Captain Boggs fought his vessel gallantly to the last. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 186"2 ; commanding steam sloop Juni- 
ata, 1863 ; special duty. New York, 1864-68. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steamer De 
Sota, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-68 ; special duty, 1869. 



COMBIODORE HENRY WALKE. 



Born in Virginia, December 24th, 1809. Appointed Midshipman from Ohio, 
February 1st, 1827 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Jlediterranean Squadron, 
1828-31 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1832—3 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 10th, 1833 ; attached to receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1835-6 ; ship-of-the- 
line North Carolina, Pacific Squadron, 1837-9. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9th, 1839 ; receiving-ship. New 
York, 1840-2 ; sloop Boston, East India Squadron, 1842-4 ; brig Bainbridge, 
Brazil Squadron, 1845 ; Home Squadron, 1847 ; present at capture of Tobasco» 
and Tuspan, 1847 ; frigate Cumberland, Jlediterranean Squadron, 1848-51 ; 
receiving-ship. New York, 1852-^ ; commissioned as Commander, September 
14th, 1855; commanding store-ship Supply, 1860-61. 

In 1861, Commander Walke was ordered to the Mississippi Flotilla, and com- 
manded the Carondolet at the battle of Belmont, November 7th, 1861, and the 
battles of Fort Henry, February 6th, 1862, and Fort Donaldson, February 13th, 
14th and 16th, 1862 ; battle of Island No. 10, March 17th, 1862; passed rebel 



COMMODORES. 33 

batteries at Island No. 10, April 4tli, 1862; captured rebel batteries opposite 
Point Pleasant, and spiked the guns, April 6th, 1862 ; battle of Fort Pillow, 
May 11th, 1862 ; battle 'of Memphis, June 6, 1862; engagement between the 
Carondolet and rebel ram Arkansas ; Yazoo River, July 15th, 1862. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862. 

Passed rebel batteries at Vicksburg, April 16, 1863; battle of Grand Gulf, 
April 29th, 1863 ; dispersed the rebel force under General Taylor from Simms- 
port, Atchafalaya. River, June 4th, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Sacramento, 
special service, 1864-5. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866. 

In 1868, Commodore Walke was ordered to the command of the Naval Station 
at Mound City, Illinois. 



COMMODORE THORNTON A. JENKINS. 

Born in Virginia, December 11th, 1811. Appointed Midshipman from the 
same State, November 1st, 1828 ; attached to sloop-of-war Natchez, Westlndia 
Squadron, 1830-31; sloop Vandalia, West India .Squadron, 1832-33; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1834 ; Coast Survey, 1836-41 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, December 9th, 1839 ; attached to frigate Congress, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1842—45 ; present at capture of Buenos Ayrean Squadron off Montevideo, 
September 29th, 1844; special service, 1846. Commanding store-ship Relief, 
Home Squadron, 1847. Present at Tuspan and Tobasco; Coast Survey, 1848- 
52 ; Secretary of Light-house Board, 1853-58 ; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; commanding sloop Preble, Brazil Squadron, and Para- 
guay Expedition, 1859-60 ; Secretaj-y of Light-house Board, 1861; commis- 
sioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Wachusett, 1862 ; 
senior officer present at repulse of the rebels at Coggens' Point, James River, 
and at the attack of the enemy on the flotilla, ofif City Point, James River, 
August, 1862; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, in the fall of 1862, and present as Fleet Captain of Farragut's 
squadron at passage of Port Hudson, March 14th, 1863, Grand Gulf Batteries, 
March 19th, 1863; Warrenton, March 21st, 23d, 25th and 28th, 1863; Grand 
Gulf, March 30th, 1863, and attack on Port Hudson, May 24th, 27th and 28th, 
1863 ; eummanding steam-sloop Richmond, at surrender of Port Hudson, July 
9th, 1863, and at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864. Admiral Fara- 
gut, in his detailed report of the affair, thus speaks of Captain Jenkins : " Be- 
fore closing this report, there is one other officer of my squadron of whom I 
feel bound to speak, Captain T. A. Jenkins, of the Richmond, who was formerly 
my chief of staff, not because of his having held that position, but because he 
never forgets to do his duty to the government, and takes now the same interest 
in the fleet as when he stood in that relation to me. He is also commanding 
officer of the second division of my squadron, and, as such, has shown ability 
and the most untiring zeal. He carries out the spirit of one of Lord Colling- 
wood's best sayings — ' Not to be afraid of doing too much; those who are, sel- 
dom do as much as they ought.' When in Pensacola, he spent days on the bar, 
placing buoys in the best position, was always looking after the interests of the 
service, and keeping the vessels from being detained in port one moment more 
than necessary. The gallant Craven told me only the night before the action 
in which he lost his life, ' I regret, Admiral, that I have detained you ; but 
had it not been for Captain Jenkins, God knows when I should have been here. 
3 



34 COMMODORES. 

When your order came I had not received an ounce of coal.' I feel that I 
should not be doing my duty if I did not call the attention of the Department 
to an officer who has performed all his various duties with so much zeal and 
fidelity." 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866. In 1866, Commodore Jen- 
kins was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Navigation and Detail^ and held that 
position until 1869. At present, Secretary of Light-house Board. 



COMMODOKE JOHN B. MARCHAND. 

Born in Pennsylvania, August 27, 1808. Appointed Midshipman, from 
same State, May 1st, 1828 ; attached to sloop-of-war Ontario, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1830-32 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1833 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, 1834; frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7; sloop 
John Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
January 29, 1840; from August, 1841, to August, 1842, Lieutenant Mar- 
chand was in command of the United States Steamer Van Buren, and was ope- 
rating with his crew, in canoes, in the everglades of Florida against the hostile 
Seminole Indians ; brig Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 1843 ; frigate Brandy- 
wine, East India Squadron, 1844-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1846 ; Home 
Squadron, 1847 ; engaged in bombardment of Vera Cruz, and participated in 
the attack upon and capture of Tuspan, 1847 ; attached to sloop St. Marys, 
East India Squadron, 1848-50 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1851-2 ; frigate 
Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; Bureau of Construction, Navy Department, 1S56-8; 
commanding steamer Memphis, Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60 ; Light-House 
Inspector, 1861 ; commanding steamer James Adger, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862 ; participated in the capture of Fernandina, March, 
1862 ; slightly wounded on the 16th of March, 1862, by a rifle ball from the 
enemy while reconnoitering in the Stono River ; commissioned as Captain, 
July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Lackawanna, Western Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863-4'; commanded the Lackawanna, battle of Mobile Bay, 
and assisted to capture the rebel ram Tennessee, August 5, 1864 ; special duty, 
1865 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 25, 
1866; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867; special duty, 1868; at pre- 
sent. Commandant Navy Yard, Philadelphia. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM ROGERS TAYLOR. 

Born in Rhode Island, November 7th, 1811. Appointed Midshipman from 
same State, April 1st, 1828 ; attached to sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron 
1829-32 ; Naval School, New York, 1833-4. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1834; receiving-ship. New York, 1835; 
sloop Peacock, East India Squadron, 1836-8. 

When the sloop Peacock ran ashore on the Island of Madeira, in 1836, 
Passed Midshipman Taylor was sent to Muscat, in command of a cutter, to coa 
vey the diplomatic agent, Edmund Roberts, Esq., to that place, with some rati- 



COMMODORES. 35 

fied treaties wliicli lie was charo;ed to exchange. It was a sea voyage of five 
dajs' duration, attended with eonsiderable peril, from bad weather and the Arab 
pirates, some of whom chased them ^for several hours. The Arabian sloop-of- 
war Sultana was sent to render assistance to the Peacock. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 10th, 1840 ; brig Oregon, survey of 
Tampa Bay, 1842-3 ; sloop St. Marys, Home Squadron, during Mexican war; 
engaged at Tampioo Bar, June 8th and June 15th, 1846 ; present at siege of 
Vera Cruz, and commanded an eight-inch gun in the Naval Battery ; Naval 
Asylum, Philadelphia, 1848-50 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; 
ordnance duty, 1853-5 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; 
ordnance duty, 1857-9 ; ordnance duty, Washington, D. C, 1861; commis- 
sioned as Captain, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steam sloop-of-war Housatonic, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Senior officer off Charleston, at time of unsuccessful attack upon the blockad- 
ing vessels by rebel rams Chocura and Palmetto ; present as Fleet Captain with 
Admiral Dahlgren, during all the operations against Morris Island, from July 
10th to 19th, 1853, and was in battle with Forts Wagner and Sumpter, on 
board the monitor Catskill on the 10th, and again on board the monitor Montauk, 
on the 18th July, 1863 ; commanded steam-sloop Juniata, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5, and was present upon both attacks upon Fort 
Fisher. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866 ; ordnance duty 1866-7. 

At present, commanding Northern Squadron, Pacific Fleet. 



COMMODOKB BENJAMIN F. SANDS. 

Born in Maryland, February 11th, 1812. Appointed Midshipman, from 
Kentucky, April Ist, 1828 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 
1830-32; sloop St. Louis, West India Squadron, 1833-34. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1834; Coast Survey, 1836-41. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, March 16th, 1840; frigate Columbus, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1842-44; special duty, 1845; Naval Observatory, 1846; 
Home Squadron, 1847 ; Passage up Tobasco river, and Tobasco, June 15th, 
1847 ; sloop Yorktown, coast of Africa, 1848-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851-58. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; Bureau of Construc- 
tion, 1859-60; commanding Coast Survey steamer Active, 1861-62. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Daco- 
tah. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; engagement with Fort Caswell, 
February 23d, 1863 ; commanding steamer Fort Jackson, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-65 ; present at both attacks upon Fort Fisher; on block- 
ade of Wilmington from November, 1862, to February, 1865; blockade of Gal- 
veston from February to July, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1866 ; 
appointed Superintendent Naval Observatory, 1867. 



COMMODOKB CHARLES STEEDMAN. 

Born in South Carolina, September 24th, 1811. Appointed Midshipman 
from South Carolina, April 1st, 1828 ; attached to Naval Station, New York, 



36 COMMODORES. 

1830 ; Naval Station, Norfolk, 1833 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, Janu- 
ary 14th, 1834 ; schooner Grampus, West India Squadron, 1834-5 ; frigate 
Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1836-8 ; sloop-of-war Macedonian, West 
India Squadron, 1840. Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; 
sick leave, 1843 ; sloop St. Marys, Home Squadron, 1845-7 ; commanded 
a gun in Naval Battery at the bombardment of Vera Cruz ; frigate Cumber- 
land, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-51 ; Naval Observatory, 1853-5. _ Com- 
missioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; special duty, Washington, 
1857-8 ; commanding brig Dolphin, Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60 ; Light- 
house Inspector, 1861 ; commanded Bienville, at the battle of Port Royal, 
South Carolina, November 7th, 1861 ; with the Paul Jones and other gunboats 
under his command engaged Fort McAllister, on the Ogeeohee river, in 
August. 1862; on the 17th of September, 1862, engaged and silenced the bat- 
teries of St. John's Bluff, on St. John's river, Florida; on the 30th of Septeni- 
ber following, with the same command, co-operated with General Bannon in 
the capture of the same batteries, and with the naval force under his command 
opened and held the St. John's river to Lake Beaufort. Commissioned as Cap- 
tain, September 13th, 1862 ; commanded the sloop-of-war Ticonderoga in the 
two attacks upon Fort Fisher, December 1864, and January, 1865. Commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866, commanding sloop-of-war Ticonderoga, 
European Squadron, 1866-7 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



COBIMODORE JAMES ALDEN. 

Born in Maine. Appointed Midshipman from same State, lat April, 1828; 
attached to Naval Station, Boston, Massachusetts, 1829-30-31 ; sloop-of-war 
John Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1832-33. Promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 14th, 1834; Navy Yard, Boston, 1835; Exploring Expedition, 
1839-42. Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; Naval Station, 
Boston, 1843 ; frigate Constitution, East India Squadron, 1845 ; Home Squad- 
ron during Mexican war ; present at Vera Cruz, Tuspan, and Tobasco ; Naval 
Station, Boston, 1847 ; Coast Survey, 1848-1860. Commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; commanding steamer South Carolina in the early part 
of 1861 ; commanding steam-sloop Richmond at passage of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip, and engagement with Chalmette batteries and defences of New Or- 
leans ; passage of the Vioksburg batteries twice ; Port Hudson, 1862-63. Com- 
missioned as Captain, January 2d, 1863, commanding the steam-sloop Brooklyn 
in the action with Forts Morgan and Gaines and rebel gunboats in Mobile Bay ; 
commanded the Brooklyn in the two attacks upon Fort Fisher. Captain Alden 
participated and took a prominent part in nearly all the great naval battles of 
the war, and in every instance was handsomely mentioned in the official report. 
Pie has probably seen more hard fighting than any other officer of his grade. 
Commissioned as Commodore, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Sus- 
quehanna, special service, 1867 ; commanding steam-frigate Minnesota, special 
service, 1867-68 ; Commandant Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 1868-69. 
In April, 3869, Commodore Alden was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Navi- 
gation and Detail, Navy Department. 



COMMODOEES. 37 

COMMODORE ALFRED TAYLOR. 

Born in Virginia, May 23d, 1812. Appointed Midshipman, from same 
State, January 1st, 1825; ship-of-the-line North Carolina, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1826-9 ; sloop-of-war Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830-32 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1833; Navy Yard, Boston, 1834; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 
1835-6. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9th, 1837; sloop Cyane, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1840-42; Navy Yard, Washington, 1843; sloop Boston, 
Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 
duripg Mexican war ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1848-51 ; steam-sloop Missis- 
sippi, East India Squadron, 1853-5 ; commissioned as Commander, September 
14, 1855. 

Commanding rendezvous, New York, 1856-8. 

Commanding sloop Saratoga, 1861. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862. 

Navy Yard, Boston, 1862-5; commanding Flag-ship Susquehanna, Brazil 
Squadron, 1866; commissioned as Commodore, September, 27th, 1866; Light- 
house Inspector, 1868-9. 



COMMODORE SIMON B. BISSELL. 

Born in Vermont, October 28. Appointed Midshipman from New Hamp- 
shire, November 6th, 1824 ; sloop-of-war Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1826-29 ; 
Pensacola Navy Yard, 1830 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; 
frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1838-4; frigate Delaware, 
same Squadron, 1835-6 ; receiving-ship at Boston, 1837. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9th, 1837; steamship Fulton, Atlantic 
coast, 1840 ; steamer Missouri, Home Squadron, 1843 ; sloop Albany, Home 
Squadron, during the war with Mexico ; present at the siege of Vera Cruz ; 
stationed at the Naval Battery; unemployed from 1848-58. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding receiving 
ship Mare Island, California, 1860 ; commanding sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 
1861-62. 

Commissioned Captain, July 16th, 1862; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Califor- 
nia, 1863-64. 

Commissioned as Commodore, October 10th, 1866. 

Commanding sloop-of-war Monongahela, N. A. Squadron, 1866-7 ; special 
service, 1869. 



COMMODORE JOHN R. GOLDSBOROUGH. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed Midshipman from District of 
Columbia, November 6th, 1824 ; attached to ship-of-the-line, North Carolina, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1829 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 
1832 ; sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 1834 ; sloop Natchez, Brazil Squadron, , 
1835; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1836. 



38 COMMODOEES. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, Sept. 6tli, 1837 ; attached to ship-of-the-Iine 
North Carolina, Pacific Squadron, 1837 ; waiting orders, 1840 ; frigate Colum- 
bus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843 ; coast s-urvey, 1845-50 ; sloop Saratoga, 
East India Squadron, 1851-4 ; commissioned as Commander, Sept. 14th, 1855 
commanding rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1856-8; waiting orders, 1859-60 ; com^ 
manding steamer Union, 1861; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 
commanding steamer Florida, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; com^ 
manding steam frigate Colorado, Western Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 
ordnance duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1864^5; commanding steam sloop 
Shenandoah, East India Squadron, 1866-8; commissioned as Commodore, April 
13th, 1867; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



COMMODOKE THEODORE P. GREENE. 

Born in Vermont, July 4th, 1810. Appointed Midshipman from Vermont, 
November 1st, 1826; attached to Naval Station, Boston, 1827-29; sloop War- 
ren, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830-32 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1832 ; 
sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1834-36. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
December 20th, 1837 ; razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1840 ; frigate 
Congress, Pacific Squadron, ] 846; frigate Congress, East India Squadron, 1847 ; 
sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1852-53 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1854-56. Com- 
missioned as Commander, Sept. 14tli, 1855 ; Light-house Inspector, 1858-60 ; 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1861-62. Commissioned as Captain, 
July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Richmond, Western Gulf Squadron, 
1865; ordnance duty, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866; commanding steam- 
sloop Powhattan, Pacific Squadron, 1867. Commissioned as Commodore, July 
24th, 1867 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1868-69. 



COMMODORE JOSEPH F. GREEN. 

Born in Maine, November 24th, 1811. Appointed Midshipman, from same 
State, November 1st, 1827 ; attached to sloop-of-war Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 
1830 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1833 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
10th, 1833 ; frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-6-7 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, February 28th, 1838; sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 
1840 ; frigate Columbus, Brazil Squadron, 1843-5 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1846; 
ship-of-the-line Ohio, Pacific Squadron, during all of the Mexican war. Lieu- 
tenant Green took part in all of the important actions on the Pacific Coast. 
He remained in the Ohio until 1850; Navy Yard, Boston, 1851-2; ordnance 
duty, 1853-4 ; Naval Academy, 1855-8 ; commissioned as Commander, Sep- 
tember 14th, 1855; waiting orders, 1859-60; ordnance duty, 1861; commis- 
sioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; participated in the bombard- 
ment of Fort Wagner; ordnance duty, Boston Navy Yard, 1866-8; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July, 24th, 1867; special duty, 1869. 



COMMODORES. 39 

COMMODORE AUGUSTUS L. CASE. 

Born in New York. Appointed Midshipman from the same State, April 
Ist^ 1828 ; attaclied to frigate Nelson, Brazil Squadron, 1830-32 ; sloop-of-war 
St. Louis, West Indies, 1833; on leave, 1831-36; bark Pioneer, 1837; Ex- 
ploring Expedition, 1840; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; 
frigate Brandywine, East India Squadron, 1845; waiting orders, 1846; sloop- 
of-"war Germantown, Home Squadron, 1847. 

After Commodore Case had taken possession of Laguna, he was despatched 
in a "Bungo," with one of the brig Porpoise's 42-pounder cannonades mounted 
on the bow, with Midshipman P. K. Murray, and twenty-five men, up the 
Palisade River to the town of the same name, which he captured and held for 
a fortnight against a large body of cavalry, which almost daily threatened an 
attack. Lieutenant Case was present at Vera Cruz and capture of Tobasco 
during the war with Mexico. 

Sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1848-51; commanding sloop Warren, 
1852-53 ; Light-house Inspector, 1854-5-6-7 ; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; waiting orders, 1858; commanding steamer Caledonia, 
Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; waiting orders, 1860; com- 
manding steam-frigate Minnesota, 1861-2; engaged Forts Clarke and Hatteras, 
August 28th and 29th, 1861 ; took part in the battle of Roanoke Island, Feb- 
ruary 7th and 8th, 18G2; commanding steam-sloop Iroquois, N. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1863. 

Commodore Case had charge nf the blockade of New Inlet, N. C, and was 
engaged in cutting out steamer Kate from under the batteries at New Inlet. 
In this exploit he was aided by steamer James Adger, Commander T. H. 
Patterson, and Mt. Vernon, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant James Strathan. 

Commissioned as Captain, January 2d, 1863; special duty, Washington, 
D. C., 1863-4; Navy Yard, New York, 1865; Fleet Captain European Squad- 
ron, 1866-7-8 ; Light-house Inspector, 1868 ; commissioned as Commodore, 
December 8, 1867 ; at present. Light-house Inspector. 



COMMODORE ALEXANDER M. PENNOCK. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Tennessee, April 1st, 1828 ; frigate 
Guerriere, Pacific Squadron, 1829-30; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1833; sloop 
Natchez, Brazil Squadron, 1834; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 
1834, and ordered to frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron; frigate Colum- 
bia, East India Squadron, 1839; promoted to Lieutenant, March 25th, 1839 ; 
sloop Decatur, Brazil Squadron, 1843; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1846; store-ship 
Supply, 1848; sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 1850-2; Light-house In- 
spector, 1853-6; commissioned as Commander, December 15th, 1855; special 
duty, connected with steam frigate Niagara, 1857 _; commanding steamer South- 
ern Star, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60; Light-house In- 
spector, 1861. 

In 1862, Commander Pennock was ordered to duty as Fleet Captain of the 
Mississppi Squadron, where he remained until the fall of 1864, gaining a repu- 
tation for executive ability of the highest order. 

Commissioned as Captain, Jan. 2d, 1863 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866-67 ; 
commanding frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, May 6th, 18'68 ; in charge European Squadron, 1869. 



40 COJIMODOEES. 

COMMODORE JOHN L. WOEDEN. 

BoEN in New York, March 12tli, 1818. Appointed from New York, January 
12fh, 1835 ; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1836-37 ; NavarSchool, Philadelphia, 
1840 ; promoted to Passed Jlidshipman, July 16th, 1840 ; store-ship Fielief, 
Pacific Squadron, 1843; special duty, 1845; Naval Observatory, 1846; store- 
ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
November 30th, 1846 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1848-50 ; Naval Ob- 
servatory, Washington, 1851-52; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1853-55 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1857-58 ; sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1859 ; Home Squadron, 1860. 
Commanded iron-clad "Monitor" in her engagement with rebel iron-clad 
" Merrimac," in Hampton Roads, March 9th, 1862. On 8th of March, 1862, 
the Merrimac came down from Norfolk, and engaged the Congress' and Cum- 
berland, then lying off Newport News, and after a brief action destroyed those 
vessels. The 5lerrimac then steamed up the Elizabeth river, and it was feared 
that on the following day the steam frigates Minnesota and Roanoke, then lying 
in Hampton Roads, would share the fate of the Cumberland. At this juncture 
of affairs the Monitor arrived, and when the Merrimac steamed into the Roads 
on the 9th, it was to find an adversary of different metal from that of the ships 
so easily destroyed the day before. At 8.45 A. M., the Monitor opened fire on 
the Merrimac, and continued the action until 12.15 P. M., when the Merrimac 
retreated to Sewell's Point. During the action Captain Worden was injured in 
the eyes, by the explosion of a shell from the Merrimac upon the outside of the 
eye-hole of the pilot-house exactly opposite his eye. 

Commifsioned as Commander, July 12th, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad 
steamer Montauk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; commanded the iron- 
clad Montauk in the blockading fleet in Ossabaw Sound, and engaged Fort 
McAllister on the Ogeechee river, January 27th, 1863, and again, February 
1st, 1863 ; attacked and destroyed the rebel privateer Nashville under the guns 
of Fort McAllister, on the 28th of February, 1863 ; commanded the Montauk 
in the attack made by Admiral Du Pont, with the iron-clad fleet, on the defences 
of Cha-leston, on the 7th of April, 1863 ; commissioned as Captain, February 
od, looo. 

Captain Worden was promoted out of the line as a reward for distinguished 
gallantry in the engagement with the Merrimack, and in other battles in which 
he had taken part. 

Special duty. New York, 1864-66 ; commanded the steam-sloop Pensacola, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; special duty, 1868 ; commissioned as Commo- 
dore, May 27th, 1868. At present. Superintendent Naval Academy, at Anna- 
polis. 



COMMODORE GEORGE F. EMMONS. 

Born in Vermont, August 23d, 1811. Appointed from Vermont, April 1st, 
1828; Naval School, New York, 1829-30; serving in frigate Brandywine, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1831-33; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
14th, 1834; bark Consort, Coast Survey, 1837 ; Exploring Expedition, 1838-42 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
1843; sloop Boston, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6; ship-of-the-line Ohio, Pacific 
Squadron, 1847. 



COMMODOEES. 41 

DuriQg the war with Mexico, employed on the Pacific side on ship and on 
shore in Upper and Lower California; was sent as bearer of despatches to 
General Mason in the Sierra Nevada. In several engagements with natives of 
the Pacific Coast. 

_ Store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1848-50; Bureau of Construc- 
tion, Navy Department, 1851-53 ; frigate Savannah, Brazil Squadron, 1854-6 ; 
commissioned as Commander, January 28th, 1856 ; waiting orders, 1856-59 • 
member of Light-house Board, 1861; commanding steamer Hatteras, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862, and commanding steamer K. R. Cuyler, 
same squa,dron, 18G3; captured Cedar Keys, West Coast of Florida, 1862, and 
Pass Christian, Mississippi; took some twenty prizes, some of which were 
burned or destroyed, among the latter the rebel ram Webb, which was fired 
into on passing New Orleans, and then chased on shore and burned, and 
officers and crew captured; commissioned as Captain, February 7th, 1863 • 
commanding steam-sloop Lackawanna, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5. 

Present at battle with the rebel force in the attempt to destroy the shipping 
and city of New Orleans, 1865, in which both were saved and several millions of 
Government property, principally through the exertions of the officers and 
crew of the Lackawanna, at the time under his command. 

Commanding steam-sloop Ossippee, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-68; 
commissioned as Commodore, September 20th, 1868 ; at present, senior mem- 
ber of Ordnance Board. 



COMMODORE EDWARD MIDDLETON. 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed from same State, July 1st, 1828 ; 
schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 1829-30 ; sloop Vandalia, West India 
Squadron, 1832-34 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1834; frigate 
Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-38 ; sloop Marion, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1839-41; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1844-45; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1846; 
steamer Princeton, 1847 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1848 ; receiving-ship, Phi- 
ladelphia, 1849-50; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1851; receiving-ship, New 
York, 1853; executive officer of sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1854-5^-56; 
operating against a combination of hostile Indians of the various tribes of Wash- 
ington and Oregon Territories, during the war of the winter of 1865-06 ; at- 
tacks upon Seattle, Washington Territory, January 26th, 1856; commissioned 
as Commander, January 26th, 1856 ; commanding sloop Decatur, 1857 ; com- 
manding sloop St. Marys, Pacific Sqitadron, 1861-65 ; commissioned as Captain, 
April 24th, 1863 ; special duty. New York, 1866; Navy Yard, Blare Island. 
California, 1868 ; commissioned as Commodore, November 26tli, 1868 : com- 
manding steam-sloop Lackawanna, Pacific Fleet, 1869. 



COMMODORE GUSTAVUS H. SCOTT. 

Born in Virginia, June 13th, 1812. Appointed from Virginia, August 1st, 
1828; frigate Guerriere, Pacific Squadron, 1829-31; schooner Experiment, 
Chesapeake Bay, 1833 j promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1834 j 



42 COMMODORES. 

sloop Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1835-6; waiting orders, 1837; West 
India Squadron, 1839^0; commissioned as Lieutenant^ Feb. 25th, 1841; fri- 
gate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843-44; special duty,,1845; frigate 
United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1846-47; ordnance duty, 18f8--49 ; 
waiting orders, 1850 ; ordnance duty, 1851 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific 
Squadron, 1852-53 ; steamer Michigan on the Lakes, 1855-7 ; commissioned 
as Commander, December 27th, 1856 ; Light-house Inspector, 1858-60 ; com- 
manding steamer Keystone State, special service, 1861 ; commanding steam gun 
boat Maratanza, N. A. B. Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Captain, Nov 
4th, 1863 ; commanding steamer De Soto, Blockading Squadron, 1864; com, 
manding steam-sloop Canandaigua, Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; member of Examining Board, 
Philadelphia, 1868 ; Light-house Inspector, 1869 ; commissioned as Commodore 
1869. 



COMMODORE DAVID D. McDOUGAL. 

BoKN in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, April 1st, 1828; sloop Natchez, 
West India Squadron, 1829-31 ; frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1832-35 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1884 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1835-36 ; sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1837-39 ; 
brig Consort, Coast Survey, 1840-43 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
25th, 1841; Navy Yard, New York, 1843-44; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1845-46; sloop St. Marys, 1846; attached to U. S. steamer Mississippi 
at the capture of Vera Cruz; brig Bainbridge, 1848-50, Coast of Africa; 
steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1852-54; commanding store-ship Warren, 
1855-7 ; commissioned as Commander, January 24th, 1857 ; Navy Yard, 
Mare Island, California, 1859-60 ; commanding steam-sloop Wyoming, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1861-4; while in command of the Wyoming, engaged six batteries 
and three vessels of war, at Simonsaki, Japan, July, 16th, 1863, sinking a brig 
and exploding the boilers of a steamer, with a loss of eleven killed and wounded 
on the Wyoming; commissioned as Captain, March 2,1864; commanding 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1865-66 ; commanding steam-sloop Pow- 
hattan, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-69 ; commissioned as Commodore, 1869. 



COMMODORES ON RETIRED LIST. 



COMMODORE JOHN H. AULICK. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, November 15th, 1809 ; at- 
tached to United States ship Enterprise, in the engagement with H. M. S. 
Boxer, 1813; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 9Dh, 1814; frigate Bran- 
dywine, Pacific Squadron, 1827-8; commissioned as Master Commandant, 



COMMODORES. 43 



Marchi 3d, 1831; Navy Yard, Washington, 1834; commanding sloop Vin- 
cennes, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1840 ; commissioned as Captain, Sep- 
tember Sth, 1«41; Navy Yard, Washington, 1846; Ordnance duty, 1851; 
commanding East India Squadron, 18^2 ; East India Squadron, 1853 ; com- 
missioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODOKE WILLIAM K. LATIMER. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, November 15th, 1809 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 4th, 1815; commanding schooner Grampus, 
West India Squadron, 1827-30 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1833 ; commis- 
sioned as Master Commandant, March 2d, 1833 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
1837 ; commanding steamer Poinsett, 1840 ; commissioned as Captain, July 
17th, 1843; Commandant Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1846-8; commanding frigate 
Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-1 ; special duty, 1853 ; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE CHARLES BOARMAN. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, June 9, 1811 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, March 5, 1817; Mediterranean Squadron, 1829; 
frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 1830 ; commissioned as Commander, Febru- 
ary 9th, 1837; commanding sloop Fairfield, Brazil Squadron, 1840; commissioned 
as Captain, March 29th, 1844; commanding frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1850 ; Commandant New York Navy Yard, 1853-5 ; special duty, 1861-5 ; 
commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM JAMESSON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from District of Columbia, September 1st, 
1811 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 5th, 1817 ; rendezvous, Norfolk, 
1829-30 ; sloop Boston, 1833-4 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1S37 ; commissioned 
as Commander, February 9th, 1837; commissioned as Captain, June 4th, 1844; 
commanding frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; commanding razee 
Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1851-2 ; commissioned as Commodore, 
July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE JOHN H. GRAHAM. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from New York, June 18th, 1812 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 5th, 1817 ; commissioned as Commander, Febru- 
ary 28th, 1828 ; commissioned as Captain, March 7th, 1849; commissioned as 
Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



44 COMMODOEES. 

COMMODORE WILLIAM INMAN. 

BOEN in New York. Appointed from New York, January 1st, 1812 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, April 1st, 1818; commissioned as Commander, May 
24th, 1838; frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1838; commanding steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1845 ; commissioned as Captain, June 2d, 1850 ; com- 
manding steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1851 ; commanding 
sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 1852 ; commanding Squadron, Coast of 
Africa, 1860-1 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODOEE STEPHEN CHAMPLIN. 

BoKN in Rhode Island. Appointed from Connecticut; entered the service 
as Sailing Master, May 22d, 1812, and served with credit, in the squadron on 
Lake Erie, under command of Commodore Oliver H. Perry; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, December 9th, 1814 ; commissioned as Commander, June 22d, 1838, 
and as Captain, August 4th, 1850; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 
1862. 



COMMODORE JOHN J. YOUNG. 

BoKN in New York. Appointed from New York, January 1st, 1812 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 28th, 1820 ; sloop Hornet, West India Squad- 
ron, 1829 ; Superintendent, Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1833—40 ; commissioned 
as Commander, April 15th, 1840, and as Captain, August 12th, 1854 ; com- 
missioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE FRANK ELLERY. 

BoEN in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, January 1st, 1812 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, March 28th, 1820 ; sloop Cyane, Brazil Squadron, 
1827; rendezvous, Boston, 1829-34; rendezvous. New York, 1837; com- 
manding steamer Enterprise, 1840; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 

1862. 



COMMODORE JOSEPH R. JARVIS. 

Born in Blassachusetts. Appointed from Maine, June 18th, 1812; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 28th, 1820 ; frigate Constellation, West India 
Squadron, 1827; Jlediterranean Squadron, 1829 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1834-7 ; commissioned as Commander, September 8th, 1841 ; com- 
manding brig Lawrence, 1845 ; commanding sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 



COMMODORES. 45 



1846 Navy Yard Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1851 ; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, iviay Z4th, 1855 ; commanding sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1858-60 • 
commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE^ WILLIAM 0. NICHOLSON. 

_ Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, June 18th, 1812 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1821 ; frigate United States, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1827 J rendezvous, Baltimore, 1834; commanding schooner Boxer, Pacific 
bquadron, lb40; commissioned as Commander, September 8th 1841- com- 
manding sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843; rendezvous, Boston 
1845-6; recemng-ship, New York, 1847-8; Commandant of Navy Yard 
Memphis, Tennessee, 1852-3; commanding rendezvous. New York, 1854- 
commissioned as Captain, August 22d, 1855 ; Fleet Captain, Pacific Squadron, 
lb56; commanding steam frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1858-60- 
commanding steam frigate Eoanoke, 1861 ; special service, 1862-6 ; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE EDWARD W. CARPENDER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from same State, July 10th, 1815 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825'; Mediterranean Squadron, 1827; 
sloop Falmouth, West India Squadron, 1829-30; rendezvous, Boston, 1833-4; 
frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1840; commissioned as Commander, 
September 8th, 1841 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1845 ; Inspector, &c., New York 
Navy Yard, 1852; commissioned as Commodore, Julyl6tb, 1862; Prize Com- 
missioner, Key West, Florida, 1864-5. 



COMMODORE JOSEPH B. HULL. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 9th, 1813 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; frigate Constellation, West 
India Squadron, 1827; frigate Guerriere, Pacific Squadron, 1830; frigate Poto- 
mac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1840 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, September 8th, 1841 ; commanding sloop Warren, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-7; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1850-1 ; commissioned 
as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1857-9; commanding sloop Savannah, 1861; special duty, 1862-4; 
commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Commandant Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1865 ; special service, 1866-7. 



46 COMMODORES. 

COMMODORE JOHN S. CHAUNCET. 

BOEN in New York. Appointed from same State, January 1st, 1812 ; com- 
missioned Lieutenant, January IStt, 1825; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1829 ; frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834 ; frigate 
Delaware, 1837 ; Assistant Inspector of Ordnance, 1840-43 ; commissioned as 
Commander, September Bth, 1841 ; commanding sloop Vandalia, Home Squad- 
ron, 1845 ; Ordnance duty, 1847-50 ; commissioned as Captain, September 
14th, 1855; commanding steam-sloop Susquehanna, 1861; commissioned as 
Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; special duty, 1863-66. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM H. GARDNER. 

BoEN in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 6th, 1814; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1827 ; 
sloop Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1829-30 ; rendezvous, Norfolk, 1834 ; com- 
missioned as Commander, September 8th, 1841 ; commanding receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, 1843-45 ; commanding sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1850-52 ; 
commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding steam-frigate 
Colorado, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; Commandant Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California, 1861 ; special service, 1862 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 
16th, 1862 ; Light-house Inspector, 1863-69. 



COMMODORE T. ALOYSIUS DORNIN. 

Born in Ireland. Appointed from Maryland, May 2d, 1815 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 
1827-9 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1834 ; store-ship Relief, 1837 ; commissioned as Commander, Sep- 
tember 8th, 1841 ; commanding sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1843 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1845-6 ; ordnance duty, 1847-8 ; commanding sloop Ports- 
mouth, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5 ; commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 
1855 ; ordnance duty, 1856 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1857-9 ; commanding steam- 
sloop San Jacinto, 1861 ; commanding Naval Station, Baltimore, 1862-5 ; com- 
missioned as Commodore, July 16, 1862 ; Light-house Inspector, 1868-9. 



COMMODORE JAMES GLYNN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Virginia, March 4th, 1815 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; Exploring Expedition, 1829 ; 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1830 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1834 ; commanding 
bark Consort, Exploring Expedition, 1837 ; Coast Survey, 1840 ; commissioned 
as Commander, September 8th, 1841; Pacific Squadron, 1848; commanding" 
sloop Preble, Pacific Squadron, 1850 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1852 ; Light-house 



COMMODORES. 47 

Inspector, 1853 ; commissioned as Captain, September 14t'h, 1855 ; command- 
ing steam-sloop Pensaoola, 1860 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 
1862 ; commanding sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1861 ; special 
duty, 1864-5. 



COMMODOKE ROBERT RITCHIE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, February 1st, 1816 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, Jan. ISth, 1825 ; schooner Grampus, West India 
Squadron, 1827; Mediterranean Squadron, 1830; recruiting for Exploring 
Expedition, 1837; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1840; commissioned as Com- 
mander, Sept. 13th, 1841 ; frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1846-7 ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1850 ; commanding frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 
1853 ; commissioned as Captain, Sept. 14th, 1855 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 
1862 ; special service, 1867. 



COMMODORE CHARLES LOWNDES. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 28th, 1815 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; sloop Falmouth, West India 
Squadron, 1829-30 ; sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 1834 ; commissioned as 
Commander, Sept. 8th, 1841 ; commanding sloop Germantown, Home Squad- 
ron, 1850; commanding rendezvous, Baltimore, 1852; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, Sept. 14th, 1855 ; commanding steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squad- 
ron, 1860-61 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Prize Commis- 
sioner at Baltimore, 1864-5. 



COMMODORE JOHN MARSTON. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, April 15th, 1815; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, January 15th, 1825 ; frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1827-29; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1833-34; frigate 
United States, 1840 ; commissioned as Commander, September 8th, 1841 ; 
commanding sloop Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1850 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1853-55 ; commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding sloop 
Cumberland, Brazil Squadron, 1861 ; special service, 1862 ; commissioned as 
Commodore, July 16th, 186-2 ; Light-house Inspector, 1863-66 ; special ser- 
vice. Key West, 1867. 



COMMODORE HENRY BRUCE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 9th, 
1813 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, January 13th, 1825 ; receiving-ship. Boston, 



48 COMMODORES. 

1827 ; frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Bos- 
ton, 1840; commissioned as Commander, September 8th, 1841 j commanding 
brig Truxton, Coast of Africa, 1845 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1848-50 ; 
commissioned as Commodore, July I6th, 1862. 



COMMODORE JOHN POPE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Maine, May 30th, 1816; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, April 28th, 1826 ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1827-8 ; sloop St. Louis, West India Squadron, 1883-4 ; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1837 ; razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1840 ; Navy Yard, Bos- 
ton, 1843 ; commissioned as Commander, February 15th, 1843 ; commanding 
brig Dolphin, Coast of Africa, 1846-7 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1850 ; commanding 
sloop Vandalia, East India Squadron, 1853-6 ; commissioned as Captain, Sep- 
tember 14th, 1855; Commandant Navy Yard Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
1858-60; commanding steam sloop Richmond, Gulf Squadron, 1861; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Prize Commissioner, Boston, 1864-5; 
Light-house Inspector, 1866-9. 



COMMODORE THOMAS 0. SELFRIDGE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, January 1st, 1818 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, J\Iarch 3d, 1827 ; Exploring Expedition, 1829 ; 
sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1830 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1834; frigate North Carolina, 1837 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1840 ; 
commissioned as Commander, April 11th, 1844 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1845 ; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1846 ; commanding 
sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1848 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1851-2 ; 
Boston Navy Yard, 1853-55 ; commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; 
commanding steamer Mississippi, 1861 ; Commandant Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California, 1862-64 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; Com- 
mandant Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1867-68 ; President Examining Board, 
1869. 



COMMODORE HENRY EAGLE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, January 1st, 1818 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827 ; sloop Natchez, West India Squad- 
ron, 1830 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1833-4; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 
1837 ; rendezvous, New York, 1840 ; schooner Shark, Pacific Squadron, 1848 ; 
commissioned as Commander, June 4th, 1844; Inspector, etc. New York, 1846; 
commanding bomb vessel ^tna. Home Squadron, 1847 ; special service, 1851 ; 
commanding steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854-5 ; commissioned as 
Captain, Sept. 14th, 1855; commanding frigate Santee, Gulf Sauadron, 1861-2. 



COMMODORES. 49 

Captain Eagle organized and sent out several successful expeditions against 
the enemy, whilst stationed in the Gulf. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; prize commissioner New 
Fork, 1864-5 ; Light-house Inspector, 1866. ' 



COMMODORE WILLIAM M. GLENDY. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, Jan. 1st, 1818 j commissioned 
as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827; sloop Boston, Brazil Squadron, 1^27-9; 
schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 1831-3; frigate North CaroHna, Pacific 
Squadron, 1837 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1847-50 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, Feb. 25th, 1847; commanding sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 
1851-2 ; commissioned as Captain, Sept. 14th, 1855 ; commanding sloop Sara- 
toga, 1861-2; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Prize Commis- 
sioner, Washington, D. C, 1863-4; special duty, Philadelphia, 1865. 



COMMODORE GEORGE S. BLAKE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, April 23, 1818 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, March 31, 1827; West India Squadron, 1829 ;sur- 
vfty of Narragansett Bay, 1831-3 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1834; Coast Sur- 
vey, 1837-48; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1847-8; commissioned as Com- 
mander, February 27th, 1847 ; Fleet Captain, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-2 ; 
Bureau Construction, 1853-5 ; commissioned as Captain, September 14th, 1855 ; 
special duty, 1856-7 ; Superintendent Naval Academy, 1858-65 ; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Light-house Inspector, 1866-9. 



COMMODORE OSCAR BULLUS. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from New York, November 1st, 
1817; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827; receiving-ship. New 
York, 1833-4; Mediterranean Squadron, 1837; brig Boxer, Home Squadron, 
1843; receiving-ship, New York, 1845-6; commanding store-ship Relief, 
Home Squadron, 1847 ; commissioned Commander, May 16th, 1848 ; com- 
manding steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1850-1 ; commissioned as Captain, 
July 11th, 1861; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
rendezvous. New York, 1863-6. 



COMMODORE CHARLES H. JACKSON. 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from Georgia, March 4th, 1818 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827; Coast Survey, 1827; receiving-ship, 
4 



50 COMMODORES. 

Philadelphia, 1830-2 ; Echooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1833-4; brig 
Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1837; rendezvous, Boston, 1845; special duty, Bos- 
ton, 1847; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1848; commissioned 
as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODOKE HUGH Y. PURVIANCE. 

Born in Blaryland. Appointed from Maryland, November 3d, 1818; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1827 ; frigate North Carolina, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1827 ; sloop Falmouth, West India Squadron, 1829-30 ; sloop 
Peacock, Brazilian Squadron, 1833-4 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1837-48 ; com- 
missioned as Commander, March 7th, 1849; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1850-1 ; 
commanding sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1853-5 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 
1856; commissioned as Captain, January 28th, 1856; commanding frigate St. 
Lawrence, 1861; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Light-house 
Inspector, 1863-5. 



COMMODORE FRANCIS B. ELLISON. 

Born in Nev? York. Appointed from New York, May 28th, 1819 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, May 17th, 1828 ; schooner Porpoise, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1827-9 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1833-4 ; Navy Yard, New York, 
1837 ; frigate Brandywine, 1840 ; store-ship Lexington, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1845 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1847-8 ; commissioned Commander, May 
29th, 1850; Inspector, &c., New York, 1853-4 ; commanding sloop Jamestown, 
Coast of Africa, 1855 ; commissioned Captain, INIarch 2d, 1857 ; commissioned 
as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; Light-house Inspector, 1866-8. 



COMSIODORE T. DARRAH SHAW. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 28th, 1820 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, May 17th, 1828; frigate Macedonian, Brazil 
Squadron, 1827; sloop Lexington, Brazil Squadron, 1833-4; frigate Constel- 
lation, Pacific Squadron, 1840; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1843; rendezvous, 
Philadelphia, 1846 ; Bureau of Construction, 1851 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, August 7th, 1850 ; commanding rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1852-4 ; 
commanding sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1855 ; commanding steamer 
Montgomery, W. G-. B. Squadron, 1860-1 ; commissioned Commodore, July 
16th, 1862; special duty, Philadelphia, 1864-5. 



COMMODORE SAMUEL LOCKWOOD. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from New York, June 12th, 1820 ; com- 
missioned OS Lieutenant, May 17th, 1828 ; sloop Warren, Mediterranean Squad- 



COMMODORES. 51 

ron, 1828 ; schooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1832-4; receiving-ship. 
New York, 1837 ; sloop Oyane, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840 ; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1845-6; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 
1847-8 ; commissioned as Commander, October 8th, 1850 ; rendezvous, Bos- 
ton, 1853-5; commanding sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60; command- 
ing steamer Daylight, North Atlantic Squadron, 1861. 

Commander Lockwood was present at the battle of Hatteras Inlet, in 1861. 

Commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; special duty, Philadelphia, 



COMMODORE JOHN COLHOUN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 25th, 1821 ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 27th, 1828; frigate United States, Pacific 
Squadron, 1828 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, May 27th, 1830 ; frigate Hud- 
son, Brazil Squadron, 1830-31 ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1837; receiving-ship, New York, 1840; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 
1843 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1845-6 ; commissioned aa Commander, Novem- 
ber 4th, 1852 ; commanding sloop Portsmouth, Coast of Africa, 1860-1 ; com- 
missioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding receiving-ship, Phila- 
delphia, 1864-5 ; Light-house Inspector, 1866-8. 



COMMODORE AUGUSTUS H. KILTY. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, July 4th, 1821 ; frigate Con- 
stellation, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 1829 ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28, 1832 ; schooner Grampus, West 
India Squadron, 1832-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 6th, 1837 ; 
sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 1840 ; frigate Columbus, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1843; frigate United States, 1847; Mediterranean Squadron, 
1848 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1850; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1851 ; receiving- 
ship, New York, 1855 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; 
commanding rendezvous, Baltimore, 1860. 

In 1861 and '62, Commander Kilty commanded one of the vessels of the 
Mississippi Flotilla, and was with Foote in nearly all of his actions with the 
enemy, in one of which he lost an arm. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty, 1863-4 ; com- 
manding iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5; commissioned 
as Commodore, July 25th, 1866 ; Commandant Norfolk Navy Yard, 1866-9. 



COMMODORE WILLIAM SMITH. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, March 4th, 1823 ; sloop 
John Adams, West India Squadron, 1827; promoted to Passed Midshipman 
March 23, 1829 ; Coast Surrey, 1830-2 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8 



52 COMMODORES. 

1831; sloop Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1837; frigate Constitution, 
Pacific Squadron, 1840; special service, 1843; steamer Mississippi, Home 
Squadron, 1846; brig Boxer, coast of Africa, 1848; rendezvous. New 
York, 1850; steamer Vizen, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, September 12th, 1854 ; commanding sloop Levant, East India Squad- 
ron, 1856-8 ; commanding receiving-ship, Boston, 1860-1 ; commissioned as 
Captain, 1861 ; commanding steamer Wachusett, James River flotilla, 1862 ; 
commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Pen- 
sacola, 1863-5. 



COMMODORE JONATHAN W. SWIFT. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from North Carolina, August 25th, 1823; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 23d, 1829 ; frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1827-29; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1831; steamship 
Fulton, Atlantic coast, 1840; special service, 1850-55 ; commissioned as Com- 
modore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE JAMES M. WATSON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, February 1st, 1823 ; sloop 
Peacock, Pacific Squadron, 1827 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, March 23d, 
1829; Mediterranean Squadron, 1830; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 
30th, 1831 ; Brazil Squadron, 1834-6 ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1837 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1840 ; frigate Columbus, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1843 ; Pacific Squadron, 1846 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific 
Squadron, 1847-8; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1851-2; steamer Fulton, Home 
Squadron, 1854-5 ; commissioned as Commander, February 1st, 1861 ; Light- 
house Inspector, 1863-6 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE JOHN W. LIVINGSTON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, March 4th, 1823 ; sloop 
Warren, Mediterranean Squadron, 1827 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, June 21st, 
1832 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; frigate Congress, East 
India Squadron, 1848; Navy Yard, New York, 1850-1 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, May 24th, 1855; commanding sloop St. Louis, coast of Africa, 1856- 
7-8 ; commanding steamer Penguin, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding Naval Station, 
Norfolk, 1862-4 ; commanding Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1865-6 ; 
special service, 1867. 



COMMODORES. 53 

COMMODORE JUNIUS J. BOYLE. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, August 27th 
1823 ; sloop Peacock, Pacific Squadron, 1827 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman^ 
March 23d, 1829 ; Mediterranean Squadron, 1830 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
June 21st, 1832; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1884-6 ; frigate 
Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843; Naval Storekeeper, Port Mahon, 
1845-6 ; schooner Bonito, Home Squadron, .1848 ; store-ship Southampton,' 
1851-3-4-5 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862. 



COMMODORE PETER TURNER. 

Born in Rhode Island Appointed from Rhode Island, March 4th, 1823 ; 
sloop Cyane, Brazil Squadron, 1827 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, March 
23d, 1829; commissioned as Lieutenant, June 21st, 1832; receiving-ship Bos- 
ton, 1833-4; schooner Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1837; frigate Constitution, 
Pacific Squadron, 1840 ; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; special 
duty, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 1847-50 ; commanding store-ship Southampton, 
1852 ; commissioned as Commander, July 1st, 1861 ; commissioned as Com- 
modore, July lG:h, 1S62; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1863-5. 



COMMODORE BENJAMIN J. TOTTEN. 

Born in West Indies. Appointed from New York, March 4th, 1823; 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1827 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, February 
25th, 1830; schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, 1830-4; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 29th, 1834; schooner Shark, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1837; sloop Decatur, 1845; rendezvous, Boston, 1847; store-ship Relief, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-1 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1852-3-4 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; commanding sloop Vincennes, 
Coast of Africa, 1858-9-60; commanding store-ship Brandywine, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 
1862 ; commanding naval rendezvous, New Bedford, 1864-5 ; Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1866-8. 



COMMODORE ROBERT B. HITCHCOCK. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, January 1st, 1825 ; 
schooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1827 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1829-30-1 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; spe- 
cial duty, 1833-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 3d, 1835 ; special 
duty, 1837; frigate Ohio, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840; rendezvous, "ostou, 
1843 ; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1845-6 ; Ordnance duty, 1850-1-2 ; 
commanding store-ship Relief, 1853 ; Inspector, &c., Boston, 1854-5 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; Ordnance duty, 1856-7; com 



54 COMMODORES. 

manding steam frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9-60 ; Inspector of 
Ordnance, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, 1861 ; commissioned as Commo- 
dore, Jijly 16th, 1862; commanding steam-sloop Susquehanna, Western Gulf 
Squadron, 1862-3. 

During the greater portion of the time Commodore Hitchcock was attached to 
the Western Gulf Squadron he was the senior officer of the blockading fleet 
off Mobile. 

Ordnance duty, 1864-5 ; Commandant Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866. 



COMMODOKE JAMES F. SCHENCK. 

Born in Ohio, June 11th, 1807. Appointed from Ohio, March 1st, 1825 ; 
sloop Hornet, West India Squadron, 1829 ; frigate Brandy wine, 1830 ; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; sloop John Adams, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1833-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 22d, 1835; sloop 
St. Louis, West India Squadron, 1837; brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1840; 
razee Independence, Home Squadron, 1843 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 
1846-7. 

During the war with Mexico, Lieutenant Schenck, as Chief Military Aid to 
Commodore Stockton, landed and took possession of Santa Barbara, and San 
Pedro, in California ; serving in same capacity, marched on and was at the first 
capture of Los Angelos. As Second Lieutenant of the frigate Congress, was at 
the bombardment and capture of Guaymas, and the taking of Mazatlan. 

Frigate Congress, East India Squadron, 1848 ; commanding mail steam-ship 
Ohio, 1848—52 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; com- 
manding receiving-ship New York, 1848; commanding steamer Saginaw, East 
India Squadron, 1860-1. 

On June 30th, 1861, the Saginaw was fired upon by a fort at " Quin Hone," 
Cochin China ; the fire was returned and the fort silenced. 

Commissioned as Captain, 1861; commanding frigate St. Lawrence, Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862 ; commissioned as Commodore, July 2d, 1863 ; command- 
ing steam-sloop Powhatan, North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanded 
Powhatan, and 3d division of Porter's Squadron, on the two attacks upon Fort 
Fisher; commanding Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1866. 



COMMODORE TIMOTHY A. HUNT. 

BoRtJ in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, February 1st, 1825 ; 
sloop Vincennea, Pacific Squadron, ]827; sloop Warren, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1829 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 4th, 1831 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-4, 
commissioned as Lieutenant, December 17th, 1836; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1840; receiving-ship, New York, 1843; frigate Brandywine, East India 
Squadron, 1845 ; commanding ordnance-transport Eleotra, 1847-8 ; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1850; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1853-5 ; commissioned as 
Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; ordnance dutv, 1856-7-8-9 ; command- 
ing steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1880-61 ; commissioned as 



COMMODORES. 55 

Captain, July 16th, 1862; commissioned as Commodore, January 2d, 1863; 
ordnance duty, Boston, 1862-7 ; special duty. New London, Connecticut, 1869. 



COMMODORE JOHN M. BERRIEN. 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from same State, March 1st, 1825 ; frigate 
Constellation, West India Squadron, 1827; frigate Guerriere, Pacific Squadron, 
1829 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1830 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 4th, 1831 ; schooner Shark, West India Squadron, 1833-4 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 9th, 1837 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1837 ; re- 
cruiting service, Norfok, 1840 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1843 ; frigate 
Potomac, Home Squadron, 1845; steamer Scorpion, Home Squadron, 1847-8; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1850; frigate Savannah, Brazil Squadron, 1854-6; 
commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1858-60 ; commanding sloop John Adams, 1861 ; commis- 
sioned as Captain, July 16th, 1852 ; ordnance duty, Pittsburg, 1862-4 ; com- 
manding Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1865 ; Light-house Inspector, 1866-9 ; commis- 
sioned as Commodore, September 26, 1866. 



COMMODORE JOHN C. CARTER. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Kentucky, March 1st, 1825 ; sloop Lex- 
ington, 1827 ; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1829-30 ; promoted 
toPassed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
9th, 18.37; frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1840; receiving-ship. 
New York, 1845 ; steamer Mississippi, Home Squadron, 1846 ; Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, 1847^8 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1852 ; steamer Massa- 
chusetts, Pacific Squadron, 1853; rendezvous. New York, 1855 ;_ commissioned 
aa Commander, Sentember 14th, 1855 ; commanding steamer Michigan, on the 
Lakes, 1861-64; commissioned as Commodore, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1865; Light-house Inspector, 1866-69. 



COMMODORE JOHN P. GILLIS. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Illinois, December 12th, 1825 ; Pawfic 
Squadron, 1827-29 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, January 4th, 1831 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9th, 1837; sloop Lexington, I^cifac 
Squadron, 1840; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843; Navy Yard, 
Plnsacola, 1845; Pacific Squadron, 1846; Coast Survey, 1847 ; sloop i-lymouth, 
East India Squadron, 1853-54 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 
1855 ; commanding rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1859-60 ; commanding steamer 
Monticello, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Ossipee, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-64; Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia, 1865 ; commissioned as Commodore, September 28th, 1866. 



56 COMMODORES. 

COMMODORE JOHN J. GLASSON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 21st, 1823 ; fri- 
gate North Carolina, Mediterranean Squadron, 1827 ; sloop Warren, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1829; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1831; 
receiving-ship, New York, 1833-34 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
9th, 1837 ; rendezvous. New York, 1837; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 
1840 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1845 ; steamer Spitfire, Home Squadron, 1847 ; 
schooner Falcon, Home Squadron, 1848; Navy Yard, New York, 1850 ; com- 
manding store-ship Lexington, 1854-55; commissioned as Commaader, Septem- 
ber 14th, 1855 ; commanding rendezvous, New York, 1858-59 ; commanding 
rendezvous, New Bedford, 1861-64; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1865; commissioned 
as Commodore, September 28th, 1866. 



COMMODORE EDWARD R. THOMPSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New Jersey, December 1st, 1826 
sloop Ontario, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830-32 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, April 28th, 1832 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8th, 1837 
sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 1840 ; special service, 1843 ; steamer 
Princeton, special service, 1845 ; brig Porpoise, Home Squadron, 1846 ; Navy 
Ya^d, Philadelphia, 1848 ; sloop Germantown, Coast of Africa, 1851-52 ; ren- 
dezvous, Philadelphia, 1854-55 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 
1855 ; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1858-60 ; commanding steam-sloop Semi- 
nole, 1861 ; rendezvous. New York, 1862-4 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1865 ; 
commissioned as Commodore, September 28, 1866; special duty. New York, 
1866-7. 



COMMODORE ROBERT HANDY. 

Born in Pthode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, February 1st, 1826 ; 
sloop Adams, West India Squadron, 1827; Frigate Hudson, Brazil Squadron, 
1829-30 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 1832 ; sloop Vincennes, 
Pacific Squadron, 1832-5; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8th, 1837; 
frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1837; Navy Yard, Boston, 1840; sloop 
Levant, Pacific Squadron, 1845-6; receiving-ship, Boston, 1847-8; Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1850; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; 
Light-house Inspector, 1858-9 ; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1860 ; com- 
manding sloop D le, Pacific Squadron, 1862-5 ; Commissioned as Commodore, 
September 28th, 1866. 



COMMODORE CHARLES GREEN. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, May 1st, 1826 ; receiv- 
ing-ship, Boston, 1827 ; sloop Peacock, West India Squadron, 1830-2 ; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 1832; Navy Yard, New York, 1833-4; 



COMMODORES. 57 

frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1837 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 
Sth, 1887 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1840 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 
1843 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1850 ; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 
1852 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1854-5 ; commissioned as Commander, September 
14th, 1855 ; Light-house Inspector, 1859-GO ; commanding sloop Jamestown, 
1861 ; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; commaading receiving-ship| 
Boston, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Commodore, September 28th, 1866 ; Light^ 
house Inspector, 1866-8. 



COMMODORE CICERO PRICE. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from same State, February 1st, 1826 ; frigate 
Macedonian, Brazil Squadron, 1827 ; sloop Falmouth, West India Squadron, 
1829; sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1830 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, April 28th, 1832; schooner Shark, West India c-'quadron, 1834-6; brig 
Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1837 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 6th, 
1837 ; steamer Fulton, Atlantic coast, 1840 ; frigate Delaware, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1843; receiving-ship. New York, 1845; sloop Marion, coast of Africa, 
1846; sloop Marion, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; Navy Yard, Memphis, 
1850 ; Pacific Squadron, 1851 ; Ordnance duty, 1853 ; receiving-ship Norfolk, 
1854; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; commanding sloop 
Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850 ; commanding steamer Huntsville, 
Blockading Squadron, 1861; commissioned as Captain, July 16, 1862; command- 
ing sloop Jamestown, East India Squadron, 1862-5 ; commissioned as Commo- 
dore, September 28th, 1866. 



COMMODORE JAMES P. McKINSTRY. 

Born in New York, February 9th, 1803. Appointed from Michigan, Febru- 
ary 1st, 1826 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1827 ; sloop Warren, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1829-30; promoted to Passed Midshipman, April 28th, 1832 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1833-4; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 9th, 1837; sloop 
Concord, West India Squadron, 1837; schooner Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1840; 
sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1843; steamer Michigan, on the Lakes, 
1845-6; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1847; rendezvous, Boston, 1850; 
commanding mail steamer Georgia, 1854-5; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; Light-house Inspector, 1858-9; commanding steam- 
sloop Dakotah, Blockading Squadron, 1861; commissioned as Captain, July 
16th, 1862; commanding steam-sloop Blonongahela, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron ; present at Port Hudson and Vicksburg, 1863. 

While in command of the Monongahela, operating on the Blississippi, Captain 
McKinstry was wounded, and during the remainder of the war was compelled 
to remain inactive. 

Commanding receiving-ship, New York, 1865-6; commissioned as Commo- 
dore, July 26th, 1866 ; at present. Commandant Naval Station, Sackett's Har- 
bor, New York. 



58 CAPTAINS. 

COMMODORE JOHN DE CAMP. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Florida, October 1st, 1827 ; sloop 
Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1829-30 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
10th, 1833; frigate Constellation, West India Squadron, 1837; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, February 28th, 1838; sloop Peacock, Brazil Squadron, 1840; 
sloop Boston, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 
1850; frigate Constitution, Coast of Africa, 1854; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1855 ; Light-house Inspector, 
1858-60 ; commanding store-ship Relief, 1861 ; commanding steam-sloop Iro- 
quois, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Commanded the Iroquois at the attack upon and passage of Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip, capture of New Orleans, and at the various battles on the Mis- 
sissippi, to and including Vioksburg. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862; commanding frigate Wabash, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; commissioned as Commodore, September 
28th, 1866; commanding store-ship Potomac, Pensacola, Florida, 1868-7; 
commanding receiving-ship Potomac, Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN J. ALMY. 



Born in Rhode Island, April 25th, 1818. Appointed from Rhode Island, 
February 2d, 1829; attached to sloop Vinoennes, Pacific Squadron, 1834 ; 
sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 1835-6 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 
3, 1835 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1837 ; sloop Cyane, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1840; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 8th, 1841; brig Bainbridge, 
Home Squadron, 1843 ; frigate Macedonian, Coast of Africa, 1845 ; Naval Ob- 
servatory, Washington, 1846 ; frigate Ohio, Home Squadron, 1846 ; present at 
Vera Cruz and Tuspan ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847-50 ; Coast 
Survey, 1851-7 ; commanding steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1858-9 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1860; commissioned as Commander, April 24th, 1861; com- 
manding steamer South Carolina, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; commanding 
steamer Connecticut, 1863-4. 

The Connecticut was the steamer detailed to carry the mails to the vessels on 
the blockade, and, while commanding her. Captain Almy captured several 
valuable prizes. 

Special duty, New York, 1865 ; commissioned as Captain, March 3d, 1865 ; 
commanding steam sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; ordnance 
duty, New York, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN JAMES H. STRONQ. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 2d, 1829 ; at- 
tached to sloop Lexington, Brazil Squadron, 1832—3 ; schooner Enterprise, 
Brazil Squadron, 1834 ; Naval School, New York, 1835 ; frigate Constellation, 
West India Squadron, 1836 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4tb, 1836 ; 
razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1839-42 ; commissioned as Lieutenant 



CAPTAINS. 59 

September, 1841 ; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1844-6 ; receivio"'- 
sliip New York, 1851-2; sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, IBSS-S'- 
receiving-ship New York, 1856; rendezvous. New York, 1857-8; commandin<i 
store-sbip Relief, 1859 ; commissioned as Commander, April 24th, 1861 ; com° 
manding steamer Mohawk, South Atlantic Squadron, 1861; commanding 
steamer Flag, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steam-sloop Monon*^ 
gahela, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5. 

In November, 1863, Commander Strong convoyed a division of the army 
under General Banks from New Orleans to Brazos Island, at Brazos de San- 
tiago. On the 25th November, 1863, a body of troops under Major General 
Banks captured _a battery of three heavy guns at Arkansas Pass. Commander 
Strong, after assisting in the landing of the troops, steamed ahead and opened 
an effective fire on the battery, which shortly hoisted a white flag and was taken 
possession of by the troops, who had also engaged it. General Banks com- 
mended the effective gunnery of the Monongahela. Commander Strong com- 
manded the Monongahela at the battle of Blobile Bay, August 5th, 1864. His 
vessel was the first to engage the rebel ram Tennessee. He sheered out of the 
line to run into her, and struck her fair, at the same time giving her a broadside 
of solid 11-inch shot, which apparently had but little if any effect upon her. 
Soon after, signal was made to his ship to again run into her ; he did so, and was 
about to try it the third time, when she surrendered to the fleet. 

Commissioned as Captain, August 5th, 1865 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, New 
York, 1866-7; commanding steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 
1868-9 ; at present, attached to Navy Yard, New York. 



CAPTAIN JAMES M. FRATLEY. 

BoKN in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 1st, 1828; attached 
to sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1829-32; frigate Delaware, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1833-4; frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835; 
frigate Constellation, West India Squadron, 1836 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 4th, 1836 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1839-40; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, September 8th, 1841; sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-3; 
Home Squadron, 1846-7; Lieutenant Frailey served in naval battery before 
Vera Cruz; Sloop Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1849-50; receiving-ship Phila- 
delphia, 1852-3; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7; Naval 
Asylum, Philadelphia, 1858-9; commanding store-ship Release, 1860-1; com- 
missioned as Commander, 1861 ; commanding steamer Quaker City, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1362-4. 

January 31st, 1863, a raid was made by the rebel rams on the blockading 
fleet off Charleston; the Quaker City was struck by a IX-inch shell, partially 
disabling a portion of her machinery ; she returned the fire of the enemy with 
the starboard broadside and pivot-gun. 

Commanded steam sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5; present at both attacks on Fort Fisher; Inspector, Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1866 ; commissioned as Captain, February 6th, 1866 ; command- 
ing steam stoop Saranao, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8. 



60 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN ENOCH G. PAEROTT. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, December_^ 
lOtli, 1831; attached to schooner Boxer, Brazil Squadron, 1832-4; attached 
to sloop Natchez, Brazil Squadron, 1835; Navy Yard, Boston, 1837; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1837 ; brig Consort, on surveying duty, 
1840 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841. Was engaged in 
the operations under Commodore Perry against Beraly, and the neighboring 
towns, on West Coast of Africa, December, 1843, and was with all the landing 
parties. Sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1843 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1846-8. 

During the war with Mexico, while serving in the Congress, was with Free- 
mont's Expedition from Monterey to Los Angelos, at which place there was a 
slight engagement ; was at the capture of Guaymas and Mazatlan, and in two 
skirmishes at the last-named place. The Congress received the thanks of the 
President and the Department. 

Pieoeiving-ship, Boston, 1850; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1852-3 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1854-5 ; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1857-8 ; special duty, 1859 ; commissioned as Commander, April, 
1861 ; was with the expedition which destroyed Norfolk Navy Yard, April, 
1861; in the brig Perry at the time of the capture of the rebel privateer Savan- 
nah, which resisted. Received for this the commendation of the Department. 
Commanding steamer Augusta, 1861-3. In the Augusta, participated in the 
battle of Port-Royal, under Rear Admiral Du Pont, and subsequently engaged 
the rebel rams at the time of their sortie from Charleston, January 13th, 1863, 
and was on this occasion under the fire of the rebel batteries in Charleston har- 
bor. Commanding iron-clad Canonicus, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5. Inthe-- 
Canonicus participated in the engagement with Hewlett's battery and the iron, 
clads on James lliver, June 21st, 1864 ; and in the subsequent engagement 
with Hewlett's Battery; commanding iron-clad Monadnock, in the attacks under 
Rear Admiral Porter on Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; 
and subsequently, under Rear Admiral Dahlgren, was present at the surrender 
of Charleston. Commanding receiving-ship, Boston, 1865-8 ; commissioned as 
Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1-S69. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM REYNOLDS. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania, December 10th, 1815. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
November 17th, 1831 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, West India Squadron, 
1832-3 ; brig Boxer, Brazil Squadron, 1834; frigate Potomac, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1835-6 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1837 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 15th, 1837 ; Exploring Expedition, 1838-42 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1844-5 ; steamer Alleghany, Brazil Squadron, 1846-8 ; unemployed from 
1848-57 ; Naval Storekeeper, Honolulu, 1857-61 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, _ June 9tb, 1862; commanding store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; commanding store-ship New Hampshire, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866; commanding steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-9; 
at present, member of Ordnance Board. 



CAPTAINS. 61 

CAPTAIN FABIUS STANLY. 

Born in North Carolina, December 15th,- 1815. Appointed from North 
Carolina, December 20tb, 1831 ; frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1832-4; frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835; receiving-shipl 
New York, 1836; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1837 ; bark 
Consort, surveying service, 1839-41 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
Sth, 1841 ; frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1842-3 ; st'=^amer Princeton, 
special service, 1844-5; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8. 

Present at the capture of Guaymas, and participated in many engagements on 
the Pacific coast, during the Mexican war. 

Pacific Squadron, '1848-50 ; commanding store-ship Warren, 1852-3; com- 
manding store-ship at San Francisco, California, 1855 ; Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, California, 1856 ; commanding store-ship Supply, 1859 ; receiving-ship, 
Mare Island, California, 1860-1 ; commissioned as Commander, May 19th, 1861; 
commandingsteamerNarragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1862-3 ; ordnance duty, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1864; commanding steamer State of Georgia, South 
Atlantic Squadron, lS64r-5 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; com- 
manding Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; at present, commanding 
rendezvous, Baltimore. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. MACOMB. 

BoEN in Michigan. Appointed from New York, April 10th, 1834 ; attached 
to frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834-7; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1840 ; promoted to Passed Blidshipman, July 16th, 1840 ; Brazil Squadron, 
1841-4; rendezvous. New York, 1844-6; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
27th, 1847 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8 ; receiving-ship New 
York, 1849-50; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1850-3; receiving-ship 
New York, 1854-6 ; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1856-8; engaged 
in the attack and capture of the Barrier Forts on the Canton river, China, by 
the Portsmouth and Levant, November 16th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 1856; com- 
manding steamer Metacomet, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859; 
commanding steamer Pulaski, Brazil Squadron 1860-1 ; commanding steamer 
Genegsee, Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commissioned as Commander, July 
16th, 1862. 

While attached to Genessee attempted the passage of rebel batteries at Port 
Hudson, March 14th, 1863, and took part in almost daily engagements with 
rebel batteries along the Mississippi during April, May and June, 1863. 

Commanding steamer Shamrock, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
commanded naval force in capture and bombardment of Plymouth, North 
Carolina, October 29th and 30th, 1864 ; commanded naval forces in the action 
with the rebel batteries and infantry on the Roanoke river, near Poplar Point, 
North Carolina, during the expedition up that river. 

For his gallantry and energy as displayed in his operations against the rebels 
while serving in the North Atlantic Squadron, Commander Macomb was ad- 
vanced several numbers in his grade. 

Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-8; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866 3 commanding steam-sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 1869. 



62 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM E. LE EOY. 

Born in New York, March 24tb, 1818. Appointed from New York, January 
llth, 1832 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-6 ; 
brif Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1837-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
23d, 1838 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-40 ; store-ship Erie, 
1842-3; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 13th, 1843; steamer Mississippi, 
Home Squadron, 1846 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1847 ; engage- 
ment with Mexican soldiers at Rio Aribiqua, while assisting to water tlae 
Princeton; sloop Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51 ; waiting orders, 1862; 
frigate Savannah, Brazil Squadron, 1853-5 ; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, 
New York, 1857-8 ; frigate Sabine, Brazil Squadron, 1859 ; commanding 
steamer Mystic, Coast of Africa, 1861 ; commissioned as Commander, July 1st, 
1861 ; commanding steamer Keystone State, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3; capture of Fernandina, 1862; engagement with iron-clads, off 
Charleston, South Carolina, January, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1864; commanding steam-sloop Ossipee, Western 
Gulf Squadron, 1864-5. 

Commanded the Ossipee at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; his 
vessel was struck many times, but fortunately not disabled. When about run- 
ning down the Tennessee, that vessel displayed a white flag, and Captain Le Roy 
received her surrender from Captain Johnston, her commander, the rebel Ad- 
miral Buchanan, being wounded. 

Naval rendezvous. New York, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866 ; Fleet Captain, European Squadron, under Admiral Farragut, 1867-8. 



CAPTAIN ROGER N. STEMBEL. 

BoEN in Middletown, Slaryland. Appointed from Ohio, March 27th, 1832 ; 
attached to schooner Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; Naval School, 
New York, 1834-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23d, 1838 ; attached 
to frigate Brandywiue, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-2 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, October 23th, 1843; Coast Survey, 1844-7; sloop Levant, Home 
Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; special duty, 
Washington, _ 1855-7 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 
1857-9 ; special duty, Cincinnati, 1861 ; commissioned as Commander, July 1 
1861 ; Mississippi flotilla, 1862. 

Engagement at Luea.s Bend, September 9th, 1861 ; Belmont, November 7th, 
1861 ; Fort Henry, February 6th, 1862 ; bombardment and capture of Island 
No. 10, Mississippi river, from March 16th to April 7th, 1862; near Fort 
Pillow, with rebel rams. May 10th, 1862, besides several minor affairs, while 
attached to Mississippi flotilla, from August 1861 to May 1862 ; wounded near 
Fort Pillow May 10th, 1862, in engagement with rebel rams. 

Waiting orders, 1863 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1864; special duty, Pitts- 
burg, 1865 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam- 
sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-7. 



CAPTAINS. 63 

CAPTAIN J. R. MADISON MULLANY. 

Born in New York, October 26th, 1818. Appointed, from New Jersey, 
January 7th, 1832 ; attached to the frigate Constellation, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1833-5 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1836 ; promoted to Passed Midship. 
man, June 23d, 1838 ; frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837-9 ; 
brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1840; receiving-ship, New York, 1843; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, February 29th, 1844; Coast Survey, 1844-6; Home 
Squadron, 1847 ; engaged in the attack and capture of the City of Tobasco, 
during Mexican war ; Coast Survey, 1848 ; frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1849-51 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1852 ; frigate Columbia, Home 
Squadron, 1853-5; ordnance duty. New York, 1856-8; frigate Sabine, 
Home Squadron, 1859-60; commanded steamer Wyandotte, at Pensacola dur- 
ing April and May, 1861. 

Occupied a position inside of the harbor, in rear of Fort Pickens, to aid in 
protecting it from a threatened attack from the rebels, and assisted in towing in 
the boats and landing force, composed of sailors and marines, to reinforce ^ort 
Pickens. 

Commanded steamer Bienville in the N. A. and W. G. Squadrons, from April, 
1862 to August 1864, occasionally engaged with, and coming under the fire of 
the forts on the coast ; commanded steam-sloop Oneida, during attack on Forts 
Morgan and Graines, rebel iron-clad Tennessee and gun-boats. Mobile Bay, 
August 5th 1864 ; lost left arm and received flesh-wound in left leg by a shell 
from rebel ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; ordnance duty, New York, 
1866-8 ; commanding steam-sloop Richmond, European Squadron, 1869. 



CAPTAIN C. R. P. RODGERS. 

Born November 14th, 1819, in New York. Appointed from Connecticut, 
October 5th, 1833 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1834-5 ; 
sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1836 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1837 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, July 8th, 1837 ; schooner Flirt, Coast of Florida, 
1839-40 ; sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1842-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 4th, 1844 ; frigate Cumberland, Brazil Squadron, 1844-5 ; Coast 
Survey, 1846 ; Home Squadron, 1847 ; present at reduction of Vera Cruz and 
capture of Tobasco; Coast Survey, 1850 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1850-1; frigate Constitution, Coast of Africa, 1852-5; (Flag Lieutenant of 
squadron;) Coast Survey, 1856-8; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1858-9 ; Commandant of Midshipmen, Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; 
commissioned as Commander, October 18th, 1861 ; commanding steam-frigate 
Wabash, flag-ship. South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2 ; commanded Wabash at 
battle of Port-Royal, November, 1861 ; at Fort Pulaski, in command of naval 
battery, January 27th, 1862. 

In March, 1862, Captain Rodgers commanded a division of an expedition of 
gun-boats to St. Augustine, Fernandina, and up the St. Marys river. 

Fleet-captain South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam- 
sloop Iroquois, special service, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866-8 ; commanding frigate Franklin, flag-ship Eu- 
ropean Squadron, 1869. 



64 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN NAPOLEON COLLINS. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 12th, 1834 j 
West India Squadron, 1834-5 ; attached to sloop Natchez, West India Squad- 
ron, 1837-8; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1839-40; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, July 16th, 1840 ; frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1842—4 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, November 6th, 1846 ; sloop Decatur, Home Squad- 
ron 1846-9; at Tuspan and Tobasco, Mexican war; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1850-3 ; commanding store-ship John P. Kennedy, North Pacific Expe- 
dition, 1853-4; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1854-5; 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1856-7; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1857-8; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1858-60; commanding 
steamer Anacosta, Potomac flotilla, 1861; engagement at Acquia Creek, May 
31st and June 1st, 1861; commanding gun-boat Unadilla, S. A. B. Squadron, 
1861-2 ; battle of Port Royal, November 7th, 1862 ; various expeditions on the 
coasts of South Carolina, Greorgia and Florida, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Octorara, West India Squadron, 
1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Wachusett, special service, 1863—4. 

On the 7th of October, 1864, Commander Collins, then in the Wachusett, 
seized the rebel steamer Florida, lying within the harbor of Bahia, Brazil. 
The capture was effected without loss of life. 

Commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Sacra- 
mento, special service, 1867. 



CAPTAIN REED WERDEN. 

Born in Pennsylvania, 1818. Appointed from Ohio, January 9th, 1834; 
attached to schooner Enterprise, Brazil Squadron, 1835 ; sloop Ontario, Brazil 
Squadron, 1836; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1837-8 ; Naval School, Phila- 
delphia, 1839 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 16th, 1840 ; West India 
Squadron, 1842-4 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1844-5 ; sloop Germantown, 
Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; commanded a party of seamen on shore at the capture 
of Tuspan; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 27th, 1847; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1848; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1849-52 ; rendezvous, Balti- 
more, 1853; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1854; special service, 1855-6; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, 1857; sloop Cumberland, coast of Africa, 
1857-9 ; commanding steamer Stars and Stripes, North Atlantic Blockadin'' 
Squadron, 1861; at capture of Roanoke Island and Newbern; commanding 
steamer Conemaugh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander July 16th, 1862; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864; Fleet 
Captain, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty, Navy Yard New 
York, 1866; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, California, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN STEPHEN D. TRENCHARD. 

Born in New York, July 10th, 1818. Appointed from New York, October 
23d, 1834; receiving-ship, New York, 1835-7; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1839-40 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 16th, 1840; sloop Preble, 



CAPTAINS. 65 

West India Squadron, 1841-4; sloop Fairfield, Home Squadron, 1844-5 
Coast Survey, 1845-9; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 27th, 1847 
sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1850-2 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1853 
Coast Survey, 1854-7; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1857-9 ^ 
commanding steamer Rhode Island, supply vessel to Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-5; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; two attacks on 
Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865; Navy Yard, New York 
1866-9 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; commanding steam-sloop 
Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869, 



CAPTAIN MELANCTON B. WOOLSEY. 

Born in New York, 1818. Appointed from New York, December 24th, 
1832 ; serving in Brazil Squadron, 1832-4 ; frigate United States, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1836-9; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1839—10; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 16th, 1840; frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 
1842-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1847 ; store-ship Southamp- 
ton, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50 ; brig Perry, Coast of Africa, 1851-4; unem- 
ployed from 1854-60 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1861 ; commanding steamer 
Ellen, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862. 

Engagement at the Wapper creek, May 30th, 1862, with a battery afterwards 
known as Fort Pemberton, and at the same time an attacking party of about 
three hundred rebel infantry at a distance of about four hundred and fifty yards. 
The insurgents were driven out of the forts and their infantry repulsed. En- 
gagement at Socessionville creek, June 1st, 1862, in which from two to three 
hundred rebel cavalry were dislodged and repulsed. Engagement of two hours' 
duration with batteries oh James Island, June 3d, 1862 ; co-operating with the 
army in their attempt to carry James Island batteries by assault. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Prin- 
cess Royal, W. G. B. Squadron, 1863-5. 

June 28th, 1863, engagement of three hours' duration at short musket- 
range, in defence of Donaldsonville and Fort Butler, against the attack of three 
thousand rebel troops under Generals Green and Dick Taylor, in which the 
enemy was repulsed with an acknowledged loss of fifteen hundred killed, 
wounded and*missing, including one hundred and twenty-fi.ve prisoners. 

Naval Observatory, Washington, 1865 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866; commanding steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; 
commanding flag-ship Guerriere, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



CAPTAIN ALEXANDER MURRAY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 22,1835 
attached to schooner Grampus, West India Squadron, 1836-8 ; steamer Poin 
sett, Atlantic coast, 1839-41 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 22d,1841 
sloop Vincennes, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; schooner Shark, Pacific Squadron 
1844-5; Home Squadron, 1846; at Tobasco, Tuspan, and "Vera Cruz, 
Coast Survey, 1846-9; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 12 th, 
5 



66 CAPTAINS. 

1847; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron 1849-51; receiving- 
Bhip, Norfolk, 1852-3 ; Coast Survey, 1858-60 ; commanding steamer 
Louisiana, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2; repulse of rebel steamer Yorktown, off 
Newport News, Sept., 1861 ; battle of Eoanoke Island, Feb. 8th, 1862 ; battle of 
Elizabeth river, with the fort and Lynch's fleet, February 10th, 1862 ; battle 
of Newbern, North Carolina, February 14th, 1862 ; engagement with Wise's 
division; battle of Winton, North Carolina, 1862 ; commanded naval forces at 
the battle of Kinston, North Carolina, 1862 ; commanded naval forces at the 
repulse of rebels, under Hill, from Newbern, North Carolina, February 14th, 
1862 ; commanded a naval and military expedition up the York and Pamunky 
rivers, which was entirely successful, destroying twenty-seven vessels, two 
large steamers among the number, and approaching to within eleven miles of 
Kichmoud, in the month of May, 1862. This expedition was afloat and the 
enemy in sight nearly all the time. Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 
1862 ; special duty. Sounds of North Carolina, 1863 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Augusta, special service, 
1866-7 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1869. 



CAPTAIN EDWARD DONALDSON. 

Born in Maryland, November 7th, 1816. Appointed from Maryland, July 
31st, 1835 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, West India Squadron, 1836-8; frigate 
Columbia, East India Squadron, 1839-40. 

While attached to frigate Columbia, took part in the attacks on forts on the 
coast of Sumatra, 1839. 

Promoted to Passed Midshipman, January 22d, 1841; in McLaughlin's 
Mosquito Fleet, in Florida, 1841-2 ; brig Truxton, 1841-44 ; sloop Ariel, 
Coast of Africa, 1845; Coast Survey, 1846; sloop Plymouth, East India 
Squadron, 1847-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, October 23d, 1847 ; brig 
Dolphin, East India Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Plymouth, 1851 ; rendezvous 
Baltimore, 1852 ; steamer Water Witch, river La Plata, 1853-^; steam-frigate 
Merrimac, special service, 1856-7 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1858-9 ; steamer 
San Jacinto, Coast of Africa, 1860-1 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1861 ; West 
Gulf Squadron,1861-2 ; passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Vicksburg 
batteries; commanding receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1862-3; coihmissioned as 
Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Keystone State, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; ordnance duty, Baltimore, 1865 ; receiving-ship, 
Baltimore, 1866-8; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; Navy Yard 



CAPTAIN THOMAS H. STEVENS. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, December 14th, 1836 ; 
a tached to razee Independence, Brazil Squadron, 1838-41 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman July Ist^ 1842 ; frigate Constellation, Home Squadron, 1842-4; 
Naval Store-keeper, Honolulu, 1845-8; Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1849 



CAPTAINS. 67 

commissioned as Lieutenant, May 10th, 1849 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1849-51 ; Coast Survey, 1852-5 ; steam-frigate Colorado, Home Squadron, 
1 859-60; commanding steamer Ottowa, S. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2; engagement 
with rebel fleet at Port-Royal, November 4th, 1861 ; engagement with rebel fleet 
and Ports Walker and Beauregard, November 5th and 7th, 1861 ; battle of 
Port-Eoyal Ferry, January 1st, 1862; capture of Fort Clinch, Fernandina and 
St. Marys, March 3d, 1862; expedition up St. Marys river and engagement 
with enemy's riflemen, March 6th, 1862 ; in command of expedition up St. 
Johns river, and capture of Fort Steele; fort on St. Johns Bluff and Mayport, 
Jacksonville, &c., during portions of March and April, 1862; commissioned as 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Maratanza, N. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1862 ; battle of West Point, May 7th, 1862; in command of gun-boats up 
Pamunkey river to White House, May, 1862, to open way for and in support of 
McClellan's army ; demonstration against Petersburg, Virginia, June, 1862 ; 
battle of Malvern Hill, in reserve ; capture of rebel gun-boat Teazer; command- 
ing steamer Sonoma, West India Squadron, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad Pa- 
tapsco, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4; engagement with Fort Wagner, August 
22d, 1863 ; engcgement with Fort Moultrie and Sullivan's Island batteries, 
August 31st, 1863 ; fall of Forts Gregg and Wagner, September 6th, 1863 ; 
engagement with Fort Moultrie and Sullivan's Island batteries on the 7th and 
8th of September, 1863 ; in command of boat assault on Fort Sumpter, night of 
September Stli, 1863 ; bombardment of Fort Sumpter from October 26th to 
November 4th, inclusive ; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf 
Squadron, 1864r-5 ; operations before Mobile from July 1st to August 2d, 
1864 ; attack on Fort Gaines, August 4th, 1864 ; commanded iron-clad Winne- 
bago, at battle of Mobile Bay, and capture of rebel fleet, August 5th, 1864 ; 
capture of Forts Powell and Gaines, and bombardment and capture of Fort 
Morgan, August, 1864; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; Light- 
house Inspector, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS PATTERSON. 

Born in Louisiana, May, 1820. Appointed from Louisiana, April 5th, 
1836 ; attached to West India Squadron, 1837-41 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1841-2 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 1st, 1842 ; brig Oregon, Survey 
of Tampa Bay, 1842-4 ; Coast Survey, 1844-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
June 2d, 1849; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1849-52; special duty, 
1853-5 ; sloop Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1855-7 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 
1858-9; steam-sloop Mohican, Coast of Africa, 1859-61; commissioned as 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-gunboat Choeura, N. A. B. 
Squadron, 1862 ; commanding steamer James Adger, N.A. B. Squadron, 1863-5 ; 
commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; commanding steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN C. HOWELL. 

Born in Pennsylvania, November 24th, 1819. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
June 9th, 1836 ; sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1837-41 ; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 1st, 1842 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squad- 



68 ' CAPTAINS. 

ron, 1842-4; brig Perry, East India Squadron, 1844-5; Naval Storekeper, 
Mao 1846-8; commissionedasLieutenant, August 2d, 1849; frigate Raritan, 
Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Saratoga, East India Squadron, 1851-3 ; re- 
ceiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1854-6 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate Min- 
nesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; battle of Hatteras Inlet ; 
commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Tahamo, 
Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commanding steamer Nereus, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; two actions at Fort Fisher, De- 
cember, 1864, and January, 1865 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; 
commanding rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1866-8 ; 'Fleet Captain, European 
Squadron, 1869. 



CAPTAIN DANIEL AMMEN. 

Born in Ohio, May 15th, 1820. Appointed from Ohio, July 7th, 1836; 
attached to store-ship Relief, 1837-9 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1841-2 ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 1st, 1842 ; sloop Vincennes, East India 
Squadron, 1845-7; Coast Survey, 1848-9; commissioned as Lieutenant, No- 
vember 4th, 1849 ; Coast Survey, 1850-2 ; steamer Water Witch, river La 
Plata, 185B-4 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1854-5 ; Naval Observa- 
tory, Washington, 1856-7 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; steam- 
frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1859 ; steam-frigate Roanoke, N. A.B. Squad- 
ron, 1861 ; commanding steamer Seneca, S. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2 ; battle of 
Port Royal, November 7th, 1861 ; Tybee Island, 1861 ; Port Royal ferry, 
January 1st, 1862 ; commanding monitor Patapsco, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863; 
Fort McAllister, March, 1863, and the attack on Fort Sumpter, April 2d, 1863 ; 
commanding steam-sloop Mohican, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on 
Fort Fisher, December 1864, January 1865 ; conjmanding iron-clad Miantono- 
mah, special service, 1866 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; special 
duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1866-7 ; commanding flag-ship Piscataqua, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; appointed Chief of Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1869. 



CAPTAIN EDWARD T. NICHOLS. 

Born in Georgia, March 1st, 1823. Appointed from Georgia, December 
14th, 1836; attached to sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1837-40; Naval 
School, Philadelphia, 1841-2 ; promoted to passed Midshipman, July 1st, 1842 ; 
frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-4; steamer Col. Harney, 
Atlantic Coast, 1845 ; frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1845-7 ; bomb-vessel 
Stromboli, Home Squadron, 1847-8; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 
1849-51; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 13th, 1850; Navy Yard, Pensa- 
cola, 1852-3; steam frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-6; Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1857-8 ; sloop Jamestown, Home Squadron, 
1858-60; commanding steamer Winona, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2 ; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip ; present at and re- 
ceived the surrender of Fort St. Philip, April 28th, 1862; attack upon and 



CAPTAINS. 69 



passage of Vicksburg batteries, June 28th, 1862; engagement with rebel ram 
Arkansas; bombardment and passage of Vicksburg batteries, July 15th, 1862; 
commissioned as Commander,July i6th^ 1862; commanding steamer Alabama, 
"West India Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Mendota, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; engaged with rebel battery at Four Mile creek, 
James river, June 16th, 1864; special duty, New York, 1866-8; commis- 
sioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866. 



CAPTAIN ROBERT H. WYMAN. 

BoKN iu New Hampshire, July 18th, 1822. Appointed from New Hamp- 
shire, March 11th, 1837 ; attached to sloop John Adams, Bast India Squadron, 
1838-t2 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1842-3 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 29th, 1843 ; brig Perry, East India Squadron, 1843-6 ; served in 
the Gulf on board the Princeton, Porpoise and Albany, during the Mexican 
war; present at the siege of Vera Cruz; Observatory, Washington, 1848 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1849-50; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1850 
sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2; Observatory, Washington, 1853^, 
practice-ship Preble, 1855-6 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; com- 
manding steamer Yankee, 1861 ; attached to S. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2 ; battle 
of Port Royal, November, 1861; commanding Potomac flotilla, 1862 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, July 16ih, 1862 ; commanding steamer Sonoma, in James 
river, and attached to West India Squadron, 1862-3 ; special duty, Washing- 
ton, 1863 ; special duty, Navy Department, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Captain, 
July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding steam-sloop Ticonderosa, European Squadron, 
1868-9. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE B. BALCH. 

Born in Tennessee, January 3d, 1821. Appointed from Alabama, Decem- 
ber 30th, 1837 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1840 ; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1843 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843 ; special 
duty, 1845. 

In war with Mexico. November 1st, 1846, engaged in first attack on Alvarado, 
by squadron under Commodore Connor ; engaged in active operations from May, 
1846, to surrender of Vera Cruz, March, 1847. In Mosquito Fleet, under Com. 
Tatnall, covered the landing of the army under General Scott, March 9th, 1847 ; 
at the time. Acting Master of the Falcon. March, 1847, engaged in the joint 
bombardment of Vera Cruz, with the army, and was present at the surrender of 
that city and the Castle of San Juan d'UHoa to the military and naval forces. 

Steamer Princeton, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1849-50 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 16th, 1850 ; sloop 
Plymouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-4. 

While on the Plymouth, Lieutenant Balch, in command of the advance post 
at Shanghai, China, was wounded in the hip, in a fight between the rebels and 
Imperialists. 



70 CAPTAINS. 

Navy Yard, WashiDgton, 1855-7 ; sloop Jamestown, Home Squadron, 1857-8 ; 
sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; frigate Sabine, 1860. 

While on the Sabine, fell in with the transport Governor, and rescued nearly 
four hundred marines, under Lieutenant Colonel Reynolds, the transport sink- 
ing under the Sabine's stern, November 24th, 1861. 

In command of steamer Pocahontas, South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2; 
volunteered for command of boats in taking possession of Tybee Island, 
December 26th, 1861. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862. 

Engaged rebel battery at Stono, South Carolina. In August, 1862, ascended 
Black river the distance of seventy-five miles, and drove rebel battery from 
earthworks, and engaged rebel infantry on the Bluffs. 

Commanding steamer Pawnee, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5. 

July 16th, 1863, was attacked by two batteries, the rebels making a simul- 
taneous attack on General Terry's forces. They were repulsed, and Commaoder 
Balch was informed by General Terry that he had saved his command. The 
Pawnee was struck forty-six times. On December 25th, 1863, the Marblehead 
was opened on by rebel batteries ; the Pawnee took an enfilading position in 
the Keowah river, and demoralized the enemy and caused him to retreat ; af- 
terwards captured two rebel guns. While in command of the Pawnee, Com- 
mander Balch engaged in the combined operations of the naval forces under 
Bear Admiral Dahlgren, and the army under General Foster, in Stono river. 
South Carolina, from July 3d to 11th, 1864, and particularly in the bombard- 
ment of Battery Pringle, on James Island, South Carolina. On the 9th of Feb- 
ruary, 1865, having with him the Sonoma and Daffodil, he ascended the Togoda 
creek, North Edisto, South Carolina, and engaged three rebel batteries of eleven 
or twelve guns, driving the rebels from their earthworks. The Pawnee was hit 
ten times, the Sonoma twice, and the Daffodil twice. 

Navy Yard, Washington, 1866-8; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866 ; commanding flag-ship Albany, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN FOXHALL A. PAEKEK. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Virginia, March 11th, 1839 ; attached 
to sloop Levant, West India Squadron, in 1 840 ; served in Florida against the 
Indians; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 29th, 1843; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1844-5; Coast Survey, 
1848; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850 ; commissioned Lieu- 
tenant, September 28th, 1850; steam frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 
1851-3 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5; unemployed 1856-60 ; Navy Yard, Washing- 
ton, 1860; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam 
gunboat Mahaska, 1863 ; in command of the naval battery on Morris Island 
during the bombardment of Fort Sumpter, from the 17th to the 23d of Aucrust. 
1863. ° ' 

Engaged in skirmishes with batteries on Potomac and Eappahannook rivers, 
and off Wilmington, North Carolina, and with rebel troops on shore, while 
commanding the Mahaska in 1863, and Potomac flotilla in 1864-5. On one 
occasion, at the head of a small detachment of soldiers and marines, with two 
howitzers manned by seamen. Commander Parker marched some distance into 



CAPTAINS. 71 

Virginia and drove the noted guerilla Fitzhugh, with a force of over one hun- 
dred cavalry, out of Matthevr's C. H., which he took possession of. 

Bureau of Navigation, 1866 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th 1866 • 
special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867-8; Navy Yard, Boston, 1869.' ' 



CAPTAIN JOHN GUEST. 



Born in Missouri. Appointed from Arkansas, December 16th 1837 • 
attached to sloop Warren, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; Naval School Phila- 
delphia, 1843; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843; steamer 
Poinsett, Survey of Tampa Bay, 1844-5 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 
1845-8 ; war with Mexico, San Gabriel, California, January 8th, 1848, Niesa, 
January 9th, 1848 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 24th, 1850 ; sloop 
Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1851-5 ; boarded with the cutter of the Ply- 
mouth, at Shanghai, 1854, the Chinese man-of-war. Sir H. Compton, and liber- 
ated a pilot-boat's crew who were under the protection of the American flag ; in 
April, 1854, was second in command of the Plymouth, under Captain John 
Kelley, in a severe and victorious action with the Chinese, at Shanghai, to pre- 
vent aggression on foreign residents ; special duty, Washington, 1855-6 ; ren- 
dezvous, Philadelphia, 1859; steam-frigate Niagara, W. G.B. Squadron, 1861; 
in command of the boats of Niagara, cut out the schooner Aid, then under the pro- 
tection of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, August, 1861; commanding steamer Owasco, 
W.^. B. Squadron, 1862; at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture of 
New Orleans, 1862; battles on the Mississippi up to, and including Vicksburg, 
1862 ; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad 
Lehigh, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Iosco, N. A. B. 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at the two attacks on Fort Fisher; commissioned as 
Captain, July, 25th, 1866; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. Hampshire, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN DONALD M. N. FAIRFAX. 

Born in Virginia, March 10th, 1823. Appointed from North Carolina, 
August 12th, 1837 ; attached to sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 
1838-42; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1842-3; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 29th, 1843 ; Coast Survey, 1844-5 ; frigate Columbus, East India 
Squadron, 1845-7 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 1847-9. 

During the Mexican war served on west coast of Mexico and California, and 
was at the capture of several towns, under Captain Du Pont. 

Frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1850-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 26th, 1851 ; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1855-6 ; steam frigate 
Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857-8 ; ordnance duty, New York, 1859 ; steamer 
Mystic, coast of Africa, 1860-61; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 
1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Cayuga, W. G. B. Squadron, 1862-8 ; on 
the Lower Mississippi, from June, 1862, to February, 1863, under Rear Admi- 
ral Farragut ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; in several attacks 
on defences of Charleston Harbor, under Rear Admirals DupontandDahlgren; 



72 CAPTAINS. 

Naval Academy, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; com- 
manding flag-ship Rhode Island, N. A. Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Susquehanna, flag-ship N. A. Squadron, 1867-8 ; Ordnance duty, 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN M. B. GLITZ. 

Born in New York, March 10th, 1823. Appointed from Michigan, August 
12th, 1837 ; attached to sloop Ontario, West India Squadron, 1838-42; Navail 
School, Philadelphia, 1843; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843 ; 
sloop St. Marys, Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-5; sloop Falmouth, Home 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; bomb-brig Hecla, Home Squadron, 1847 ; capitulation of 
Castle of San Juan d'TJlloa and capture of Tuspan ; steamer Petrita, Home 
Squadron, 1847-8 ; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, April 6th, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; steam- 
frigate Mississippi, Bast India Squadron, 1852-5; special duty, Washington, 
1856; sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9; steam-sloop Iroquois, 1861; 
commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Penobscot, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Juniata, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Osceola, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; at both attacks on Fort Fisher; Navy 
Yard, Boston, 1866 ; commissioned cs Captain, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding 
steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN ANDREW BRYSON. 

BoUN in New York, 1822. Appointed from New York, December 21st, 
1837; attached to sloog Ontario, West India Squadron, 1888-42; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1842-3; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843; 
sloop Decatur, Coast of Africa, 1843-5; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1845-9 ; store-ship Erie, 1850-1 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 30th, 
1851; brig Bainbridge, Coast of Africa, 1851-5; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1853-5; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1856-8; sloop Preble, Brazil 
Squadron, 1858-9 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1861 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Chippewa, special service, 
1862-3; commanding iron-clad Lehigh, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863; at the re- 
duction of Fort Macon, and in all the principal actions in which the iron-clads 
were engaged off Charleston, from September 22d, 1863, to April 5th, 1864 ; 
wounded slightly by fragment of shell off Charleston ; commanding the iron- 
clad Essex, Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5; commissioned as Captain, July 
25th, 1866; commanding steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1866-9; command- 
ing receiving-ship, Boston, 1869. 



CAPTAIN JAMES H. SPOTTS. 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from Kentucky, Au"-ust 2d, 1837 • 
attached to_ sloop John Adams, East India Squadron, 1838-42; Naval School, 
Philadelphia, 1842-3; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843; 



CAPTAINS. 73 

store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
November, 21st, 1851 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5; rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, 1855-7 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1857-8 ; sloop 
Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; frigate Sanbee, 1861 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 16, 1862 ; commanding steamer Magnolia, E. Gr. B. Squadron, 
1862 ; commanding steamer South Carolina, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4; com- 
manding steamer Powhatan, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; in both engagements 
with Fort Fisher, November, 1864, and January, 1865 ; in the engagement with 
Fort Anderson, and engagements alongthe banks of the Cape Fear River, Feb- 
ruary, 1865 ; also, at the bombardment of the batteries above Dutch Gap, James 
river, April, 1865 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 1866; Navy Yard, 
Mare Island, California, 1866-7. 



CAPTAIN J. W. A. NICHOLSON. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, February 10th, 1838; 
attached to sloop Warren, West India Squadron, 1838-42 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1842-4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1844; steamer 
Princeton, special service, 1844-6; store-ship Fredonia, Home Squadron, 
1847-8; frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 1849-50; store-ship Southampton, 
Pacific Squadron, 1851-2; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 24, 1852 ; sloop 
Vandalia, East India Squadron, 1853-5; Navy Yard, New York, 1856-7; 
sloop Vincennes, Coast of Africa, 1857-60. 

In 1861, attached to steamer Pocahontas, which vessel started to relieve 
Fort Sumpter, but reached Charleston too late, Sumpter capitulating shortly 
after the arrival of the Pocahontas, April 1st, 1861. Engagement with rebel 
batteries at Acquia Creek, Potomac river, 1861 ; commanding steamer Isaac 
Smith, S. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2; action with rebel fleet, November, 1861 ; 
battle of Port Royai, November 7th, 1861 ; engagement with rebel flotilla in 
the Savannah river, February, 1862 ; engagement with rebel infantry near 
Jacksonville, Florida. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty, New York, 
1863; S. A. B, Squadron, 1864; commanding iron-clad Manhattan, W. Gr. B. 
Squadron, 1864 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; bombardment of 
Fort Morgan, from- August 9th to August 20th, 1864; commanding steamer 
Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Captain, July 25th, 
1866; special duty, New York, 1867-8 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS G. CORBIN. 

Born in Virginia, August 13th, 1820. Appointed from Alabama, May 15th, 
1838; attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1838-42; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 1844; Coast Survey, 1844-5; 
frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; Coast Survey, 1847-50 ; sloop St. 
Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 ; Commissioned as Lieutenant, June 10th, 
1852 ; steamer Princeton, 1852-3 ; Survey of the river La Platta, 1853-5 ; 
Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1855-6 ; receiving-ship, New York, 



74 CAPTAINS. 

1857-8 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; on leave, 
1860; steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; 
capture of Eorts Beauregard and Walker and Port Royal, South Carolina, April, 
1861 ; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; Commandant of Mid- 
shipmen, Naval Academy, 1863 ; commanding steamer Augusta, 1864-5 ; Fleet 
Captain, West India Squadron, 1865-6; commissioned as Captain, July 25th,. 
1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 
1868 ; member of Examining Board, 1869 ; at present, on special duty. 



CAPTAIN LOUIS C. SARTORI. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 22d, 1829; 
attached to sloop Warren, Brazil Squadron, 1831—4 ; frigate Constellation, W. I. 
Squadron, 1832 ; sloop Natchez, W. I. Squadron, 1836-7 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 14th, 1837 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; war 
with Mexico, at capture of Tobasco Mediterranean Squadron, 1850; razee Inde- 
pendence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1851-2 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1853 ; 
Naval Asylum, Norfolk, 1854 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 185-5-6; 
expedition and fight with a tribe of Fegees ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859 ; 
commissioned as Commander, April 7th, 1861 ; commanding steamer Flag, 
Blockading Squadron, 1861; commanding receiving-ship, Boston, 1862; com- 
manding sloop Portsmouth, W. G. B. Squadron, 1863-5 ; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, September, 26th, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Ossipee, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868. 



CAPTAIN JAMES P. ARMSTRONG. 

BoEN in New Jersey, November 20th, 1817. Appointed from New Jersey, 
March 7th, 1832; attached to frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1833-36 ; sloop Boston, West India Squadron, 1837 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 23d, 1838 ; schooner Enterprise, Home Squadron, 1839-40 ; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1842-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 8th, 
1842 ; sloop Vincennes, East India Squadron, 1845-6 ; receiving-ship, Phila- 
delphia, 1847-9; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50; sloop Albany, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1853-5 ; sloop Jamestown, 
Coast of Africa, 1855-7 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1858; commanding steamer 
Sumpter, Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as Commander, April 
27th, 1861; commanding State of Georgia, N. A. B. Squadron, 1862-6 ; bom- 
bardment and surrender of Port Macon, and combined attack of military and 
naval forces, April 25th, 1862 ; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 18G2 ; 
commanding steam-sloop San Jacinto, E. G. B. Squadron, 1864; Commandant 
Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1865-8. At present, in charjre of iron-clads. 
New Orleans. 



CAPTAINS. 75 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM RONCKENDOEEF. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 17th, 1832 ; 
attached to steamer Porpoise, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; frigate Constitu- 
tion, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
23d, 1838 ; brig Consort, Coast Survey, 1839-41 ; sloop Preble, Mediterranean 
Squad.'-oc, 1842-8 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1843-5 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, June 28th, 1843 ; Pacific Squadron, during the Mexican war, 
winter of 1846, on the road to Angelos, California; sloop Portsmouth, Coast of 
Africa, 1849-51; receiving-ship, New York, 1852 ; frigate Cumberland, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1852--4 ; sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 1855; 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1857-8 ; commanding steamer N. W. Chapin, Brazil 
Squadron and Paraguay Expedition , 1859; commissioned as Commander, June 
29th. 1861 ; commanding steamer Water Witch, 1861 ; commanding steam-sloop 
San Jacinto, N. A. B. Squadron, 1862 ; battle of Sewell's Point and capture of 
Norfolk, May, 1862; commanding steam-sloop San Jacinto, E. G. B. Squadron, 
1863; commanding steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship West India Squadron, 
1863—4; special duty. New York, 1865; commanding iron-clad Tonawanda, 
1866 ; commissioned as Captain, September 27th, 1866 ; commanding receiv- 
ing-ship, Philadelphia, 1867 ; naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1869. 



CAPTAIN JAMES C. WILLIAMSON. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, January 7th, 1832 ; 
attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833 ; frigate Con- 
stellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1834; sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 
1836; Naval School, New York, 1837-9; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 8th, 1839; Navy Yard, New York, 1840; receiving-ship New York, 
1841-4; commissioned as Lieutenant, November 25th, 1844; sloop Vincennes, 
East India Squadron, 1845-6; Home Squadron, 1848 ; sloop St. Louis, Brazil 
Squadron, 1849-51 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1852-3 ; steam-sloop San 
Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-8. 

In 1856, engaged in sounding out the channel in a ship's boat nnder fire from 
the fort on the Canton river, at which time one man was killed in the boat. 

Executive Officer, steam-sloop Brooklyn, special service, 1861; in charge of 
the landing of the troops at Fort Pickens, Florida, in 1861; commis- 
sioned as Commander, April 15th, 1861 ; commanding steamer Penguin, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commanding steamer Flag, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty, New Orleans, 1866 ; commissioned 
as Captain, October 10th, 1866; Navy Yard, Boston, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN ALBERT G. CLARY. 



BoEN in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, May 8th, 1832 ; 
attached to sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1834-6; Naval School, New 
York, 1837 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 8th, 1839; sloop Marion, 
Brazil Squadron, 1839-42; receiving-ship, Boston, 1843-5; commissioned as 



76 CAPTAINS. 

Lieutenant, April 11th, 1845 ; sloop Preble, Home Squadron, during war with 
Mexico; at Tuspan and Tobasco; sloop Preble, Pacific Squadron, 1847-50 ; re- 
ceiving-ship, Boston, 1852 ; sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1853 ; frigate Con- 
stitution, Coast of Africa, 1854-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
1856-7 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squadron, 1858-9 ; steam-frigate 
Colorado, 1861 ; commanding steamer Anacostia, Potomac flotilla, 1861 ; en- 
gagement at Acquia Creek, May 31st and June 1st, 1861 ; battle of Port E.oyal, 
November 7th, 1861 ; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; com- 
manding steamer Mt.Vernon, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; com- 
manding steamer Tioga, West India Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Dacotah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding steam-sloop 
Seminole, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding receiving- 
ship, Norfolk, 1866; commissioned as Captain, November 21st, 1866. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE H. PREBLE. 

Born in Maine, February 25th, 1816. Appointed from Maine, October 
10th, 1835 ; attached to frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1836-7 ; West India Squadron, 1839-40 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 22d, 1841 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1843 ; sloop St. Louis, East India 
Squadron, 1843-5; sloop' Cjane, Pacific Squadron, 1845; Home Squadron, 
1846-7 ; Mexican war, attack upon Alvarado, August 8th, and October 16th, 
1846 ; Tampioo, Laguina, Vera Cruz, Alvarado, April 1st, 1847 ; brig Dolphin, 
Bast India Squadron, 1847-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 5th, 
1848 ; Coast Survey, 1850-2 ; frigate Vermont, East India Squadron, 1852-3 ; 
sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 1854-6. 

October 27th, 1854, November 1st and 3d, 1854, November 13th, 1854, 
engagements with Chinese pirates; July 10th, 1855, destroyed three piratical 
junks, while convoying a fleet of Chinese boats ; August 27th, 1855, destroyed 
two piratical junks. 

Light-house Inspector, 1857 ; Navy Yard^ Boston, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Nar- 
ragansett. Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; commanding steamer Katahdin, W. G. 
B. Squadron, 1862 ; attack on, and passage of, Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and 
Chalmette batteries; capture of New Orleans; at Vicksburg, June 29th, 1862 ; 
commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1863 ; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, 
W. G. B. Squadron, 1862; commanding sloOp St. Louis, S. A. B. Squadron, 
1863-5; battle of Honey Hill, South Carolina, November 30th, 1864; three 
actions at Deveraux's Neck, South Carolina, December 6th, 7th and 9th, 1864; 
special duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1866-8; commissioned as Captain, January, 
1867 ; commanding steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship N. P. Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN EGBERT THOMPSON. 

BoEN in New York, 1822. Appointed from New York, March 13th, 1837 ; 
Exploring Expedition, 1838-42; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 
1843; brig Somers, special service, 1843-4; frigate Cumberland, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1845 ; Home Squadron, 1846-7. 



^ CAPTAINS. 77 

Jresican war, participated in all the active operations of the fleet up to June, 
1847, including the attack on Tobasco, Alvarado, Tuspan, and the bombardment 
of Yera Cruz. 

Steamer Michigan, on. the lakes, 1848-50; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 27, 1850; sloop Decatur, Home Squadron, 1851-2; receiving-ship 
New York, 1853-5 ; sloop St. Louis, Coast of Africa, 1856-8 ; Ordnance duty' 
Washington, Navy Yard, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 1861; commanding 
iron-clad Pittsburg, Mississippi Squadron, 1861-2. 

Participated in attack en Fort Donaldson, attack on Island No. 10 and float- 
ing ba,ttery ; ran batteries of Island No. 10 and took part in the attack on the 
batteries opposite New Madrid, and in the engagement with rebel rams above 
Fort Pillow. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; naval rendezvous, Phila- 
delphia, 1863-4; commanded the steamer Com. McDonough, S. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; commanding steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 
1866-7; commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1867. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE H. COOPER. 

BoRisr in New York. Appointed from New York, August 14th, 1837 ; at- 
tached to_ fleet operating on Coast of Florida, 1837, and was constantly employed 
co-operating with the army in boat expeditions against the Seminole Indians ; 
frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1838-42 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1843; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23d, 1843 ; schooner Flirt, Home 
Squadron, 1846-7. 

The Flirt reported for duty to General Zaohary Taylor in March, 1846. 
Passed Midshipman Cooper commanded a detachment of men at Point Isabel, 
Texas, under Major Monroe of the U. S. Army, previous to and after the battles 
of 8th and 9th of May. After capture of Monterey was transferred to Commo- 
dore Connor's squadron, and was in both attacks on Tobasco, and attacks on 
Alvarado and Tuspan. Served in the squadron until the reduction of the 
Capital. 

Receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1847-8 ; Naval Station, Norfolk, 1849-50 ; steam- 
frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1850-55 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, May 8th, 1851; rendezvous, Norfolk, 1856 ; ordnance duty, Norfolk, 
1857 ; steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1861; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; 
commanding steamer Massachusetts, supply vessel, Atlantic Squadrons, 1862 ; 
commanding steamer Mercedita, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863. 

Was seven weeks in command of monitor Sangamon, inside of Charleston 
Roads, employed on picket duty, and acting in concert with the army, con- 
stantly shelling Fort Sumpter and the batteries on Sullivan's Island ; stationed 
in Stono Inlet, South Carolina, as senior officer, co-operating with the army 
in expeditions against the enemy, and frequently engaged at short range. 

Commanding steamer Sonoma, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanding 
steamer Glaucus, B. G. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Winooskie, 
special service, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Captain, 
December 2d, 1867. At present, under orders to command steam-frigate Colo- 
rado, Asiatic Squadron. 



78 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES H. B. CALDWELL. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Connecticut, February 27tli, 1888 ; 
serving in Mediterranean Squadron, 1838-40 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, May 20th, 1844 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1845 ; frigate United 
States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847; brig Boxer, Coast of Africa, 1848-9; 
sloop Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1849-50; Navy Yard, Boston, 1852; commis- 
. sioned as Lieutenant, September 4th, 1852 ; sloop Vandalia, East India Squad- 
ron, 1853-4; Light-house Inspector, 1855-7 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 
1858-9; defeated a tribe of Cannibals, at Wega, one of the Fejee Islands, and 
burned their town October 11th, 1858, with a detachment of seamen and 
marines from the sloop Vandalia ; steamer Keystone State, special service, 1861 ; 
commanding steamer Itasca, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862; bombard- 
ment and passagfe of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and Chalmette batteries, and 
capture of New Orleans ; Grand Gulf, Mississippi river, June 10th, 1862; com- 
missioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad Essex, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; Port Hudson, from March to July, 1863, in 
command of Essex and mortar flotilla ; commanding steamer Glaucus, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; commanding steamer R. R. Cuyler, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; present at surrender of Wil- 
mington; naval rendezvous, Boston, 1866-9; commissioned as Captain, Decem- 
ber 12th, 1867. 



CAPTAIN HENRY K. DAVENPORT. 

Born in Georgia, December 10th, 1820. Appointed from Georgia, Febru- 
ary 19th, 1838 ; attached to frigate United States, 1838-42; steamer Union, 
1843 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 1844; Coast Survey, 1845 ; 
frigate Columbia, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; Observatory, Washington, 1848-9 ; 
mail steamer Ohio, 1849-52; commissioned as Lieutenant, December igth, 
1853 ; steamer Princeton, 1854-5 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856 ; 
sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1858 ; bombardment and storming of 
the lower six forts. Canton river, China, November, 1856; Ordnance duty, 
Washington, 1859-60; sloop Cumberland, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861; Forts 
Hatteras and Clark, August, 1861 ; repulse of rebel steamer Jamestown, in 
James river, December, 1861; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862; 
commanding steamer Hetzel, N. A. B. Squadron, 1862^. 

Roanoke Island, February, 1862, in command of Hetzel and division of five 
gunboats; Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and destruction of entire rebel naval 
force in sounds of North Carolina, February 10th, 1862 ; battle and capture of 
Newborn, North Carolina, April, 1862 ; defence of Fort Anderson, Nense river, 
and repulse of Pettigrew's army, March 14th, 1863 ; received a letter of thanks 
from General commanding United States forces ; defence of Newbern and re- 
pulse of Hoke's army, May, 1864; senior officer in command of sounds, North 
Carolina, from June 1862 to June 1864, and accompanied the army on expedi- 
tions wherever gunboats could go. 

Commanding flag-ship Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1864-6. 

Capture of seven pirates on board the American steamer Salvador, off bay of 
Panama, while in command of Lancaster, November 10th, 1864. Received 
thanks of Navy Department. 

Navigation and equipment duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 1867-9 ; commis- 
sioned as Captain, March 14th, 1868. 



CAPTAINS. 79 

CAPTAIN NAPOLEON B. HARRISON. 

Born in Virginia, February 19th, 1823. Appointed from Virginia, Febru- 
ary 26th, 1838 ; attached to schooner Enterprise, Atlantic Coast, 1839-40 ; 
receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1843 j store-ship Erie, Coast of Africa, 1845-6; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 1844 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1847-8. 

Served in California, during the war with Mexico, as a volunteer in the expe- 
dition that rescued G-eneral Kearney's command. Volunteered to carry informa- 
tion from San Francisco to Monterey in the Portsmouth's launch ; and was out 
five days in a gale of wind. 

Observatory, Washington, 1850 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, January 6th, 1853; Naval Storekeeper, East India Squadron, 
1853-4; store-ship Supply, East India Squadron, 1855; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1856—7 ; sloop Cumberland, Coast of Africa, 1858-9 ; sloop Jamestown, 1861 ; 
commanding steamer Cayuga, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862. 

The Cayuga was the flag-ship of Captain Bailey, Farragut's second in com- 
mand, and led the line of vessels at the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
and up to the city of New Orleans. Lieutenant Commanding Harrison was 
specially commended in the official reports for his gallantry and the skillful man- 
ner in which he fought his vessel. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Ma- 
haska, James river flotilla, during the operations of McClellan before Rich- 
mond and his retreat to Harrison's Landing ; commanding steam-frigate Minne- 
sota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862—3; attached to South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; took part in the operations on the South 
Carolina coast, from the early part of 1863 to the fallof Charleston, in 1865; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Captain, 
April 28th, 1868; Commandant of Midshipmen at Naval Academy, Annapolis, 
1868-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN C. FEBIGER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Ohio September 14th, 1838 
attached to frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1838-40 ; sloop Concord 
Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 1844 
frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1844-5 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron 
1846-7 ; frigate Columbus, Pacific Squadron, 1848 ; sloop Dale, 1850 ; Coast Sur 
vey, 1852-7; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 30th, 1853 ; sloop Germantown 
East India Squadron, 1858-60; sloop Savannah, 1861; commissioned as Com 
mander, August 11th, 1862 ; commanding the steamer Katahdin, W. G. B 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagement off Mobile Bay, April 3d, 1862 ; commanding 
steamer Mattabesset, N. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5; engagement with rebel ram 
Albemarle, in Albemarle Sound, May, 1864 ; commissioned as Captain, May 
6th, 1866 ; commanding steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; com- 
manding steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



80 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN PEIKCE CROSBY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 5th, 1838 ; 
attached to frigate Ohio, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839 ; frigate Congress, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1843 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 
1844 ; Coast Survey, 1845-6 ; sloop Decatur, Home Squadron, during Mexi- 
can war; at Tobasco and Tuspan ; schooner Petrel, Home Squadron, 1848; 
store-ship Relief, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1851-2 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1853-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 3d, 1853 ; sloop Germantown, Brazil Squadron, 1854-7 ; receiving- 
ship, Philadelphia, 1858; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1859-60. 

In the spring and summer of 1861, served in Chesapeake Bay, keeping open 
the communication between Annapolis and Havre de Grace, and in capturing 
and destroying rebel vessels in the Bay ; sloop Cumberland, N. A. B. Squad- 
ron, 1861 ; forts Hatteras and Clark, 1861 ; commanding steamer Pinola, W. G. 
B. Squadron, 1862 ; served under Admiral Farragut, and co-operated with mor- 
tar fleet in bombardment of forts Jackson and St. Philip ; present at bombard- 
ment and passage efforts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and cap- 
ture of New Orleans ; also, in bombardment, passage and re-passage of batteries 
at Vicksburg, and engagement with the ram Arkansas. 

Commissioned as Commander, September 2d, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad 
steamer Sangamon, 1863 ; commanding steamer Florida, N. A. B. Squadron, 
1863-4 ; engagement with the rebels at Masonboro' Inlet, North Carolina, while 
destroying four blockade-runners ; commanding steamer Metaeomet, W. G. B. 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanded Metaeomet in attack on Mobile, and planned 
and constructed torpedo drag-nets for Blakely river ; superintended the removal 
of torpedoes in Blakely river, and occupied forts Huger and Traeey on the 
night of the evacuation by the rebel forces ; commanded Shamokin, South At- 
lantic Squadron, 1866-8; commissioned as Captain, May 27th, 1868; member 
of Examining Board, 1869. At present, attached to Norfolk Navy Yard. 



CAPTAIN RICHARD T. RENSHAW. 

BouN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 26th, 1838 ; 
attached to frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1838-40 ; steamer Missouri, 
Home Squadron, 1842-4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 1844; 
steamer Col. Harney, 1845-6 ; schooner Onkahie, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8 ; 
receiving-ship New York, 1851 ; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1852 ; re- 
signed, June 29th, 1852, and re-entered the service as Acting Lieutenant, in 
1861; commanded steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-4 ; capture of Roanoke Island, February 8th, 1862; Washington, North 
Carolina, September 6th, 1862; defence of Washington, North Carolina, April, 
1863, and several actions of minor importance ; commissioned as Commander, 
September 22d, 1862 ; commanding steamer Massasoit, North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1864-5 ; several engagements on James river in 1864—5 ; com- 
manding steamer Agawan, Atlantic Squadron, 1855-6 ; navigation duty, Norfolk 
Navy Yard, 1866-9 ; commissioned as Captain, 1869. 



CAPTAINS. 81 

CAPTAIN JOHNSTON B. CREIGHTON. 

Born ia Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, February 10th, 
1838 ; attached to frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1840 ; frigate 
Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1843 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 
1844; brig Truxton, Coast of Africa, 1844-6; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron 
1846-7; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1848-50 ; steamer Michigan 
on the lakes, 1850-2 ; frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-5 
commissioned as Lieutenant, October 9th, 1853 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1856-8 
steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; commanding steamer Ottawa, 
S. A. B. Squadron, 186J ; commissioned as Commander, September 20th, 1862 
special duty, 1863 ; commanding steamer Mahaska, S. A. B. Squadron 
1863-4. 

From August 8th to August 21st, 1863, bombarding Forts Wagner and 
Gregg, Morris Island, South Carolina, while in command of the Mahaska. 

Commanding the steamer Mingo, S. A. B. Squadron, 1864-5 ; ordnance 
duty, New York, 1866-7; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-9; commissioned as Captain, November 26; 1868; at present, special 
duty, New York. 



CAPTAIN AARON K. HUGHES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Now York, October 20th, 1838; 
attached to frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1840; receiving-ship, Nor- 
folk, 1842-3; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 2Sth, 1844; attached to 
frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 
1846-7 ; steamer Michigan, ou the lakes, 1848-9 ; receiving-ship, New York, 
1849-50 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1850-2 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
185.3; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 9th, 1853; sloop Decatur, 
Pacific Squadron, 1854-6 ; store-ship Supply, Brazil Squadron, 1856-8; rendez- 
vous, Baltimore, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; commanding steamer 
Mohawk, S. A. B. Squadron, 1862-3; commissioned as 'Commando^ September 
16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Cimarron, S. A. B. Squadron, 1863-4 ; seve- 
ral engagements with the rebels on the Atlantic Coast, 1861-4; ordnance duty, 
Mound City, Illinois, 1864-6; Light-house Inspector, 1867-8; commissioned as 
Captain, 1869. 



CAPTAIN EDMUND R. COLHOUN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Missouri, April 1st, 1829 ; attached 
to sloop Marion, Brazil Squadron, 1839-40 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1841-3 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 2d, 1845; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1846. 

Mexican war, in the first attack on Alvarado, under Commodore Connor, and 
under Commodore Perry at the first attack on Tobasco, and afterwards at its 
capture • served as Passed Midshipman on board the armed prize-schooner Nonata. 

Receivino^-ship, Philadelphia, 1848-9; sloop Albany, Pacific Squadron, 
1849-50; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1850-1 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific 
6 



82 CAPTAINS. 

Squadron, 1852-3; resigned, June 27th, 1853 ; re-entered the service as Acting 
Lieutenant in 1861 ; commanded steamer Hunchback, North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1861-2; battle of Roanoke Island, February 7th and 8th, 1862 ; 
capture of Newborn, March 14th, 1862 ; engagements oa the Blackwater river, 
below Franklin, Virginia, October, 1862 ; commissioned as Commander, Novem- 
ber 17th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Ladona, North Atlantic Blockading 
-Squadron, 1863; commanding monitor Weehawken, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; in the different actions with Forts Sumpter, Wagner, Beaure- 
gard, &c., from July 10th to September 15th, 1863 ; commanding monitor 
Saugas, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; engaged Hewlett's 
Battery on James river, June 21st, and again December 5th, 1864, took part in 
bombardment of Fort Fisher, December 25th, 1864, and the different engage- 
ments until its capture January 15th, 1865 ; special duty, New York, 1866 ; 
Fleet Captain, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned as Captain, 1369; 
at present, commanding iron-clad Dictator, North Atlantic Squadron. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES H. BALDWIN. 

Born in New York, December 23d, 1822. Appointed from New York, April 
24th, 1839 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-40 ; 
Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843-5 ; promoted to passed Midshipman, July 2d, 
1845 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; war with Mexico, opera- 
tions in neighborhood of Mazatlan, during the time that place was in possession 
of the United States naval forces, from November, 1847, to June, 1848 ; two 
engagements with the enemy; resigned February 28th, 1854, and re-entered the 
service as Acting Lieutenant in 1861 ; commanded steamer Clifton at the pass- 
age of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and capture of New Orleans ; also, at first 
attack 00 Vicksburg, 1862 ; commissioned as Comnoander, November 18th, 
1862; commanding steamer Vanderbilt, special service, 1863-4; ordnance 
duty, Dlare Island Navy Yard, California, 1864-7; Fleet Captain, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Captain, 1869; at present, on duty at Mare 
Island Navy Yard, California. 



CAPTAIiNS ON RETIRED LIST. 



CAPTAIN RICHARD W. MEADE. 

Born in Spain. Appointed from Pennsylvania April 1st, 1826 ; attached to 
frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1827-30 ; sloop St. Louis, West India 
Squadron, 1833-5 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 14th, 1834 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, December 20th, 1837; Navy Yard, New York, 
1839; store-ship Erie, 1843-5; Navy Yard, New York, 1845; unemployed, 
1849-51 ; commanding steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squadron, 1853-5 ; com- 
missioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855 ; commanding receiving-ship. 
New York, 1861-4 ; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
steamer San Jacinto, E. Q-. B. Squadron, 1864-6. 



CAPTAINS. 83 

CAPTAIN ALEXANDER GIBSON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, July 4th, 1822. Attached 
to frigate Constellation, 1827-9 j promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 
1883 ; sloop Ontario, Brazil Squadron, 1833-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 28th, 1838 ; schooner Shark, Pacific Squadron, 1838-40 ; receiving- 
ship, New York, 1841-3; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1843-5; sloop 
Albany, Home Squadron, 1846-8; receiving-ship, New York, 1850-2; sloop 
St. Louis, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-3; commissioned as Commander, 
September 14th, 1855; commanding store-ship Supply, N. A. B. Squadron, 
1860-2 ; commanding store-ship Potomac, W. Gt. B. Squadron, 1864-6; retired, 
1865 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES W. PICKERING. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, May 1st, 
1822 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, 1829-31 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1832-5 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1833 ; sloop 
Boston, West India Squadron, 1835-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 
8th, 1838 ; steam-ship Fulton, Atlantic Coast, 1838-40 ; sloop Yorktown, Pa- 
cific Squadron, 1841-3; sloop Preble, Coast of Africa, 1843-5; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1846-8; commanding sloop Warren, Pacific 
Squadron, 1848-50; sloop Oyane, Home Squadron, 1853-4; Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1855-7; commissioned as Commander, Septem- 
ber 14th, 1855 ; Light-house Inspector, 1859-60 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Kearsarge, special service, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Captain, July 16th, 1862 ; 
commanding steam-sloop Housatonic, 1863-4: ; commaading steamer Vander- 
bilt, 1864-6; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 1866-7 ; retired, 1868. 



CAPTAIN OVERTON CARR. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Indiana, March 1st, 1827 ; 
attached to frigate Java, Mediterranean Squadron, 1828-9; frigate Delaware, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1829-30; Naval School, Norfolk, 1832-3; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1833 ; sloop John Adams, Blediterranean 
Squadron, 1834-6 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1888-40 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, December 8th, 1887 ; special service, 1842-5 ; sloop Germantown, 
Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1849-52 ; 
ordnance duty, 1852-4; steam-frigate San Jacinto, survey of the River La 
Plata, 1854-5; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1858-60; commanding steamer 
Quaker City, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; retired, 1861 ; com- 
manding receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1861-2 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1864-5 ; 
commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



84 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN BAKNAED J. MOELLER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, April 1st, 1827; 
attached to sloop Natchez, West India Squadron, 1828-30 ; sloop Ontario, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1830-1; Naval School, Norfolk, 18.31-3 ; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1833 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1834; ren- 
dezvous, New York, 1835-6 ; Coast Survey, 1837^0 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, December 9th, 1839 ; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1846-50 ; 
retired, September 13th, 1855; special duty. New York, 1860-5; commission- 
ed as Commander, July 10th, 1861 ; special duty, Ellis' Island, New York, 
1867 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN ROQER PEERY. 

BoKN in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, July 1st, 1828 ; schooner 
Grampus, West India Squadron, 1834 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
14th, 1834 ; frigate Constellation, West India Squadron, 1835-8 ; receiving- 
ship, Baltimore, 1839-41 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; 
steamer Union, special service, 1844-5 ; on Coast of Africa, 1846-7 ; frigate 
United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-9 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
1850-1 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-3 ; rendez- 
vous, Baltimore, 1854-5 ; commissioned as Commander, September 14th, 1855; 
retired," 1861 ; commanding store-ship Fredonia, Pacific Squadron, 1863-4; 
commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE M. WHITE. 

Born in Georgia. Appointed from Georgia, November 1st, 1828 ; attached 
to sloop Natchez, in the West Indies, 1829-32 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 14th, 1834 ; sloop Concord, West Indies, 1836-9 ; sloop St. Louis, 
Pacific Squadron, 1840-2; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1841 ; 
brig Somers, Home Squadron, 1843-5 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 
1849-51 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1852 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1853 ; 
retired, 1855 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN STEPHEN DECATUR. 

BosN in New Jersey. Appointed from New Hampshire, March 17th, 1829 ; 
frigate Constellation, Baltimore, 1829 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 1833 ; sloop 
Vincennes, Brazil Squadron, 1834-6 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 
3d, 1835; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 25th, 1840; unemployed from 
1835 to 1850 ; sloop Saratoga, East India Squadron, 1851-4 ; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1855 ; on reserved list, 1857 ; commissioned as Commander, July 
20th, 1861; waiting orders, 1864-6 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAINS. gg 

CAPTAIN EDWARD C. BOWEES. 

BoKN in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, February 2d 1829- 
attached to sloop-of-war St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1829-32 ■ Navy Yard' 
Boston, 1834 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 3d, 1835 : frigate Con- 
stellation, West Indies 1836-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1839; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, April 26th, 1841 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1842-5; ordnance trans- 
port Jilectra, 1847; sloop-of-war Decatur, Coast of Africa, 1847-50 : sloop Ply- 
mouth, East Indies, 1851-2 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1852-4 ; retired, 1855 • 
rendezvous, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1863 ; commissioned as Commander' 
^d7, r ' ' commanding receiving-ship Vandalia, Portsmouth, N. H ' 

1864-5 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. ' 



CAPTAIN DOMINICK LYNCH. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 2d, 1829; 
attached to frigate Delaware, Mediterranean Squadron, 1830-3 ; frigate United 
States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 3d, 1835; sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1837-41; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, April 26th, 1841 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1844-5 ; sloop Plymouth, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; steamer Mississippi, 
Home Squadron, 1846-S ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1849-52 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1853-5 ; retired, 1855 ; unemployed from 1855 to 1861 ; steamer 
Daylight, N. A. B. Squadron, 1861-2; commissioned as Commander, July 
21st, 1866 ; at Hatteras Inlet, Forts Hatteras and Clark ; commanding brig 
Bainbridge, Aspinwall, 1862-3; commanding ordnance ship, St. Lawrence, 
186-3-5 ; commissioned as Captain, 1865; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Norfolk," 
1865-6 ; Naval Storekeeper, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-7; Naval Asylum, 
Philadelphia, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES THOMAS. 

Born m Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 2d, 1829; attached 
to sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1829-32 ; sloop Peacock, Brazil Squadron, 
1832-4 ; Naval School, Norfolk, 1834-5 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 3d, 1835; frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1886-9 ; receiv- 
ing-ship, New York, 1839-40 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 
1841 ; frigate Constitution, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
1846-7; sloop Germantown, Home Squadron, during Mexican war; receiving- 
ship, Baltimore, 1850-1 ; unemployed from 1851 to 1863; special duty, Philadel- 
phia, 186-3^ ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN AUGUSTUS S. BALDWIN. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 2d, 1829 ; 
attached to sloop Warren, Brazil Squadron, 1830-3; Brazil Squadron, 1834; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1835; frigate Constellation, West India Squad- 



86 CAPTAINS. 



ron, 1835-6; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 1836; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; Exploring Expedition, 
1838-42; rendezvous, New York, 1846-8; Coast Survey, 1848-52; re- 
tired 18o5 ; reinstated on active list, 1859 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific 
Squadron, 1859-60 ; commissioned as Commander, April , 24th, 1861 ; com- 
manding steamer Wyandotte, Potomac flotilla, 1861 ; commanding store-ship, 
Vermont, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; Inspector Navy Yard, New York, 
1862-6 ; commissioned as Captain, 1866 ; Light-house Inspe'ctor, 1867. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM B. WHITING. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 2d, 1825 ; at- 
tached to sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1831-4 ; frigate Constellation, 
West India Squadron, 1885-7; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 4th, 
1836; Coast Survey, 1838-43; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 
1841 ; frigate Macedonian, Coast of Africa, 1843-5 ; Observatory, Washing- 
ton, 1846-50; Coast Survey, 1851-2; sloop Vandalia, East India 'Squadron, 
1852-6; retired, 1855; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1861-9; commis- 
sioned as Commander, July 21st, 1861 ; commissioned as Ca-ptain, 18G7. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES HUNTER. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, April 25th, 1831 ; 
attached to frigate Potomac, Pacific Squadron, 1831-4 ; frigate Constitution, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 183 5-6; Navy Yard, New York, 1837; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1837 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1838-40 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; sloop Concord, Brazil 
Squadron, 1840-3 ; sloop Saratoga, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; brig Bainbridge, 
Brazil Squadron, 1846-7; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; retired, 
1855; commanding steamer Montgomery, W. G. B. Squadron, 1861-2; com- 
missioned as Commander, April 21st, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, July 
25th, 1866. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS M. BRASHER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, June 6th, 1831 ; attached 
to sloop Palmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1831-4 ; frigate Potomac, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1834-6 ; Naval School, New York, 1837 ; promoted to Passed Blid- 
shipman, June 15th, 1837 ; sloop St. Louis, Pacific Squadron, 1839-42 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 
1842-3 ; brig Lawrence, Home Squadron, 1844-5 ; frigate Cumberland, Home 
Squadron, during the Mexican war; sloop Germantown, Brazil Squadron, 



CAPTAINS. 87 

1850-1; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacifio Squadron, 1851-5 j Navy Yard, New 
York, 1855-6 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1856-7 ; rendezvous. New 
York, 1859-60 ; commissioned as Commander, April 24tli, 1861 ; commanding 
brig Bainbridge, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; retired, 1862 ; 
Navy Yard, Pensacola, 186-3-4 ; special duty, 1865 ; commanding store-ship, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867 ; Light-house 
Inspector, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN SAMUEL R. KNOX. 

Born iu Massachusetts. Appointed from Blassachusetts, April 1st, 1828 ; 
attached to sloop Vandalia, Brazil Squadron, 1828-.31 ; schooner Dolphin, Pacific 
Squadron, 1832-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 15th, 1837 ; Ex- 
ploring Expedition, 1838-42 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 
1841 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1849-50 ; commanding steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 ; re- 
ceiving-ship, Boston, 1852-3; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1854-5; re- 
tired, 1855; commanding rendezvous, Boston, 1862-5; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN EDMUND LANIER. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Tennessee, July 9th, 1831 ; attached to 
schooner Experiment, special service, 1832-3 ; sloop Vandalia, West India 
Squadron, 1833-5 ; sloop St. Louis, AVest India Squadron, 1836 ; Naval School, 
Norfolk, 1837 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1837 ; Navy 
Yard, Norfolk, 1838-40 ; schooner Grampus, Home Squadron, 1840-3 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; sloop Falmouth, Home Squad- 
ron, 1845 ; receiving-ship Baltimore, 1846; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 
1846-7; Home Squadron, 1848-9; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1851-2; steam- 
frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-4 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-5; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1855-8; receiving-ship, Norfolk; 
1858-60 ; commanding steamer Alabama, Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; com- 
missioned as Commander, April 29th, 1861 ; commanding receiving-ship, Bos- 
ton, 1862^; retired in 1864 ; commanding receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1S64-5; 
commanding Ordnance Station, JeflFerson Barracks, Missouri, 1866-7; commis- 
sioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN FEANCIS LOWRY. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont, August 3d, 1831 ; attached 
to schooner Grampus, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; frigate Brandywine, Pa- 
cific Squadron, 18-34-7 ; Naval School, New York, 1838; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, June 23d, 1838 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1839-41 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, July 4th, 1843 ; Coast Survey, 1845-6; retired in 1855 ; unem- 
ployed from 1846-69 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



88 CAPTAINS. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE M. COLVOCORESSES. 

Born in Greece. Appointed from Vermont, February 21st, 1832 ; attached 
to frio-ate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1836-7 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, June 23d, 1838 ; Exploring Expedition, 1838-42; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, October 7th, 1843 ; schooner Shark, Pacific Squadron, 1844-6 - 
steamer Alleghany, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-9 ; sloop Germantown 
Coast of Africa, 1851-2 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1853-5 ; sloop Levant, 
East India Squadron, 1855-8; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire 
1858-60; commanding store-ship Supply, 1861-3; commissioned as Com 
mander, July 1st, 1861 ; commanding sloop Saratoga, S. A.B. Squadron, 1864, 
commanding sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6 ; retired, 1867 ; com- 
missioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS S. HAGGERTY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 17th, 1832 ; 
attached to schooner Experiment, Chesapeake Bay, 1832-3 ; sloop Ontario, 
Coast of Brazil, 1833^ ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-7; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 23d, 1838 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific 
Squadron, 1838-9 ; rendezvous, New York, 1840-42 ; Coast Survey, 1842-5 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, December 19th, 1843 ; steamer Mississippi, Home 
Squadron, 1844-6 ; brig Bainbridge, Coast of Africa, 1849-50; receiving-ship. 
New York, 1850-2; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1852-5; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, 1855-7; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1857-9 ; brig Perry, East Gulf Squadron, 1860; retired, 1861 ; ordnance 
duty, Boston, 1861-6 ; commissioned as Commander, October 11th, 1861 ; com- 
missioned as Captain, 1867 ; in charge of iron-clads. New Orleans, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS BROWNELL. 

Born in Rhode Island. Entered the service as Sailing Master, October 
30th, 1840 ; commissioaed as Lieutenant, July 26th, 1843 ; Sackett's Harbor, 
1845-6; special service, 1847-9 ; unemployed from 1849-55 ; retired, 1855 ; 
unemployed from 1855-69 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN MATTHIAS 0. MARIN. 

Born in Florida. Appointed from Florida, January 3d, 1832 ; attached to 
schooner Porpoise, "West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; sloop John Adams, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1834-7; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 23d, 1838; 
rendezvous. New York, 1839-40 ; sloop Vandalia. Home Squadron, 1841-3 • 
commissioned as Lieutenant, Blarch 29th, 1844'; sloop Yorktown, coast of 
Africa, 1844-6; Coast Survey, 1847-9 ; sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, 



CAPTAINS. 89 

1852-3 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1855 ; retired, 1855; restored to active 
list, 1857 ; sloop Macedonian, 1861 ; commissioned as Commander, October 
IStli, 1861 ; commanding sloop St. Louis, special service, ^1862-3 ; ordnance 
duty, Navy Yard, Boston, 1864-5 ; retired, 1864 ; ordnance duty, Norfolk Navy 
Yard, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867 ; special duty, Maiden, Massa- 
cliiisetts, 1869. 



CAPTAIN SAMUEL PEARCE. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, March 30th, 1833 ; 
attached to frigate Brandywine, Pacific Squadron, 1834-7; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 8th, 1839; schooner Enterprise, Atlantic Coast, 1839-41; 
unemployed from 1841-69 ; retired, 1855 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN A. DAVIS HARRBLL. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Tennessee, January 4th, 1834 ; attached 
to schooner Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1834-6 ; frigate North Carolina, Pacific 
Squadron, 1836-9; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1840; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 16, 1840 ; steamer Union, special service, 1843-5 ; sloop 
Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, May 17th, 
1847 ; brig Porpoise, Coast of Africa, 1847-9 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1850-2 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Home Squadron, 1852-3 ; receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, 1853—4; Coast Survey, 1855; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1858-60 ; commanding steamer Thomas Freeborn, 1861 ; commisioned 
as Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam-gunboat Chickopee, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanding steam-sloop Kearsarge, 
European Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



CAPTAIN MATTHEW C. PERRY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 1st, 1835 ; attached 
to frigate Potomac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1835-8 ; frigate United States, 
Pacific Squadron, 1839-41 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 22d, 1841; 
brjg Somers, special service, 1842-3 ; frigate Macedonian, Coast of Africa, 
1844-5; sloop Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1845-7; with the army in Mex- 
ico, 1848 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 3d, 1848 ; sloop Vincennea, 
Pacific Squadron, 1849-52; Coast Survey, 1852-5; retired, 1855; restored to 
active list, 1858; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1859-60; steam-sloop Pow- 
hatan, special service, 1861; retired, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



90 COMMANDERS. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES S. McDONOUGH. 

Born io Connecticut. Appointed from New York, April 8th, 1835 ; at- 
tached to frigate United States, Mediterranean Squadron, 1836-9 ; sloop Cyane, 
Blediterranean Squadron, 1839-40; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 22d, 
ISrtl ; brig Dolphin, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; brig Truxton, Coast of Africa, 
1844-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, May 16th, 1848 ; sloop Warren, Pacific 
Squadron, 1849-51; sloop Falmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-2 ; frigate Con- 
stitution, Coast of Africa, 1853-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1856; steam-frigate 
Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8; frigate Sabine, Brazil Squadron, 1858-9; 
sloop Constellation, Coast of Africa, 1860; retired, 1861 ; receiving-ship, New 
York, 1864; receiving-ship Vandalia, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1865 ; 
commissioned as Captain, 1867. 



COMMANDER ROBERT W. SHUPELDT. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 11th, 1839 ; attached 
to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41 ; brig Bainbridge, Home 
Squadron, 1842-4; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1844-5; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; Coast Survey, 1845-6 ; frigate United States, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1846-7; sloop Marion, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1847-8 ; mail-steamer Atlantic, 1849-50 ; promoted to Master, February 21st, 
1853; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1854; resigned, June 20th, 1854; rein- 
stated, with rank of Commander, November 19th, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Proteus, Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; commanding steam-sloop 
Hartford, flag-ship. East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; commanding steam-sloop 
Wachusett, Asiatic Squadrun, 1806-8 ; commanding naval rendezvous. New 
York, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER ALEXANDER C. EHIND. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Alabama, September 21st, 1838 ; at- 
tached to sloop Cyane, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-42 ; Naval School Phi- 
ladelphia, 1844-5 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; Coast 
Survey, 1845-6 ; Home Squadron, during Mexican war ; present at Alvarado 
and Tobasco; brig Perry, Coast of Brazil, 1847; steamer Water Witch, 
Home Squadron, 1848; sloop St. Marys, East India Squadron, 1849-50; 
Coast Survey, 1850-4; promoted to Master, April 30th, 1853; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, February 17th, 1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1855; sloop Constellation, Coast of Africa, 1859-61; com- 
mandingsteam gun-boat Crusader, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862. 

Participated in various small affairs at North Edisto; shore fight at Seabrook's 
Plantation, South Carolina, the crew of Crusader defeating rebel mounted force; 
capture and destruction of rebel works commanding South Edisto, Da who and 
Pow-Pow rivers, for which received thanks of the Department. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
steamer Seneca, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; eommandin"' iron- 



COMMANDERS. • 91 

clad steamer Keokuk, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862-3; commanding Keo- 
kuk in attack on defences of Charleston, April 17th, 1863. 

In this engagement the Keokuk was struck ninety times in thirty minutes, 
nineteen shots pierced her through, at, and just below the water-line. Finding 
it impossible to keep his vessel afloat under such an extraordinary fire, Com- 
mander Rhind withdrew from action ; being in smooth water he managed to 
keep her afloat during the night, although the water was pouring into her in 
many places, but at 7.80 A. M., on the following morning, she went down ; the 
oflicers and crew wero saved, but lost all their effects. 

Commissioned as Commander, January 2d, 1863 ; commanded steamer Paul 
Jones, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863, and took part in various 
engagements with Fort Wagner and other defences of Charleston ; commanded 
steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
commanding steam gun-boat Agawan, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5, and on duty in James river from May to October, 1864. 

Engagement with rebel batteries at Deep Bottom, August 13, 1864. Rear 
Admiral Lee, in his report of this affair, thus speaks of Commander Rhind : 
" I take great pleasure in calling the attention of the Department to the gal- 
lantry and endurance displayed by Commander Rhind of the Agawan, and 
the officers and men under his command, in the engagement with three rebel 
batteries, August 13th, 1864, reported to the Department by Captain Smith, 
divisional commander on the James river." Commander Rhind received thanks 
of Department in letter dated September 7th, 1864. In December, 1864, Com- 
mander Rhind was detailed by Admiral Porter to command the powder-boat 
Louisiana, and on the night of the 23d, that vessel was exploded within two 
hundred and fifty yards of Port Fisher, the officers and men being taken off by 
the steamer Wilderness. Rear Admiral Porter in his official report to the 
Navy Department, says : " In conclusion, allow me to draw your attention to 
Commander Rhind and Lieutenant Preston. They engaged in the most 
perilous adventure that was, perhaps, ever undertaken. As an incentive to 
others I beg leave to recommend them for promotion. No one in the Squadron 
considered that their lives would be saved, and Commander Rhind and Lieu- 
tenant Preston had made an arrangement to sacrifice themselves in case the 
vessel was boarded, a thing likely to happen." 

Commanding receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1866-7 ; commanding 
naval rendezvous, New York, 1868. 



COMMANDER GEORGE M. RANSOM. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Ohio, July 25th, 1839 ; attached to 
sloop Marion, Brazil Squadron, 1839-42 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 
1848-4; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 2d, 1845 ; served seven months in squadron commanded by Commodore 
David Connor, and subsequently by Commodore M. C. Perry, on the Coast of 
Mexico, in 1847; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1847-8 ; sloop Portsmouth, 
Coast of Africa, 1848-51; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1852; steamer 
Michican, on the lakes, 1858 ; promoted to Master, June 28th, 1853 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1854; brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 
1855-6; sloop Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1856-7; ordnance duty, Boston, 
1858-9 ; steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; commissioned as 



92 COMMANDERS. 

Lieutenant-Comtnander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Kineo, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; several engagements with gun- 
boats, Mississippi river, in March and April, 1862 ; passage of forts Jackson 
and St. Philip, April, 1862 ; engagement with rebel ram Manasses, April, 1862 ; 
in Jlay, 1362, engagement with a field battery, Grand Gulf, Mississippi, which 
battery had just fired into the transport steamers, killing and wounding several 
of General Williams' brigade; Baton Kouge, August 5th, 1862, it was stated 
officially that the sheila from the Kineo and Katahdin in the forenoon caused 
General Breckenridge's army to fall back suddenly and in a demoralized condi- 
tion ; engagement with rebel battery and guerillas, below Donaldsonville, 
October 4th, 1862 ; commissioned as Commander, January 2d, 1863 ; comman- 
ding steamer Grand Gulf, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; com- 
manding steamer Museoota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
on duty at League Island, Pennsylvania, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM F. SPICER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from same State, June 21st, 1839 ; attached 
to brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1839^0 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 
1841-3 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843-5 ; Passed Midshipman, July 2d, 
1845 ; brig Dolphin, Coast of Africa, 1846-7 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1848; 
frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853 ; promoted Master, June 
28th, 1853; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1854 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 25th, 1854; sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, 1855; sloop 
Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1857-8; Navy Yard, Boston, 1859; 
steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1862-3 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commissioned as 
Commander, January 2d, 1863 ; commanding steamer Cambridge, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; in engagement at Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; special 
duty, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866; commanding steam- 
sloop Daootah, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER SOMERVILLE NICHOLSON. 

Born in New York, January 1st, 1822. Appointed from New York, June 
21st, 1839 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839-40 ; 
brig Truxton, 1841-3; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; Coast Survey, 1846-7 ; steamer Alleghany, 
Brazil Squadron, 1848-9; Coast Survey, 1849-52; steam-frigate Powhatan, 
East India Squadron, 1852-4 ; promoted to Master, September 9th, 1853 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, May 5th, 1855 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, Bast India 
Squadron, 1855; ordnance duty, Washington, 1856-7; sloop Cumberland, 
Coast of Africa, 1858-9; sloop Macedonian, Home Squadron, 1860-1; comman- 
ding steam gunboat Marblehead, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; 
commissioned as Lieutenant Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, January 2d, 1863 ; commanding steamer State of Georgia, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding steamer Galatea, West 
India Squadron, 1865; special duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 1866-8; mem- 
ber of Ordnance Board, 1869. 



COMMANDERS. 93 

COMMANDER WILLIAM E. HOPKINS. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, November 13th, 1839; at- 
tached to sloop Vandalia, Home Squadron, 1841-3 j Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1845; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 2d, 1845; frigate Cumberland, 
1847 ; schooner Falcon, Home Squadron, 1848-9 ; Coast Survey, 1850-1 ; 
sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1851-5 ; promoted to Master, December 2d, 
1853 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 10th, 1854 ; receiving-ship, Phila- 
delphia, 1856-8; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60; sloop 
Preble, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; ren- 
dezvous, Philadelphia, 1862 ; commanding steamer Saginaw, Pacific Squadron, 
1863-5; commissioned as Commander, November 4th, 1863; commanding 
steamer Shamrock, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; League Island, Pennsylvania, 
1868. 



COMMANDER PAUL SHIRLEY. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Tennesseee, July 25th, 1839 ; attached 
to sloop Warren, West India Squadron, 1839-41 ; schooner Shark, Pacific 
Squadron, 1842-4 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; frigate Cumberland, 1845-6 ; steamer Alleghany, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1847 ; Coast Survey, 1848-9 ; receiving-ship, Phila- 
delphia, 1850-1 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 
1853—4; commissioned as Master, 1854; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 21st, 
1854 ; frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1857-8 ; receiving-ship, 
Philadelphia, 1859-60 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1860-62 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding sloop Cyane, 
Pacific Squadron, 1863-4; commissioned as Commander, November 5th, 1863; 
commanding steamer Suwanee, Pacific Squadron, 1865—7; Fleet Captain, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868; commanding receiving-ship Independence, Mare 
Island, California, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER H. N. T. ARNOLD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, March 13th, 1839 ; at- 
tached to frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1839-41; brig Boxer, Home 
Squadron, 1842-4 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1844-5 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; steamer Colonel Harney, 1846 ; Home Squadron, 
1846-7 ; mail-steamer Pacific, 1850-1 ; sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 
1851-5; promoted to Master, 1854; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
12th, 1854; Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1856-7; steam- 
frigate Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; steam-sloop Saranao, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1859-60; steamer Mohawk, Blockading Squadron, 1861; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Mystic, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commanding steamer Mercedita, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commanding steamer Chickopee, At- 
lantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1865. 



94 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER THOMAS -PATTISON. 

Born in New York, February 8th, 1832. Appointed from New York, 
March 2d, 1839; attached to sloop St. Louis,_ Pacific Squadron, 1839-42; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1843 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845;' promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 2d, 1845 ; transport Electra, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; 
steamer Scorpion, Home Squadron, 1847-9 ; Coast Survey, 1850-1 ; sloop 
Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5 ; promoted to Master, 1854 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 12th, 1854 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1855-6 ; 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1857; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 
1858-60; Naval Station, Saokett's Harbor, New York, 1860-1; sloop Perry, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1861; Executive oiEcer of the Perry at the time of cap- 
ture of the privateer Savannah, oif Charleston, June 4th, 1861 ; commanding 
steamer Philadelphia, Potomac flotilla, 1861 ; engagement with Acquia creek 
batteries, October 1st, 1861 ; and engagement with Potomac river batteries the 
latter part of October, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, -Tuly 
16th, 1861; commanding steamer Sumpter, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1863; Commandant Naval Station, Memphis, 
Tennessee, 1863-6; commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; command- 
ing steamer Muscoota, Atlantic Squadron, 1866—7 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
1867-9. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM N. JEFPERS. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, September 25th, 1840 ; 
attached to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1840-3; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1844-5 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1846 ; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 11th, 1846 ; steamer Visen, Home Squadron, 1846-7; 
Mexican war — attacks on Alvarado, San Juan d'Ulloa and Vera Cruz ; capture 
of Tuspan and of Tampico; Coast Survey, 1848—50; mail-steamer Falcon, 
1851-2 ; promoted to Master, June 12th, 1854 ; sloop Germantown, Brazil 
Squadron, 1853-4; commissioned as Lieutenant, January 30th, 1855; steamer 
Water Witch, river La Plata, 1856 ; special duty, Washington, 1857-S ; steam- 
sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-frigate Roanoke, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commanding steamer Underwriter, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; capture of Roanoke Island, Elizabeth 
City and enemy's squadron, and numerous skirmishes in Albemarle Sound, 
1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding 
iron-clad" Monitor," on James river, 18G2 ; attack on batteries at Sewell's Point, 
Virginia, May, 1862, and battle of fort Darling, May 15th, 1862; ordnance 
duty, Philadelphia, 1862-3; ordnance duty, Washington, 1864-5; commissioned 
as Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; commanding steamer Swatara, special ser- 
vice, 1865-6; commanding steamer Swatara, European Squadron, 1867-8; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER EDWARD SIMPSON. 

Born in New York, 1824. Appointed from New York, February 11th 
1840 ; attached to ship Independence, 1840-3 ; frigate Congress, Brazil Squad- 



COMMANDERS. 95 

ron, 1845; Naval School, Philadelphia, ]846; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, July 11th, 1846 ; steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 1847; war with Mexico, 
present at Alvarado, Tobasco and Vera Cruz ; Coast Survey, 1848-9 ; frigate 
Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854 ; promoted to Mas- 
ter, July 10th, 1854; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18th, 1855; Coast 
Survey, 1855-6 ; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1856-7 ; engaged 
■with Captain Foote in the bombardment of the barrier forts in the Canton river, 
1856; Naval Academy, 1859-61; commissioned as Lieutenant Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; Commandant Midshipmen Naval Academy, 1862-3; com- 
manding iron-clad steamer Passaic, South Atlantic BlookaJing Squadron, 
1863—4 ; engagement with Fort Wagner, July 29th, 1863 ; Fort Sumpter, 
August 17th, 1863 ; Port Wagner, August 18th, 1863 ; Fort Sumpter, August 
22d, 1863 ; Fort Moultrie, August 31st, 1863 ; Fort Sumpter, September 1st, 
1863; battery Bee, September 8th, 1863; Fort Moultrie, November 16th, 
1863 ; commanding steamer Isonomia, Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864 ; Fleet Captain of Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 , engaged 
in operations before Mobile, from March 27th, 1865, to April 12th, 1865, 
when the city capitulated ; commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; 
commanding steam sloop Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; in charge 
Hydrographical-Office, Washington, 1869. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM G. TEMPLE. 

Born in Vermont, March 3d, 1824. Appointed from Vermont, April 18th, 
1840 ; attached to frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1840-3 ; frigate 
Potomac, Home Squadron, 1845 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1846 ; steamer 
Scourge, Home Squadron, 1846-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11th, 
1846; capture of Alvarado, March 31, 1847; capture of Tuspan, April 18th, 
1847; capture of Tobasco, June, 1847 ; Coast Survey, 1849-50; sloop Levant, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 185.3-5; promoted to Master, July 21st, 1854; Coast 
Survey, 1855-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April, 1857 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant- Commander, July 16th, 1862; ordnance duty. New York, 1862 ; 
Fleet Captain, Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer 
Pontoosuck, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Attack on Fort Fisher, December 24 and 25, 1864 ; capture of Port Fisher, 
January, 1865 ; capture of Fort Anderson, February 18th, 1865 ; capture of 
Fort Lee and Wilmington, North Carolina, February 21st-22d, 1865 ; bom- 
bardment of rebel batteries at Dutch Gap, James river, April 2d, 1865. 

Commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; commanding steamer Taeony, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 1867-9. 



COMMANDER SAMUEL P. CARTER. 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed from Tennessee, February 14th, 1840; at- 
tached to sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, 1841-4 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1845 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1845; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, July 11th, 1846 ; Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; present at capture of Vera 



96 COMMANDERS 

Cruz ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1847-8 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; Naval Academy, 1851-3 ; store-ship Relief, 1853-5 ; 
promoted to Master, September 12th, 1854 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 
18th, 1855 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-7 ; at attack 
on Barrier Forts, Canton river, China, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1858-60. On 
July 11th, 1861, Lieutenant Carter was ordered to report to the Secretary of 
War for duty. 

Appointed Brigadier General in September, 1861, and assigned to the Ten- 
nessee Brigade; present at Wild Cat, Kentucky, at Zollicoffer's repulse, 1861, 
and at the battle of Mill Spring, January, 1862 ; at Cumberland Gap, March 
and May, 1862 ; at capture of Cumberland Gap, June 17th, 1862; in Kanawha 
Valley, in October and November, 1862, at which time the rebel troops were 
driven out ; commanded cavalry expedition into East Tennessee, and tore up 
track of Tennessee and Virginia Rail Road in December, 1862, and January, 
1863 ; defeated rebel troops at Holstien and Jonesville ; at battle of Button's 
Hill, March 81st, 1863 ; defeated Pegram's forces at Monteville, Beaver Dam, 
in May and June, 1863. 

In July, 1863, was assigned to command of cavalry division, and had the ad- 
vance when Burnside occupied East Tennessee, in August and September, 1863 ; 
present at siege and battle of Knoxville, December, 1863 ; Provost Marshal 
General of East Tennessee, from September, 1863, to January, 1865, when he 
was relieved at his own request, and ordered to North Carolina, and assigned to. 
the command of a division ; commanded the left wing at the battle of Kingston, 
North Carolina, on 10th of March, 1865, when Bragg was defeated; occupied 
Goldsboro', driving out the rebels with his command ; assigned to command of 
3d division of 23d army corps, April 7th, 1865 ; breveted Major General, March 
13th, 1865; commanding 23d army corps from July, until relieved from duty 
in North Carolina, August, 1865; honorably mustered out of the army, Janu- 
ary, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, June 25th, 1865; commanding steamer Monocacy, Asi- 
atic Squadron, 1867-9. At present, on duty at Navy Yard, Philadelphia. 



COMMANDER THOMAS S. PHELPS. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, January 17th, 1840 ; attached to 
sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop Boston, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11th, 
1846; schooner Nautilus, Coast Survey, 1847-9; razee Independence, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1849-51; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; receiving-ship Norfolk, 
1853; sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7; promoted to Master, 1854; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1854 ; battle of Seattle, Wash- 
ington Territory, January 26th, 1856; ordnance duty, Norfolk, 1857-8; steamer 
Westernport, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-60 ; Coast Sur- 
vey, 1860-1 ; commanding steamer Corwin, North Atlantic Blockadins Squad- 
ron, 1861-2. ° '■ 

Engagement with rebel gun-boat Curlew, at Hatteras Inlet, October, 1861 ; 
three engagements with Yorktown batteries, 1862. 

1 o«o"'™^^^°'^®'^ ^^ Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; Coast Survey, 
18bd-4; commandmg iron-clad Saugas, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 



COMMANDEKS. 97 

1864-5 ; commanding steam-sloop Juniata, at capture of Port Fisher, January, 
1865 ; commissioned as Commander, August 5th, 1865 ; commanding steamer 
Lenapee, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 
1867-9. 



COMMANDER JOHN MADIGAN". 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, February 19th, 1840; attached to 
sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-4 ; sloop Boston, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1S44-6 ; bomb-brig Vesuvius, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; during the -war 
■with Slexico, present at Tuspan, Tobasoo, and at capture of "Vera Cruz; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, July 15th, 1846; Coast Survey, 1848-50; sloop Sara- 
toga, East ludia Squadron, 1851-4; promoted to Master, 1855; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1855; steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding sloop Vincennes, "Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; ordnance duty, Boston Navy Yard, 1864; com- 
manding iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 186 i-5; 
Commissioned as Commander, September 22d, 1865 ; commanding steamer 
Paul Jones, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6 j Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER EDWARD BARRETT. 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed from Louisiana, November 3d, 1840 ; at- 
tached to sloop Preble, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-3 ; frigate Columbia, 
Brazil Squadron, 1843-5 ; sloop Falmouth, Mediterranean Squadron, 1845-6; 
promoted to Passed Blidshipman, July 11th, 1846; during Mexican war, pres- 
ent at Alvarado, Vera Cruz, Tuspan, Tobasco, and in expedition to Laguna; 
sloop Jamestown, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-1 ; frigate Cumberland, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14, 
1855 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856 ; frigate Congress, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1857 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1858 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1859 ; steamer San Jacinto, Coast of Africa, 
1860 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; commanding sloop Vincennea, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gun-boat Massasoit, 1863-4 ; commanding 
iron-clad Catskill, South Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, December 24th, 1865 ; temporary ordnance duty. Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, 1866 ; commanding steamer Agawan, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7; commanding steamer Quinebang, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER HOMER C. BLAKE. 

Born in New York, 1822. Appointed from Ohio, March 2d, 1840 ; frigate 
Coustellation, East India Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop Preble, Coast of Africa, 
1843-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; sloop Preble, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, July lltb, 1846; receiving-ship, New York, 

7 



98 COMMANDERS. 

1849-50 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1853-6; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; frigate St. Law- 
rence, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9; frigate Sabine, Home Squadron, 1861-2; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer 
Hatteras, Western Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

On 11th of January, 1868, the Hatteras, while at Anchor off Galveston, 
Texas, was ordered by signal from the Brooklyn, flag-ship of the division block- 
ading Galveston, to chase a sail to the southward and eastward. Commander 
Blake at once obeyed the signal, and steamed with all speed in the direction 
indicated, and rapidly gained upon the suspicious vessel, which was discovered 
to be a steamer. When within about four miles of the vessel, it was observed 
that she had ceased to steam, and was lying " broadside on," awaiting the ap- 
proach of the Hatteras. When at about the distance of seventy-five yards, 
Commander Blake hailed, and asked " What steamer is that?" The reply was 
" Her Britanic Majesty's ship Vixen." Captain Blake ordered a boat to be sent 
aboard; but before the order could be obeyed, the commander of the strange 
craft hailed, and said "We are the Confederate steamer Alabama," which was 
accompanied by a broadside. The Hatteras returned the fire almost instantly, 
and steamed directly for the Alabama in the hope to carry her by boarding ; 
but the attempt was defeated by the commander of the piratical craft. 

At length a shell entered the hold of the Hatteras, and at the same instant 
another shell passed through the " sick-bay," exploding in an adjoining com- 
partment and setting fire to the vessel. Still another shell entered the cylinder, 
filling the engine-room and deck with steam, and depriving Commander Blake 
of all power to manoeuvre his vessel or work the pumps, upon which the reduc- 
tion of the fire depended. With the vessel on fire in two places, and her engine 
disabled, Commander Blake felt that it was useless to sacrifice the lives of his 
command, and so ordered a lee gun to be fired. The Alabama then asked if 
assistance was desired, to which an affirmative answer was given. After con- 
siderable delay, the Alabama sent assistance, and the crew and officers of the 
Hatteras were transferred to the Alabama. Ten minutes after the crew left her 
decks, the Hatteras went down, bow first. 

The battery upon the Alabama brought into action against the Hatteras num- 
bered seven guns, consisting of four long 32-pounders, one 100-pouuder rifled 
gun, one 68-pounder, and one 24-pounder rifled gun. The guns used in the 
action by the Hatteras, were two short 32-pounders, one 30-pounder rifled Par- 
rott, and one 20-pounder rifle gun. The action was fought at a distance of about 
seventy-five yards. The crew of the Hatteras were landed at Porf^Koyal, Ja- 
maica, and were with all dispatch conveyed from Port-Royal to Kingston, under 
the guidance of the American Vice-Consul, John N. Camp. 

Commanding steamer Utah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 186.S-5 ; 
shelled with three divisions of rebel army at Malvern Hill, 1864 ; assisted to 
repulse an attack of the rebels on the right of the army of the James, October, 
1864; engagement with rebel batteries at Trent Reach, James river, 1865 ; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, March 3d, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Swatara, European Squad- 
ron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER CLARKE H. WELLS. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 25th, 
1840 ; attached to razee Independence, Home Squadron, 1842-4 ; sloop Levant, 



COMMANDERS. 



99 



Pacific Squadron, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 11th, 1846; Home Squadron, 1846-7; present at Vera Cruz; sloop Ply- 
mouth, East India Squadron, 1848-50; brig Dolphin, East India Squadron, 
1851 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1852 ; store-ship at Valparaiso, 1852-5 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1856 ; in 1856 attached to barque Resolute, which vessel was 
originally an English man-of-war, abandoned in the Arctic seas, and subse- 
quently recovered and brought to the United States by the American whale 
ship, "George Henry;" Congress, by joint resolution, dated August 28th, 
1856, having purchased her from the salvors, and ordered her restoration to 
the British government, she sailed for England, November 13tb, 1856; Lieu- 
tenant Clarke H. Wells, being one of her officers; steam-frigate Susquehanna 
Home Squadron, 1858 ; steamer Metacomet, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding, sloop Vandalia, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1863; commanding 
iron-clad steamer G-alena, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; commanding steamer Kansas, Brazil Squadron, 1866-8 ; 
commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER S. P. QUACKENBUSH. 

Born in New York. Appointed from same State, February 15th, 1S40 
attached to sloop Boston, Bast India Squadron, 1841-4; frigate Raritan, Brazil 
Squadron, 1843-5; Naval School, 1846 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1846-7 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, July 11th, 1846 ; store-ship Supply, Mediter 
ranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; Coast Survey, 1849-50; mail-steamer Pacific, 1850-1 
mail-steamer Illinois, 1852 ; brig Perry, Coast of Africa, 1853-4; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, September 4th, 1855; Home Squadron, 1856; steam-frigate Wabash 
Home Squadron, 1857-8; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859; frigate Congress 
Brazil Squadron, 1860-1 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; com- 
manding steamer Delaware, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861- ~ 
commanded the Delaware, flying the divisional flag of Commander S. C. Rowan 
at battles of Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City and Newbern, 1862 ; at Winton 
North Carolina, in same vessel, engaged a rebel battery and a regiment of 
infantry at short range ; engagements with Sewell's Point battery ; a flying bat- 
tery at Wilcox Landing, and a battery on Malvern Hill, James river 
engagement with a battery at Point of Rocks, Appomattox river, 1862 
commanding steam gunboat Unadilla, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863; commanding steam gunboat Pequot, North Atlantic Blockading Squad 
ron, 1863-4; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; commissioned as 
Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steamer Conemaugh, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866-8; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER EARL ENGLISH. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 25th, 1840 ; 
attached to frigate Constellation, East India Squadron, 1840-4; steam-ship 



100 COMMANDERS. 

Princeton, special service, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; promoted to Passed 
MidsMpman, July 11th, 1846 ; razee Independence, flag-ship. Pacific Squadron, 
1846-8; present at capture of Mazatlan, 1847; steamer Vixen, Home Squad- 
ron, 1849-50 ; store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1851-3 ; receiving-ship, 
Philadelphia, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; sloop Levant, East India 
Squadron, 1855-8 ; took part in engagements with Barrier Forts, Canton river, 
China, November, 1856 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1859 ; steam-sloop Wyom- 
ing, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1; commanding steamer Somerset, Eastern Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; capture of fort at mouth of St. Marks Eiver, 
Florida, June 15th, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 

1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Sagamore, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 

1863 ; captured and destroyed town of New Smyrna, Florida, July 28th, 1863 ; 
, commanding steam gunboat Pontiac, 1864; commanding steamer Wyal using. 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Plymouth, North 
Carolina, October, 1864; in action with rebel batteries and infantry, on Eoan- 
oke river, near Poplar Point, North Carolina, during the expedition up that 
river, the advance being prevented by torpedoes, December, 1864 ; ordnance 
duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 
1866 J commanding steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER JOSEPH M. BRADFORD. 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed from Alabama, January 10th, 1840 ; at- 
tached to frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1840-3 ; sloop Vandalia, 
Home Squadron, 1843-5; Naval School, 1846; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, July 11th, 1846; attached to steamer Spitfire, Home Squadron, 1846-7. 

Was in the several attacks on Vera Cruz; on board the Spitfire, when that ves- 
sel, assisted by two other gunboats, captured a ten-gun fort a few miles below 
Tobasco ; in several skirmishes in and about Tobasco ; at capture of Tuspan 
and Tampico. 

Frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8 ; razee Independence, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; Coast Survey, 1853 ; sloop Dale, Coast of Africa, 
1854-5 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
16th, 1855 ; sloop Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1856 j receiving-ship, Boston, 
1857-9 ; store-ship Release, Brazil Squadron, 1860-1 ; Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, 1862-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 16th, 186^ j commanding steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863. 

In November, 1863, was appointed Fleet Captain of the South Atlantic 
Squadron, and served in that capacity until June 25th, 1865; was a number of 
times under fire at Charleston and Stono Inlet. 

Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; commanding steam-sloop Resaca, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1869. 



COMMANDER REIGART B. DOWRY. 

Born in South America, July 14th, 1826. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
January 21st, 1840; attached to sloop Boston, East India Squadron, 1840-3; 



COMMANDERS. 101 

stenmcr Princeton, special service, '1844-5; Naval School, 1846; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, July 11th, 1846; Home Squadron during Mexican war ; 
prosetit at Tampico, Tuspan, Vera Cruz, Tobaseo, Seven Palms, and Alvarado ; 
wounded slightly at Tuspan; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1850-2; sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1852-4 ; promoted to Blaster, 
1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant,. September 14th, 1855 ; steam-frigate Pow- 
hatin, East India Squadron, 1855-6 ; receiving ship, New York, 1857-8 ; sloop 
Preble, Brazil Squadron, 1858-9 ; special duty, 1860-1 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, 
Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; was present in Pawnee in first firing on Sumpter ; engage- 
ment at Acquia creek, Potomac river, 1861; commanded steamer Preeborn, in 
engagement at Matthias Point and other affairs on Potomac river; suggested 
Ilatteras expedition, and gave information which led to it, received thanks of 
the Secretary of the Navy for the same, August, 1861 ; commanded steamer 
Underwriter in Albemarle Sound, 1861 ; was Executive Officer of steam-sloop 
Brooklyn in the battles with the forts below New Orleans, and at the capture 
of the city ; first attack on Vicksburg, June 30th, 1862 ; commanded steamer 
Sciota, Western Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagement at Donaldson- 
viUe, Louisiana, between Sciota and rebel force of nine hundred men and seven 
pieces of artillery,. October 5th, 1862; engagement with batteries at Galveston, 
January, 1863 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; 
special duty, Washington, 1863-4 ; commanding apprentice-ship Sabine, 1864-8 ; 
commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 



COMMANDER WILLIAM W. LOW. 

Born in Massachusetts, April 15th, 1823. Appointed from same State, 
1841 ; attached to steamer Missouri, Home Squadron, 1842-3 ; sloop Deca- 
tur, Coast of Africa, 1843-5 ; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1845-6 ; 
Naval School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; sloop Falmouth, Pa- 
cific Squadron, 1851-2 ; steamer Princeton, special service, 1854-5 ; promoted 
to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; store- 
ship Relief, 1858-9 ; sloop St. Louis, Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; sloop Constel- 
lation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gun-boat Octorara, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5. 

Participated in bombardment of Fort Powell, Grant's Pass, Mississippi Sound, 
February, 1864 ; in the bombardment of Port Morgan, August 22d, 1864 ; in 
the operations ai^ainst the rebel works, in Blakely river, April, 1865 ; and at 
the capture of Mobile. 

Special duty, Boston, 1866-7; commissioned as Commander, July .25th, 
1866; commanding receiving-ship, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER JOHN I-I. UPSHUR. 

Born in Virginia, December 5th, 1823. Appointed from Virginia, Novem- 
ber 4th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; 



102 COMMANDERS. 

sloop St. Marys, Mediterranean Squadron, »1 843-6 ; Home Squadron, durin 
Mex-ioan war ; in tte Naval Battery, during tte bombardment of Vera Cruz 
Naval School, 1847 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 
frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50; ordnance duty, 1852 
store-ship Supply, Eiist India Squadron, 1853-6; promoted to Blaster, 1855 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855; ordnance duty, Washing- 
ton Navy Yard, 1856-7 ; sloop Cumberland, Coast of Africa, 1858-9 ; North 
Atlantic JJlockading Squadron, 1861 ; at capture of forts at Hatteras, North 
Carolina; steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861; 
present at battle of Port Royal ; commanding steamer Flambeau, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; several expeditions up the rivers of South Caro- 
lina; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
steam-frigate Minnesota, flag-ship. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863—4 ; commanding steamer A. D. Vance, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; at capture of Fort Fisher, January, 1865 ; commanding steamer 
Frolic, European Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 
1866; commanding apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS A. KOE. 

Born in New York, October 4th, 1823. Appointed from New York, Octo- 
ber 19th, 1841 ; attached to sloop John Adams, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop 
Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1844-6 ; steamer Alleghany, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1846-7; Naval School, 1847-8; promoted to Passed Midshipman 
on August 10th, 1847 ; mail-steamer Georgia, 1851-2 ; brig Porpoise, North 
Pacific Expedition, 1853-4. 

Engagement with squadron of fourteen Chinese junks, in 1854; defeated the 
squadron and broke up their rendezvous near Macao, sinking a number of junks. 

Sloop Vincennes, North Pacific Expedition, 1855; promoted to Master, 1855; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; 
sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60; Executive Officer steam- 
sloop Pensacola, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Engagement with batteries on the passage down the Potomac; attack on and 
passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Chalmette batteries, and capture 
of New Orleans. Engagement at Baton Rouge, August 5th, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding 
steam gunboat Katahdin, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

Second engagement at Baton Rouge and destruction of rebel iron-clad Arkan- 
sas, August 7th, 1862; two fights near Donaldsonville with masked batteries; 
engagement at Plaquemine, Louisiana; skirmishing constantly for over four 
months in the Katahdin between Baton Rouge and College Point, Louisiana, 
1862. 

Commanding steamer Sassacus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; battle of rebel iron-clad Albemarle and gunboat Bombshell, May 5.th, 
1864 ; commanding steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1864-6 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Madawasoa, New York, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Commander, 
July 25th, 1866; commanding steamer Tacony, Atlantic Squadron, 1867; 
Fleet-Captain, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDERS. 103 

COMMANDER JAMES S. THORNTON. 

Born ia New Hampshire, 1827. Appointed from New Hampshire, January 
15th, 1841 ; attaclied to frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1841-5 ; sloop 
John Adams, Home Squadron, 1846-7; on blockade and special duty in Gulf 
during Mexican war; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1846; 
steamer Mississippi, Home Squadron, 1847-9 ; Coast Survey, 1849-50 ; re- 
signed May 9th, 1850 ; reinstated, 1854 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 
1855; promoted to Master, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 
1855; store-ship Relief, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; brig Bainbridge, Atlantic 
Coast, 1861 ; Executive OflBcer of flag-ship Hartford at the passage of the 
forts and Chalmette batteries below New Orleans; also, two engagements with 
the Vicksburg batteries, and action with the ram Arkansas; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Winona, 
off Mobile, 1863 ; made a reconnoissanee of Fort Gaines, and sounded the ap- 
proach thereto under fire of the fort ; destroyed rebel steamer in Navy Cove, 
Mobile Bay, under fire of Fort Morgan; Executive Officer of the Kearsarge in 
the action with the Alabama ofiF Cherbourg, France. 

Lieutenant-Commander Thornton was advanced several numbers in his grade 
for his gallantry and efficiency in the action with the Alabama. 

Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-7; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM D. WHITING. 

Born in J^Iassachusetts, May 1st, 1823. Appointed from same State March 
1st, 1841 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1841-4 ; frigate Colum- 
bus, East India Squadron, 1844-6 ; Naval School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, August lOth, 1847 ; sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 1849-52 ; 
Naval Observatory, Washington, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-7 ; promoted to 
Master, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855; sloop 
Marion, Coast of Africa, 1858-60 ; sloop Macedonian, 1861 ; Executive Officer 
sloop Vandalia, at capture of Port Royal, 1861 ; commanding steamer Wyan- 
dotte, Potomac flotilla, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1832 ; commanding steam gun-boat Ottawa, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863. 

Attack and capture of lower end of Morris Island ; attacks on Fort Wagner 
and battery Gregg, and bombardment up to the time of their evacuation. 

Commanding school-ship Savannah, 1864-5 ; commanding steamer Tioga, 
Gulf Squadron, 1866 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1867-9; commanding sloop Saratoga, North Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1869. 



COMMANDER J. C. P. DbKRAFPT. 

Born in District of Columbia, January 12th, 1826. Appointed from Illinois, 
October 19th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1841-3; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1844-6; Home Squadron, 1846; 



104 COMMANDERS. 

first attack on Alvarado, 1846; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847; Naval 
School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; frigate 
Baritan, Home Squadron, 1849-50; Coast Survey, 1851; steamer Vixen, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2; Coast Survey, 1853; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1855 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned, as Lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 14th, 1855 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1856-8 ; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1859; frigate Niagara, special service, 1861; attack on 
Fort McCrean, defences of Pensacola, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 18G2-3 ; 
commanding steamer Conemaugh, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-6 ; 
attack on Fort Powell and defences of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864; com- 
missioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1867 ; 
Fleet Captain, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER OSCAR C. BADGER. 

BoEN in Connecticut. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 19th, 
1841 ; attached to razee Independence, Home Squadron, 1841-2 ; sloop Sara- 
toga, Coast of Africa, 1843^ ; was in landing party from the Saratoga, and 
took part in the destruction of the Berley villages, 1843 ; steamer Mississippi, 
Home Squadron, during Mexican war, at Alvarado, 1846 ; brig Perry, Brazil 
Squadron, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; 
sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1850-1 ; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 
1851 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1852; Naval Observatory, Washing- 
ton, 1853-4 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Septem- 
ber 14th, 1855 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1855-6 ; ordnance-ship 
Plymouth, 1858 ; sloop Blacedonian, Blediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1861; commanding steamer Anacostia, Potomac flotilla, 
1861-2; attack on Cock Pit Point Battery, January 2d, 1862; Acquia 
creek Batteries, March, 1862, and engaged in a number of other attacks 
on Potomac river batteries in the same year.; in April, 1862, while in 
command of the Anacostia, was engaged in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia, and 
defence of Gloucester Point. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
engaged in the attack on Morris Island batteries, July 11th, 18B3 ; commanded 
the iron-clad Patapsco, in the attack on Fort Wagner, July 9th, 1863 ; and in 
the attack on Ports Wagner and Gregg, August 17th, 1863 ; commanded the 
iron-clad Montauk, in the attack on Fort Sumpter ; performed the duties of 
Fleet Captain of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and was in the flag- 
ship Weehawken (iron-clad) in an attack on Fort Sumpter, on the night of Sep- 
tember 1st, 1863, and was severely wounded, his right leg being shattered by a 
metallic splinter; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864-6; commis- 
sioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steamer Peoria, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866-7; equipment duty, Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1868-9. 



COilxMANDER THOMAS C. HARRIS. 

Born ia Pennsylvania, 1823. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 
9th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop Ports- 



COMMANDERS. 105 

mouth, Home Squadron, 1843-5 ; steamer Princeton, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1849-50; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1851; frigate Rari- 
tan. Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1854-6; 
promoted to Mast«r, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; 
receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1857 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 
1857-8 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 1861 ; steamer Kearsarge, special service, 1862 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam 
gunboat Chippewa, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; several at- 
tacks on Port Wagner, Morris Island, July, 1863 ; commanding steam gunboat 
Yantic, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; in the two attacks on 
Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865; commissioned as Commander, 
July 25th, 1866; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-9. 



COMMANDER STEPHEN B. LUCE. 

Born in New York, March 25th, 1827. Appointed from New York, Octo- 
ber 19th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-5; 
serving on board frigate Columbus on Coast of California during Mexican war ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; sloop Vandalia, Pacific 
Squadron, 1850-2 ; special duty, 1853 ; steamer Visen, Home Squadron, 1854; 
Coast Survey, 1855-7 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 15th, 1855 ; sloop Jamestown, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam- 
frigate Wabash, Atlantic Coast, 1861. At battles of Hatteras Inlet and Port 
Royal ; commanded a howitzer launch of Wabash during a reeonnoissance in force 
and engagement with rebels at Port Royal ferry, by combined military and 
naval forces. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 15th, 1862; Naval Academy, 
1863 ; commanding iron-clad Nantucket, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863-5. 

While in command of the Nantucket engaged the rebel forts Sumpter and 
Moultrie a number of times; commanding steamer Pontiao, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; engaged battery Marshall several times. 

On January 5th, 1865, reported to General W. T. Sherman at Savannah, 
Ga., for duty, in connection with the army, with considerable difficulty got the 
Pontiac up the Savannah river about forty miles above the city, and protected 
the pontoon bridge from the rebel gun-boats while General Sloeum's wing 
passed into South Carolina, which service was acknowledged by General 
Sherman. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Commandant of Midshipmen 
at Naval Academy, 1866-8; commanding steamer Mohongo, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1868-9; at present, commanding steam-sloop Juniata, European 
Squadron. 



COMMANDER JOHN LEE DAVIS. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, January 9th, 1841 ; attached to 
sloop Fairfield, Mediterranean Squadron, 1842-5 ; brig Porpoise, Home Squad- 



106 COMMANDERS. 

ron, 1846-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August lOth, 1847; steamer 
Iris, Home Squadron, 1848 ; brig Dolphin, East India Squadron, 1849-50 ; 
captured a piratical junk near Macao, China, 1849 ; sloop Plymouth, Home 
Squadron, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852; brig Perry, Coast of Africa, 1853-4; 
promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855; 
Coast Survey, 1855-7 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; frigate Merri- 
mack, Pacific Squadron, 1859 ; steamer Water Witch, Western Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861 ; engagement with rebel gunboats at Southwest Pass, 
Mississippi river, October 12th, 1861 ; commanding steamer Vixen, South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Wissahickon, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; several engagements with Fort McAllister, 
Ogeechee river, Ga., and in nearly all the battles in which the gunboats were 
engaged with the rebel batteries of Morris Island, July 10th to August 22d, 
1868; commanding iron-clad Montauk. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; in nearly all the battles in which the monitors were engaged with 
Fort Sumpter and the batteries of Charleston harbor, from August 23d, 1863, 
to May 15th, 1864; commanding steam gunboat Sassacus, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; participated in the two attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; engagement with Port Anderson, Cape 
Fear river, February, 1865 ; engagement with Fort Strong, Cape Fear river, 
February 20th and 21st, 1865 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866; commissioned 
as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867 ; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1868-9. 



C0M3IANDEII ALEXANDER A. SEMMES. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Maryland, October 22d, 
1841 ; attached to frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; skir- 
mish with the natives at Grand Bevely, Africa; sloop Vincennes, East India 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; Naval School, 1847 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
August 10th, 1847; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1849-50; frigate Con- 
gress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-2 ; Coast Survey, 1853 ; Naval Observatory, 
Washington, 1854 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 15th, 1855; steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7. 

In November, 1856, commanded a force of twenty-three sailors and marines 
in a successful attack upon an encampment of one hundred E-ussian-American 
Indians, in Puget Sound. 

Steam-sloop Powhatan, Bast India Squadron, 1859-60; steamer Ehode 
Island, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; commanding steamer Wamsutta, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engaged in skirmish with rebels at an island in 
Newport river, Ga., April, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Tahoma, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4. 

Attacked the batteries of Tampa, Florida, April, 1863, and in October, 1863, 
attacked same batteries as a ruse while di.=patching a party of sailors to capture 
some blockade-runners ; in September, 1863, while in command of a lio-ht 
draught steamer, with detachment from various vessels of the East Gulf Squad- 
ron, made a demonstration on Bay Port, Florida, which resulted in the destruc- 
tion of an English blockade-running steamer and the warehouse containing her 



COMMANDERS. 107 

Commanding iron-clad Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1S64-5 ; 
bombardment of Fort Pringle, July 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th, 186 4- ; picket duty 
in the harbor of Charleston during the fall and winter of 1864-5. 

In February, 1865, commanding the Lehigh, and senior officer of six vessels 
operating against the rebel defences on James Island ; fall of Charleston, 1865. 

Commanded the Lehigh in a midnight bombardment of the Howlett House 
batteries on James river ; fall of Richmond. 

Ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Commander, July 
25th, 1866 ; commanding sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM T. TRUXTON. 

Born in Pennsylvania, March 11th, 1824. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
February 9th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1842-4 
brig Truxton, Coast of Africa, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 
brig Dolphin, special service, 1853; special duty, 1854; promoted to Master, 
1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 
1855-7 ; brig Perry, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; sloop Dale, 1861 ; command- 
ing sloop Dale, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gun-boat Cho- 
cura, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam gun-boat 
Tacony, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; capture of Plymouth, 
North Carolina, October, 1864; two attacks on Fort Fisher, N. C, December, 
1864, and January, 1865 ; various engagements with batteries along the coast 
of North Carolina ; special duty. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-7 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; commanding sloop Jamestown, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM K. MAYO. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, October 18th, 1841 ; attached 
to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1842-4 ; steamer Blichigan, on the 
lakes, 1846; Home Squadron, during the Mexican war. 

Took part in attempt to cut out three schooner gun-boats in Tampico river; 
served in naval battery at Vera Cruz ; bombardment of forts at mouth of 
Tampico river. 

Naval School, 1847-8; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; brig Dolphin, special 
service. 1851-2 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Home Squadron, 1853 ; sloop Cyane, 
Home Squadron, 1854 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant, September 15th, 1855 ; Naval Academy, 1855-7 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, 
East India Squadron, 1858-9 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; 
steam-sloop Housatonic, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat 
Kanawha, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; engagement with 
Fort Morgan, October 12th, 1863; engagement at Mobile Point with field bat- 



108 COMMANDERS. 



terles and riflemen, 1863 ; commanding irnn-clad Nahant, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Moultrie, 1864 ; commissioned 
as Commander, July 25th, 1866; navigation duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 1866-9. 



COMMANDEB, JAMES B. JOUETT. 

EoEN in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, September 10th, 1841 ; at- 
tached to razee Independence, 1841-3 ; sloop Decatur, Coast of Africa, 1841-5 ; 
steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1846-7 ; held Point Isabel with sailors 
from tbe squadron ; Naval School, 1847 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
August 10th, 1847; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50; 
store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1851-2 ; mail-steamer Illinois, 1853 ; 
sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1857 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1858; steamer N. W. Chapin, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 
1858-9 ; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1860 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1861 ; frigate Santee, Western G-ulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

On November 7th, 1861, Lieutenant Jouett commanded a detachment of 
sailors and marines from the Santee, who boarded and destroyed the rebel armed 
schooner Boy al Yacht, in Gralveston Bay. Lieutenant Jouett had a desperate 
hand-to-hand conflict with the commander of the rebel vessel, and received two 
severe wounds in the right arm, and right side and lung, from a pike in the 
hands of one of the crew of the schooner who came to the assistance of his com- 
mander. Lieutenant Jouett received the commendation of his commanding 
ofBoer and the thanks of the Department for this achievement. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; steamer Michi- 
gan, on the Likes, 1862 ; commanding; steamer B. R. Cuyler, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Metacomet, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863^; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864. 

Soon after the fleet had passed the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay, Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Jouett was ordered to pursue the three rebel gun boats who 
were annoying the fleet by a raking fire. They steamed up the bay, closely 
pursued by the Metacomet, and engaged that vessel with their stern guns, of 
which they had three each. The Gaines retreated under cover of the fort in a 
crippled condition, the Morgan hauled off to starboard, and the Selma struck her 
flag to the Metacomet, and was taken possession of by an officer detailed for that 
purpose by Lieutenant-Commander Jouett. 

Rear-Admiral Farragut, in his official report of the battle of Mobile Bay, 
says : " Lieutenant-Commander Jouett's conduct during the whole afikir com- 
mands my warmest commendation." 

Naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, July 
25th, 1866; Navy Yard, New York, 1867-8; commanding steamer Michigan, 
on the lakes, 1868-9. 



COBIMANDER T. SCOTT PILLEBROWN. 

BOES in District of Columbia, August 13th, 1824. Appointed from Maine, 
October 19th, 1841; attached to frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 



COMMANDERS. 109 

1842-5; sloop St. Louis, Home Squadron, 1846-7; was presenh in all the 
operatioDS on the Gulf Coast during the Mexican war; Naval School, 1847; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; sloop St. Louis, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1851; 
store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1851-2 ; sloop Vincennes, North 
Pacific Expedition, 1852-6 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, September 15th, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1857-8 ; 
steamer N. P. Chapin, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; 
commanding steamer Anacostia, special service, 1859-60 ; steamer Crusader, 
Home Squadron, 1860; steam-frigate Roanoke, Atlantic Coast, 1861; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; Navy Yard, New York, 
1862-3; commanding steam gunboat Chenango, 1863; commanding iron- 
clad Passaic operating against Fort Sumpter during May, 1864; commanding 
iron-clad Montauk, operating against battery Pringle in the Stono river, S. 
C., during July, 1864 ; commanding steamer Sonoma, South Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1864-5 ; engagement with rebel batteries on the Tagoda river, 
February, 1865; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1866; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; Hydrographical OflSce, Washington, 1867-8; com- 
manding steam-sloop Narragansett, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869 ; at present 
on special duty, Washington, D. C. 



C0M3IANDER EDWARD E. STONE. 

BoEN in G-eorgia, January 26th, 1826. Appointed from Greorgia, October 
19th, 1841; attached to frigate Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 1842-4; brig 
Perry, East India Squadron, 1854-5; frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 
during Mexican war; attack on Vera Cruz; Naval School, 1847-8; promoted 
to passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; brig Perry, Coast of Africa, 
1848-50 ; sloop Portsmouth, Coast of Africa, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852 ; 
store-ship Predonia, Pacific Squadron, 1853; Coast Survey, 1854-6; promoted 
to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; barque 
Resolute, special service, 1857 ; sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1858 ; sloop 
John Adams, East India Squadron, 1860-1 ; commanding school-ship Macedo- 
nian, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; com- 
manding steamer Iron- Age, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Engagement with and capture of Fort Anderson ; slightly wounded at Fort 
Anderson. 

Commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; special duty. New Orleans, 
1866-7; commanding steamer Shawmut, Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; Light- 
house Inspector, 1869. 



COMMANDER WALTER W. QUEEN. 

Born in District of Columbia, October 6th, 1824. Appointed from New 
York, October 7th, 1841 ; attached to sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 
1841-3; brig Perry, East India Squadron, 1843-5 ; frigate Cumberland, Home 
Squadron, during Mexican war. 



110 COMMANDERS. 

Stationed at Point Isabella during battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, 
May 8th and 9th, 1846 ; attacks on Alvarado, Tampico, Tuspan and Vera Cruz. 

Frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847 ; Naval School, 1847; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; resigned, 1847, and re-entered the ser- 
vice in 1854 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Septem- 
ber 16th, 1855 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron 1855; steamer Michigan, 
on the lakes, 1856 ; East India Squadron, 1857-8 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
1859-60 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, special service, 1861. 

Attached to Powhatan during the reinforcement of Fort Pickens, Florida, 
1861, and served nineteen days on shore at the fort, in charge of the boats of 
the fleet. 

Commanded second division (seven schooners) of the Mortar flotilla, under 
Commander Porter, during the bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
and during the attack on Vicksburg, when Flag-Oificer Farragut passed the 
batteries with his fleet. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty, 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1862-3 ; commanding steam gunboat Wyalusing, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^. 

Commanded the Wyalusing in the engagement with rebel ram Albemarle and 
her consorts, the Bombshell and Cotton-Plant, May 5 th, 1864, when the ram, to 
prevent capture, sought refuge in the Roanoke river. 

Ordnance duty, Reading, Pa., 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, July 
25th, 1866; special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867; commanding steani- 
, sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER RALPH CHANDLER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27th, 1845 ; 
Naval School, 1846; attached to razee Independence, flag-ship, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1846-8 ; engaged in two skirmishes near Mazatlan, during Mexican war ; 
sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
October 6th, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1852 ; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1853-5; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 16th, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856-7 ; Survey of the Parana, &c., 1858-9 ; 
sloop Vandalia, 1861 ; battle of Port Royal, 1831 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; engagement with Sewell's Point 
battery, and capture of Norfolk, 1862 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Huntsville, Bast Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; commanding steam gunboat Maumee, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment and capture of Fort Fisher, and capture of 
Wilmington, North Carolina; commanding steamer Don, special service, 
1866-8; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; ordnance duty, New 
York Navy Yard, 1868 ; commanding steamer Talapoosa, special service, 1869. 



COMMANDER K. RANDOLPH BREESB. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Rhode Island, November 6th, 1846 • 
attached to sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1846-8; frigate Brandywine' 



COMMANDERS. Ill 

Brazil Squadron, 1849-50 ; Naval Academy, 1852 ; promoted to Passed Blid- 
shipman, June 8th, 1852; sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 1852-4; 
steam-sloop Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1854-5-; promoted to Master, 
1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 
1856-S ; sloop Preble, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; 
sloop Portsmouth, 1861; commanded third division of Mortar flotilla at 
bombardment of forts Jackson and St. Philip; commanding second division 
in operations before Vicksburg in summer of 1862; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanded flag-ship Black Hawk, Missis- 
sippi Squadron at Arkansas Post, 1862, and at siege of Vicksburg, 1863 ; 
in charge of mortars a short time during the siege ; commanded naval forces at 
the feigned attacks on Haines' Blufia, in co-operation with General Sherman, 
1863 ; Eed river expedition, 1864 ; Fleet Captain of North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron in both attacks on Fort Fisher ; commanded the naval forces in the 
assault on Fort Fisher, and present at the subsequent operations on Cape Fear 
river. 

Jjieutenant-Commander Breese was associated with Admiral Porter during 
the entire war, and repeatedly received the thanks of his commanding officer for 
efficiency and zeal in the discharge of his important and responsible duties. 
Upon one occasion, General Sherman, in an official report, warmly commended 
Lieutenant-Commander Breese for his hearty and effective co-operation in the 
combined attack upon Haines' Bluff, Mississippi river. 

Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
special duty, Hartford, Connecticut, 1867; ordnance duty, Washington, 
1858-9 ; at present, under orders to Pacific Squadron. 



COMMANDER LEWIS A. KIMBERLY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Illinois, December 8th, 1846 ; sloop 
Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1847-50; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 
1851-2; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8th, 1852; sloop Dale, 
Coast of Africa, 1852-6 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1857 ; sloop 
Germantown, Bast India Squadron, 1858-00 ; frigate Potomac, store-ship. 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship, Farragut's 
Squadron, 1862-4; engagement and passage of Port Hudson batteries; engage- 
ment with batteries at Grand Gulf and Warrington, Mississippi river; battle of 
Mobile Bay; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-6; 
commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; commanding receiving-ship, 
New York, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER GEORGE U. MORRIS. 

BoEN in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, August 14th, 1846 ; 
attached to sloop Albany, Home Squadron, during Mexican war; stationed in 
Naval battery at Vera Cruz ; present at Tuspan and Tobasco ; razee Independ- 
ence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 



112 COMMANDEES. 

June 8th, 1852 ; brig Dolphin, special service, 1853 ; sloop Decatur, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-7 ; Indian battle, at Seattle, Washington Territory, 1856 ; sloop 
Cy^ne, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60 ; sloop Cumberland, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2. 

On the 8th of March, 1862, the rebel iron-clad ram Merrimack came down 
the Elizabeth river, accompanied by several smaller steamers, two of them par- 
tially armored, to attack the vessels of the blockading squadron that were in and 
about Hampton Roads. When the Merrimac and her attendants made their 
appearance, the Congress and the Cumberland, two sailing vessels, were 
anchored off Newport News, and the remaining vessels were in the vicinity of 
Fortress Monroe, some six miles distant. Captain Radford, the commanding 
officer of the Cumberland, being absent on duty, Lieutenant Morris, the Execu- 
tive Officer, was temporarily in command of the vessel. 

The Congress, being nearest to the Merrimack, was the first to receive her 
fire, which was promptly returned by a full broadside, the shots falling appar- 
ently harmlessly off from the armored side of the assailant. Passing by the 
Congress, the Blerrimac dashed upon the Cumberland, and was received by her 
with a heavy, well-directed and vigorous fire, which, like that of the Congress, 
produced, unfortunately, but little effect. A contest so unequal could not be of 
long continuance, and it was closed when the Merrimack, availing herself of her 
power as a steam-ram, ran furiously against the Cumberland, laying open her 
wooden hull, and causing her almost immediately to sink. As her guns 
approached the water's edge, her young Commander, Lieutenant Morris, and 
the gallant crew, stood firm at their posts, delivered a parting fire, and the good 
ship went down heroically with her colors flying. Many of the officers and 
crew were enabled to reach the shore, which was close at hand, but a large num- 
ber perished with the ship. 

Commanding steam gunboat Port Royal, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862 j engagement with nine-gun battery on James river. May 
8th, 1862 ; fort Darfing, May 15th, 1862 ; wounded in the leg by 
miunie ball, at Fort Darling; Malvern Hill, August 8th, 1862 j com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam 
gunboat Port Royal, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; engage- 
ment with Fort Powell, at Grant's Pass, February, 1864; commanding 
steam gunboat Shawmut, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; steam- 
sloop Broklyn, South Atlantic Squadron, 18G6; commissioned as Commander, 
July 25th, 1866. 



COMMANDER BANCROFT GHERARDI. 

Born in Louisiana, November 10th, 1832. Appointed from Massachusetts, 
June 29th, 1846 ; attached to frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1846-50; steam- 
sloop Saranao, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; Naval Academy, 1852 ; promoted to 
Passed^ Midshipman, June 8th, 1852; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean Squadron, 
185-3-5 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
16th, 1855 ; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; rendezvous, Boston, 
1859; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1861-2; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862; engagement with Fort Maeon, 1862 ; steam-sloop Mohican, special ser- 
vice, 1863 ; commanding steam gunboat Chocura, Western Gulf Blockading 



COMMANDERS. 113 

Squadron, 1863-4; commanding steamer Port Royal, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; commanding steamer 
Pequot, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1866-7 ; navigation duty. 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



COMBIANDER DANIEL L. BRAINE.- 

Born in New York, May 19th, 1829. Appointed from Texas, May 30th, 
1846 ; Home Squadron during Mexican war ; at Alvarado, Tobasco, Tuspan, 
Laguna, Tampico, and Vera Cruz ; sloop John Adams, Home Squadron, 1848 ; 
sloop St. Marys, East India Squadron, 1849-50 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Home 
Squadron, 1850-1; Naval Academy, 1852; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 8th, 1852 ; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; promoted 
to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1858 ; Coast 
Survey, 1856-7; sloop Vincennes, Coast of Africa, 1858-60; commanding 
steamer Monticello, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engage- 
ment with rebel battery of five guns at Sewell's Point, Va., May 19th, 1862 ; 
attack and capture efforts Hatteras and Clarke, October 5th,.186L 

Engaged the enemy at Kimmekerk woods, above Cape Hatteras, exchanged 
shots with their gunboats, and dispersed with effect two regiments of infantry, 
sinking two barges and rescuing the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, who were 
surrounded by rebels. On November, 1861, engaged and silenced a two-gun 
battery at Federal Point, N. C, and dismounted one of the guns. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 15th, 1862 ; in 1862^, 
numerous engagements with forts Caswell and Fisher ; while on blockading duty 
in command of Monticello, Vicksburg, and Pequot ; commanded the Pequot in 
the attacks upon Fort Fisher, and also in the attacks upon Fort Anderson, and 
three forts on Cape Fear river, as the fleet advanced up that river to Wilming- 
ton, N. C. ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866—7 ; commissioned as 
Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; equipment duty. Navy- Yard, New York, 1869. 



COMMANDER GEORGE E. BELKNAP. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from same State, October 7th, 1847 ; 
attached to brig Porpoise, Coast of Africa, 1847-50 ; frigate Raritan, Pacific 
Squadron, 1851-3 ; Naval Academy, 1853 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 10th, 1853 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 16th, 1855; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 1854-5 ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1856; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 1856-8; commanded a 
launch at the capture of the Barrier Forts, Canton river, China, November, 
1856; sloop St. Louis, Home Squadron, 1859-61 ; commanded the boats of the 
St. Louis at reinforcement of Port Pickens, April, 1861 ; gunboat Huron, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; expedition against Fernandina, St. 
Johns, St. Augustine, &c. ; iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 j several engagements with defences of Charles- 



114 COMMANDEKS. 



ton harbor ; commanded steam gunboat Seneca, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; commanded iron-clad Canonicus ia action with the Hewlett 
House battery ,,Peoember 6th, 1864, and at Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and 
January, 1865 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-7 ; commis- 
sioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 j commanding steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1868 ; navigation duty, Navy Yard, Boston, 1869. 



COMMANDER EDWARD P. WILLIAMS. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 9th, 1847 ; attached to 
sloop St. Marys, East India Squadron, 1847-50 ; sloop Plymouth, 1851 ; 
steam-sloop Saranac, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; Naval Academy, 1853 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1853 ; sloop Dale, Coast of Africa, 
1854-5; promoted to Blaster, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
16th, 1855 ; sloop Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1856-7 ; reoeiving-ship, Boston, 
1858; brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-60; 
steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 18G2 ; steam gunboat Paul Jones, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; engagement at St. Johns Bluff; expedition up St. Johns river as far 
as lake Enterprise, and capture of steamer Governor Morton; engagement with 
batteries on Morris Island, and with the rebel ram Chicora, while drawing the 
enemy from the wreck of the Keokuk ; night assault on Fort Sumpter ; cap- 
tured, and one year a prisoner ; ordnance duty, Boston, 1864-5 ; naval rendez- 
vous, Boston, 1866; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; ordnance 
duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1867; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Boston, 
1868-9 ; commanding steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDER DAVID B. HARMONY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, April 7th, 1847; at- 
tached to frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1847 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific 
Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop Warren, Pacific Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Falmouth, 
Pacific Squadron, 1851-2 ; Naval Academy, 1853 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 10th, 1853; store-ship Relief, 1854; promoted to Master, 1855; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 
1856-7 ; sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; bombardment and passage of 
forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; 
capture of Grand Gulf; both engagements with batteries at Vicksburg ; en- 
gagement with rebel ram Arkansas ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Comnjander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; iron-clad Nahant, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; attack on defences of Charleston, April 7th, 1863 ; capture of rebel 
ram Atlanta, June 17th, 1863 ; bombardment of Morris Island batteries, from 
July 10th to August 1st, 1863; commanding steam gunboat Tahoma, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steam gunboat Sebego, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Mobile ; Navy Yard, New 



COMMANDERS. 115 

York, 1866-7; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; commanding 
steiimer Frolic, European Squadron, 1867-9 ; Inspector of Supplies, Navy 
Yard, New York, 1869. 



COMMANDER JOHN IRWIN. 

Born in Pennsylvania, April 15th, 1832. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
September 9tli, 1847 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop John Adams, 
Coast of Africa, 1851-3 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1853 ; 
steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1854-6 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8; sloop 
Savannah, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; steam-fripate Wabash, flag-ship South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; capture efforts at Hatteras Inlet; cap- 
ture of forts Walker and Beauregard ; in charge of boat howitzers ashore at 
battle of Port Royal Ferry, January 1st, 1862; bombardment and capture of 
Fort Pulaski ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ord- 
nance duty, Philadelphia, 1864; Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1866-7; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 
1866; commanding steamer Newborn, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868; com- 
manding steamer Gettysburg, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER JAMES A. GREER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, January 10th, 1848; Naval Academy, 
1849; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2; frigate Columbia, Home 
Squadron, 1852-8; Naval Academy, 18.54; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 15th, 1854; razee Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7; promoted to 
Master, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855; Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, 1858 ; steamer Southern Star, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedi- 
tion, 1858-9; steamer Sumpter, Coast of Africa, 1860-1; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; sloop St. Louis, special service, 1862-3 ; Mis- 
sissippi Squadron, 1863-4; commanded iron-clad Benton, and a division of 
Admiral Porter's Squadron ; passage of Vicksburg, April, 1863 ; engagement at 
Grand Gulf, April 29th, 1863; bombardment of Vicksburg batteries during the 
siege of forty-five days ; frequently engaged with guerillas ; Naval Academy, 
1865-6; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding steamer 
Mohongn, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding steam-sloop Tusea- 
rora. North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1869 ; at 
present, on duty at Naval Academy. 



COMMANDER ELIAS K. OWEN. 

Born in Illinois, November 21st, 1864. Appointed from Illinois, December 
7th, 1848; Naval Academy, 1849; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squad- 



116 COMMANDERS. 

roa, 1849-52 ; sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1852—4 ; promoted to Passed 
MidsMpmaQ, June 15th, 1854; promoted to Master, 1855; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, September 16th^l855; Coast Survey, 1855-7; sloop Jamestown, 
Home Squadron, 1858-60; sloop Saratoga, 1861; steamer James Adger, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; battle of Fort Royal, November 
7th, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; Missis- 
sippi Squadron, 1862-4 ; commanded iron-clad Louisville, and a division of Ad- 
miral Porter's Squadron. 

Engagements at Haines' Bluff, December, 1862, and Arkansas Post, January, 
1863; Deer Creek Expedition, March, 1863 ; passage of Vicksburg batteries, 
April 11th and 14th, 1863; Grand Gulf, April 29th, 1863; Yazoo River Ex- 
pedition, Liverpool Hights, February, 1864 ; Red River Expedition, March 
and April, 1864 ; action off Columbia, La., June, 1861. 

Receiving-ship, New York, 1865; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 
1866; special duty. Mound City, Illinois, 1866-8; commanding steam-sloop 
Seminole, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER AARON W. WEAVER. 

Born in District of Columbia, July 1st, 1832. Appointed from Ohio, May 
10th, 1848; attached to sloop St. Louis, Brazil Squadron, 1849-51; frigate 
Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854 ; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1854; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 
1854-5 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
16th, 1855; Coast Survey, 1857; sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1857-9; 
steam-sloop Susquehanna, Blockading Squadron, 1860-2; capture of forts 
Hatteras and Clarke, Port Royal; engagement at Sewell's Point, Virginia, May, 
1862; commissiooed as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commandin"' 
steam gunboat Winona,Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; engagement 
with rebel batteries, near Port Hudson, December 14th, 1862 ; engagement with 
rebel forces, at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, when they attacked Fort Butler and 
were repulsed ; commanding steam gunboat Chippewa, North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1864 ; commanding iron-clad Mahopac, at the two attacks on 
Fort Fisher, December, 1864 and January, 1865; Navy Yard, Boston, 1866; 
commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; commanding steamer Talapoosa, 
Gulf Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding rendezvous, Washington, 1868 ; Inspec- 
tor of Supplies, Navy Yard, Washington, 1869. 



COMMANDER JAMES H. GILLIS. 

Born in Pennsylvania, May 14th, 1831. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
October 12th, 1848 ; attached to frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 1849-50 • 
sloop Dale, Coast of Africa, 1851-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 15tb, 1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 
185'4-5 ; promoted to Master, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
17th, 1855; Coast Survey, 1856-7; store-ship Supply, Brazil Squadron 
1857-9; steamer Water ;Witch, Home Squadron, 1860; frigate St. Lawrence 



COMMANDEES. 117 

Atlantic Coast, 1861; sinking of rebel privateer Petrel, July, 1861; steam- 
frigate Susquehanna, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Com. 
Morris, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagement with, and 
capture of, rebel battery at junction of Dawho and South Edisto rivers, S. C, 
April, 1862; battle of Jamestown Island, S. C, June, 1862; commanding 
steamer Com. Morris, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; engage- 
ment with rebel battery at Taylor's Landing, Pamunkey river, April 16th, 
1863; commanding iron-clad Milwaukee, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; engagement with Spanish Fort, Mobile Bay, March 28th, 1865, at 
which time the Milwaukee was sunk by a rebel torpedo ; commanded naval 
battery on shore, at the siege of Spanish Fort, after the sinking of the Milwau- 
kee, until the fall of that work; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
commanding steamer Wateree, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; equipment 
duty, Washington, 1869. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM B. FITZHUGH. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, November 20th, 1848 ; attached to 
frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; sloop Cyane, Home 
Squadron, 1852-3 ; Naval Academy, 1854 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 15th, 1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1854-5; promoted to 
Master, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 17th, 1855; sloop St. 
Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1856-7; sloop Vincennes, Coast of Africa, 1858-60; 
steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadi-on, 1861-2; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1862-3 ; Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; was present 
at engagement with Fort Morgan, August, 1864 ; commanding steamer Ouachita, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5; received the surrender of rebel naval forces on 
Red river ; commanding steamer Paul Jones, Gulf Squadron, 1866-7 ; com- 
manding receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER CHARLES H. CUSHMAN. 

Born in Maine, December 6th, 1831. Appointed from Maine, March 24th, 
1849; attached to sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1849-52; frigate Consti- 
tution, Coast of Africa, 1853-4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1853; pro- 
moted to Master, September 16tb, 1855; Coast Survey, 1856 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, February 8th, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1857-8 ; steamer Western- 
port, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; steamer Water 
Witch, Home Squadron, 1860 ; steamer Massachusetts, Western Gulf Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1861. 

Engagements with rebel steamers and forts at Ship Island, Louisiana, July 
and August, 1861. 

Steam gunboat Pembina, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; 
battle of Port Royal, November 7th, 1861 ; iron-clad Montauk, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 



118 COMMANDERS. 

Attack on defences of Charleston, April 7tli, 1863 ; bombardment of forts 
and batteries in Charleston harbor, from July 10th to July 28th, 1863. 

Iron-clad Onondaga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; on picket 
duty, James river. May 5th to October 28th, 1864. 

Attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865. Lieutenant- 
Commander Cushman was in the land assault on Fort Fisher, and was wounded. 

Commanding steamer Mahaska, Gulf Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as 
Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9 ; Bureau of 
Equipment, Navy Department, 1869. 



COMMANDEE HENRY A. ADAMS, Je. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 16th, 1849j 
Naval Academy, 1849; steam frigate Susquehanna, Eastlndia Squadron, 1851-2; 
sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1852—4 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
1854; promoted to Master, September 16th, 1855; sloop Levant, Bast India 
Squadron, 1856-8 ; engagement with the Barrier Forts, Canton river, China, 
1856; commissioned as Lieutenant, May 11th, 1856; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2; passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip; Chalmette bat- 
teries and capture of New Orleans and Vicksburg, July 15th, 1862 ; steam 
gunboat Sciota, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1863 ; 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Fort Anderson and the defences of Cape 
Fear river, January and February, 1805 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866-8 ; 
commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; commanding store-ship Guard, 
European Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER GEORGE BROWN. 

Born in Indiana, June 19th, 1835. Appointed from Indiana, February 5th, 
1849 ; attached to frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, 1854; promoted to Master, September 17th, 1855; Naval School, 1856; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, June 2d, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 
1856-9 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, special service, 1861 ; Mortar flotilla, 1862 ; 
Vicksburg, June 28th, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1862; commanding iron-clad steamer Indianola, Mississippi Squadron, 

Passage of Vicksburg and Warrentown, February 14th, 1863 ; action be- 
tween Indianola and rebel rams William H. Webb and Queen of the West, and 
cotton-clad steamers Dr. Batey and Grand Era, at Upper Palmyra Island, Mis- 
sissippi river, February 24th, 1863 ; the engagement lasted one hour and twenty- 
seven minutes, and resulted in the surrender of the Indianola, to a force of four 
vessels manned by over one thousand men. The loss on the Indianola was one 
killed, one wounded (Lieutenant-Commander Brown,) severely, and seven miss- 



COMMANDERS 119 



ing, while the enemy lost two officers and twenty-three men killed, and many 
wounded. Lieutenant-Commander Brown and his officers and crew were taken 
prisoners, but were exchanged at Richmond a few months later in the war. 

Commanding steam gunboat Itasca, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5. 

Battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; naval operations in Mobile Bay, 
against Spanish Port and defences of city of Mobile, from March 23d to April 
14th, 1S65; Navy Yard, Washington, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Commander, 
July 25th, 1866. 



COMMANDER JAMES W. SHIRK. 

Born in Pennsylvania, July 16th, 1832. Appointed from the same State, 
March 26th, 1849; attached to sloop John Adams, Coast of Africa, 1849-51; 
steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1851—4 ; sloop Plymouth, 
Atlantic Coast, 1858 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 1854 ; promoted to Mas- 
ter, September 16th, 1855; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1856-8; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, November 6th, 1856 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1859; sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60; Mississippi Squadron, 1861 ; 
commanding steam gunboat Lexington, at battle of Fort Henry, February 6th, 
1862 ; Pittsburg Landing, March 1st, 1862; engagement with rebel batteries at 
Eastport, Miss., March 11th, and Chickasaw, Alabama, March 23d, 1862 ; 
battle of Shiloh, April 6th and 7th, 1862; St. Charles, White river. June 17th, 
1862; Haines' Blutf, December 27th, 1862; Chickasaw Bayou, December 28th, 
1862, to January 1st, 1863, inclusive ; Arkansas Post, January lOtli, 1863; 
passage of Vicksburg batteries, April 16th, 1863 ; Grand Gulf, April 29th, 
1863 ; attack on Vicksburg, May 22d, 1863 ; almost constantly under fire of 
the batteries at Vicksburg, from May 19th to June 4th, 1863 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862, and commanding iron-clad Tus- 
cumbia and a division of the Mississippi Squadron, 1863—4; Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam- 
frigate Franklin, European Squadron, 1867-8; special duty, Navy Department, 
1869. 



COMMANDER JOHN G. WALKER. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from Iowa, October 5th, 1850 ; Naval 
Academy, 1851 ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Na- 
val Academy, 1856 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856 ; sloop 
Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1856-7 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 
1858-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, January 23d, 1858-9 ; steamer Connec- 
ticut, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; steam gunboat Winona, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862 ; passage of forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, 
and capture of New Orleans ; operations against Vicksburg, in summer of 1862, 
including the passage of the batteries both ways ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding iron-clad steamer Baron De Kalb, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; operations against Vicksburg, winter of 1862-3 ; 
two attacks on Haines' Blufi'; engagement at Arkansas Post; Yazoo Pass expe- 



120 



COMMANDERS. 



ditionj with the attack on Fort Pemberton; capture of yazoo City, and expedi- 
tion up Yazoo river to destroy steamers, having three sharp fights ; commanded 
naval battery in 15th army corps at siege of Vicksburg ; commanding steam gun- 
boat Saco, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Wilming- 
ton, N. C, and forts, with the exception of Fort Fisher; commanding steamer 
Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 
1866 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9 ; commanding frigate Sabine, special service, 
1869. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS M. RAMSAY. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 5th, 
1850 ; Naval Academy, 1850-1 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific 
Squadron, 1852-5; Naval Academy, 1856; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
January 20th, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1857 ; steam-frigate 
Merrimac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-60 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, January 
23d, 1858 ; sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1860-2 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 16tb, 1862; commanding iron-clad Choctaw and a 
division of the Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4; engagements at Haines' Blufij 
April 30th and May 1st, 1863 ; Milliken's Bend, June, 1863 ; Vicksburg, June 
and July, 1863 ; Liverpool Landing, Trinity, La., March 1st, 1864 ; Red River 
Expedition, March, April, and May, 1864 ; Fort De Russy, La., May, 1864; 
several engagements with guerillas and field-batteries, on the Mississippi river; 
commanding steam gunboat Unadilla, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher ; engagements on Cape Fear river, from 
the time of the capture of Fort Fisher to the capture of Wilmington, N. C; 
Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; 
navigation duty. Navy Yard, Washington, 1867 ; Fleet Captain, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1867—8 ; commanding steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER RICHARD L. LAW. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, February 17th, 1841 ; attached 
to frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; brig Lawrence, Home Squadron, 
1843-5; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; brig Perry, 
Brazil Squadron, 1847—8; frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1849-50; 
Coast Survey, 1851-5; commissioned as- Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855: 
sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-7 ; Naval Academy, 1858-9 • 
steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship East India Squadron, 1859-61 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Clifton 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; three engagements at Galveston, 
Texas, one at Laracca, Texas; commanding store-ship New Hampshire, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865-6; commissioned as Commander, Sep- 
tember 26th, 1866 ; commanding receiving-ship New Hampshire, Norfolk 
1866-7 ; commanding steam gunboat Taoony, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ' 
commanding steamer Suwanee, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; commanding 
steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; commanding steam-sloop Iro- 
quois, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDERS. 121 

COMMANDER SAMUEL R. FRANKLIN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 18tb, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 18il-3; store-ship Relief, 
Pacific Squadron, 1845-7; present at the demonstration upon Monterey, the 
enemy offering no resistance, and the place being occupied without a battle; 
Naval School, 1847; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; 
razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; Coast Survey, 1853-5 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855; Naval Academy, 1855-6; 
sloop Falmouth, Brazil'Squadron, 1857-9 ; sloop Macedonian, Home Squadron, 
1859-60 ; steam-sloop Daootah, Atlantic Coast, 1861-2 ; was a volunteer on board 
of the Roanoke in the action with the Merrimac, March, 1862, in which the 
Congress and Cumberland were destroyed. The Roanoke was engaged with the 
forts at Sewell's Point, but grounded, and did not get fairly into the action. 
Executive Officer of the Dacotah in the attack upon the batteries at Sewell's 
Point in the spring of 1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1862 ; commanding the steam gunboat Aroostook, James river flotilla, 
1862 ; commanding Aroostook, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
special duty. New Orleans, 1864 ; on the staff of Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher 
during the operations in Mobile Bay in the spring of 1865, and was the naval 
representative in the demand for the surrender of the city of Mobile ; command- 
ing steamer Saginaw, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, September 26th, 1866; ordnance duty. Mare Island, Cal., 1868-9 ; 
commanding steam-sloop Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDER EDWARD Y. McCAULEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania, November 2d, 1827. Appointed from Pennsyl- 
vania, September 9th, 1841 ; attached to Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; 
sloop Savannah, Pacific Squadron, 1844-5 ; frigate United States, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1846-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 
1847 ; frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; razee Inde- 
pendence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India 
Squadron, 1853-6; present at the attack on pirates, China Seas, 1855; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 
1857 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1858-9 ; resigned, August 19th, 1859 ; 
re-entered the service as an Acting Lieutenant, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, United States Navy, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Fort Henry, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; boat attack on Bayport, 
Florida, and two skirmishes ; commanding steam gunboat Tioga, East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 186-3-4; Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1866-7; commissioned as Commander, September 27th, 1866; 
Fleet Captain, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER JONATHAN YOUNG. 

BoEN in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, October 19th, 1841 ; attached to 
sloop Vincennes, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Columbus, East India 



122 COMMANDERS. 

Squadron, 1845-8; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; 
frigate Raritan Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 
1851-2; Naval Observatory, "Washington, 1854 ; steamer Massachusetts, Pacific 
Squadron, 1855-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; Naval 
Observatory, Washington, 1858 ; steamer Westernport, Brazil Squadron and 
Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 ; at Hatteras Inlet and Port Royal; steam-frigate Powhatan, South At^ 
lantio Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Pembina, Western Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863 ; engagement off Mobile, April, 1863 ; ordnance duty, 
New York Navy Yard, 1864 ; commanding steamer Cimarron, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; in all engagements with defences of Charleston 
harbor, from July, 1864, to February, 1865 ; comrnanding receiving-ship Van- 
dalia, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7 ; commissioned as Commander, November 
21st, 1866; commanding steamer Mahaska, Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; Naval 
Observatory^ Washington, 1869. 



COMMANDER EDWARD C. GRAFTON. 

BoEN in Massachusetts. Appointed from same State, October 5th, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Columbus, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop Ports- 
mouth, Pacific Squadron, 1855-8 ; bombardment of Guaymas and battle of San 
Gabriel, in Mexican war; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; 
rendezvous, Boston, 1851 ; unemployed, 1851-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 18th, 1855 ; brig Perry, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-frigate 
Minnesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; bombardment of 
Forts Hatteras and Clarke ; engagement with rebel ram Merrimack, in Hamp- 
ton Roads ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; com- 
manding steam gunboat Genessee, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Morgan, during the passage of the fleet into 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; commanding steam gunboat Gettysburg, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Commander, December 29th, 
1856; commanding receiving-ship, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868. 



COMMANDER MILTON HAXTON, 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October IDth, 1841 ; 
attached to brig Dolphin, Home Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Congress, Brazil 
Squadron, 1843-5; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1846 ; Home Squadron, 
1846-7; attack on Alvarado, 1846; Naval School, 1847-S; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; mail-steamer Ohio, 1850 ; mail- 
steamer Baltic, 1851 ; sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1852-4. 

Attack on and capture and destruction of Imperial Chinese fortified camp, (de- 
fended by several thousand troops,) by a party of about three hundred American 
and British "blue-jackets" and Marines, at Shanghai, April, 1854. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific 
Squadron, 1856-8; receiving-ship, New York, 1858; steamer Mystic, Coast of 



COMMANDERS. 123 

Africa, 1860-1 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; attack and 
capture of Fort Macon, April 26th, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam-gunboat Kineo, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863; commanding steamer Maratanza, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commanding steamer Mercedita, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; naval rendezvous, New York, 1866; receiving- 
ship, New York, 1866-7; commissioned as Commander, December 29th, 1866; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1868; commanding the store-ship Onward, Pacific 
fleet, 1869. 



COMMANDEK JOHN H. KUSSELL. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from same State, September 14th, 
1841 ; attached to sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop St. Marys, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-6 ; steamer Alleghany, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1847 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; mail-steamer 
Georgia, 1850-2; North Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1852-6; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1865; ordnance duty, Washington, 1857-60; 
steam-frigate Colorado, 1861. 

Led the boarding-party in the attack on rebel privateer Judith, at Pensacola, 
Florida, 1861 ; wounded in the arm by buckshot. 

Commanding steam gunboat Kennebec, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Vicksburg and Grand 
Gulf; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance 
duty, Washington, 1864 ; commanding sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Califor- 
nia, 1866-9; commissioned as Commander, January 28th, 1867. 



COMMANDER ROBERT F. R. LEWIS. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Missouri, October 19th, 
1841 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, Home Squadron, 1841-5 ; sloop Cyane, 
Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; several skirmishes with the enemy during the Mexi- 
can war ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; steamer Vixen, 
Home Squadron, 1849-50; mail steamer Pacific, 1851 ; steamer Fulton, Home 
Squadron, 1852; Observatory, Washington, 1853 ; practice-ship Preble, 1854-5; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; store-ship Supply, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1856-7; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1858; frigate Sabine, 
Brazil Squadron, 1859; frigate Sabine, Home Squadron, 1860; steamer De 
Soto, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862; commanding steam gunboat 
Itasca, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Commander, January 29th, 
1867; commanding steam-sloop Resaca, Pacific Fleet, 1869. 



124 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER ANDREW W. JOHNSON. 

BOKN in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, Oc 
tober 19th, 1841 ; attacbed to sloop Marion, "West India Squadron, 1841-3 
sloop Warren, Pacific Squadron, 1844-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
August lOtb, 1847; store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 1848 ; store-ship Relief^ 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1850-51 ; Naval Observatory, Washino-ton, 1850-2 : 
sloop Levant, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant 
September 15th, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, 1856-7 ; steam-frigate Saranac 
Pacific Squadron, 1858-9; sloop Savannah, North Atlantic Blockading Squad 
ron, 1861 ; engagement with rebel steamer Teazer, in James river, Virginia 
two engagements with rebel steamer Yorktown, in James river, Virginia, 1861 
steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1864 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; engagements in iron-clads Le- 
high and Montauk with rebel batteries in Stono river, S. C, from 3d to 9th of 
July, 1864 ; Naval Observatory, Washington, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, February 2d, 1867; Chief of Staff of South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDER PHILIP C. JOHNSON, Je. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, August 31st, 1846; during the 
Mexican war, present at the bombardment of Vera Cruz and at Tuspan ; attached 
to frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8 ; Naval School, 1850 ; frigate Con- 
gress, Brazil Squadron, 1850-1; Naval Academy, 1852; promoted to Passed 
Slidshipman, June 8th, 1852 ; store-ship Fredonia, Pacific Squadron, 1853 ; 
Coast Survey, 1854-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855 ; 
steam-sloop San Jacinto, Coast of Africa, 1859-61 ; commanding steamer 
Tennessee, Western Gulf Squadron, 1861-3 ; present at the bombardment and 
passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862; steamer Katahdin, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864; 
Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; steamer Sacramento, special service to North Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Commander, February 2d, 1867 ; Fleet 
Captain, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; at present. Chief of Staff, Pacific 
Fleet. 



COMMANDER JOHN WAITERS. 

Born in Michigan, January 5th, 1831. Appointed from Michigan, Febru- 
ary 12th, 1846; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1846-8; frigate Congress, 
Brazil Squadron, 1850-1 ; Naval Academy, 1852 ; promoted to Passed Mid- 
shipman, June 8th, 1852 ; sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 1853-6 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855 ; Naval Academy, 1857-9 ; 
sloop Preble, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1860-2. 



COMMANDERS. 125 

Oq board the Minnesota in tte battles of the 28th rind 29th of August, 1861. 
On the Coast of North Carolina, in a boat expedition, in the same year ; up 
Black river, nine miles from Fortress Monroe, captured a schooner and destroyed 
a number of blookade-ruuners ; engaged Sewell's Point batteries and rebel ram 
Merrimac and her consorts, March 8th, 1862. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; steam-sloop Mo- 
Dongahela, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; commanded the gunboat Kineo, 
at the passage of Port Hudson, on the Mississippi river, March 14th, 1863. 

In June, patrolling the Mississippi river, looking out for General Green's 
Texas rebels, who were advanci-ng on the city of Donaldsonville in great force ; 
from July 4th to July 10th, 1863, convoyed army transports by the rebel bat- 
teries posted on the Burnside and Winchester plantations, five miles below 
Donaldsonville, Louisiana, and fought these batteries going and returning. 

Special duty, Baltimore, 1866; Naval Academy, 1867; commissioned as 
Commander, April 14th, 1867; commanding store-ship Cyane, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER S. LIVINGSTON BREESE. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, May 14th, 1846; attached to 
sloop Germantown, ITome Squadron, 1846-8 ; sloop St. Marys, East India Squad- 
ron, 1849-50; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1851; Naval Academy, 1852; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 8th, 1852 ; brig Dolphin, special service, 
1853; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1853-4; Coast Survey, 1855-7; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1858-60 ; steamer Crusader, 1861 ; steamer Quaker City, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Comman- 
der, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Ottawa, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1863-4; Inspector, &o., Navy Yard, Pensacola, Florida, 1867-8; 
commissioned as Commander, April 14th, 1867. 



COBIMANDER HENRY WILSON. 

Born in New Y ork. Appointed from New York, October 22d, 1 847 ; attached 
to steamer Alleghany, Brazil Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop Marion, East India 
Squadron, 1849-50; sloop Plymouth, 1851; Home Squadron, 1852; Naval 
Academy, 1853 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 10th, 1853 ; steamer 
Fulton, Home Squadron, 1853-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 
1855; Coast Survey, 1857-8; steamer Caledonia, Brazil Squadron and Para- 
guay Expedition, 1858-9 ; store-ship Relief, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; sloop 
Vandalia, 1861 ; steamer Hatteras, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; command- 
ing steam-gunboat Owasco, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Cayuga, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1866-7 ; 
commanding steamer Saco, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867—9 ; commissioned as 
Commander, April 30th, 1867. 



126 COMMANDERS. 

COMMAliTDER A. B. K. BEXHAM. 

Born in New York, 1832. Appointed from New York, November 24th, 1847 ; 
attached to sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1847-8 ; brig Dolphin, East 
India Squadron, 1849-50 ; sloop Plymouth, 1850-1 ; steam-frigate Saranac, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2; Naval Academy, 1853 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 10th, 1853 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1853-7; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1857-8; steamer Western- 
port, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steamer Crusader, 
Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; steamer Bienville, South Atlantic Blockadino; Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; battle of Port Royal, 1861 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, 1863 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam gun- 
boat Penobscot, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; temporary duty. 
Navy Yard, New York, 1866; steamer Susquehanna, special service, 1867; 
commissioned as Commander, June 9th, 1867 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER JOSEPH S. SKERRETT. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, October 12th, 1848; attached to razee 
Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-52; sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 
1852-4 ; Naval Academy, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 
1855 ; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1856 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1856-9 ; sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1860-3 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant^Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding gunboat Katahdin, Western 
Gulf Squadron ; engagement with rebel fortifications at the mouth of the Brazos 
river, Texas, June 27th, 1864 ; commanding steamer Aroostook, Western Gulf 
Squadron, 1863-5 ; naval rendezvous, Washington, 1866-7; commanding ap- 
prentice-ship Portsmouth, 1867-8; commissioned as Commander, June 9th, 
1867; Naval Academy, 1869. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS H. BAKER. 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed from New Hampshire, October 12th, 
1848 ; attached to frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-50 ; 
sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-3; Naval Academy, 1854; promoted 
to Passed Midshipman, June 13th, 1854 ; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 
1854-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855. 

While attached to John Adams, in 1855, on boat expedition, when several 
Fejee towns were attacked, captured and burned. 

Steamer Water Witch, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60 ; 
steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1861-3; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steam gunboat Huron, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commanding steamer Vicksburg, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

While in command of the Vicksburg, stationed with other vessels to guard 
the Fort Casewell entrance to Cape Fear river, during the attack on Fort Fisher, 
in January, 1865. Also, assisted to embark General Butler's army, after the 
first attack on Fort Fisher, December, 1864. 



COMMANDERS. 127 

Temporary duty, Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1866; commanding steamer Unadllla, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Commander, July 24th, 1867 j 
navigation duty, Norfolk, 1869. 



COMMANDER AUSTIN PENDERGRAST. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, October 14th, 1848; attached 
to razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1848-52 ; frigate Columbia, 
Home Squadron, 1853 ; Naval Academy, 1854 ; promoted to Passed Midship- 
man, June 15th, 1854; Coast Survey, 1855; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 16th, 1855; brig Dolphin, Coast of Africa, 1855-6 ; ordnance duty, 
Washington, 1858 ; steamer Memphis, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedi- 
tion, 1858-9 ; frigate Congress, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1860-1 ; frigate 
Congress, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861. 

Lieutenant Pendergrast was attached to the frigate Congress at the time that 
vessel was sunk by the rebel ram Merrimack, and during a portion of the engage- 
ment was in command. Lieutenant Joseph Smith, his senior officer, having been 
killed. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding 
steamer Water Witch, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4. 

On the night of June 2d, 1864, the Water Witch was boarded by a large 
body of rebels, and, after a sharp fight, of brief duration, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Pendergrast was obliged to yield his vessel to the enemy. 

Commanding steamer Nyack, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned 
as Commander, August 31st, 1867; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 1869. 



COMMANDER JOSEPH P. FYFPB. 

Born in Ohio, July 26th, 1832. Appointed from Ohio, September 9th, 
1847 ; attached to bomb-vessel Stromboli, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop 
Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1848-50 ; Home Squadron, 1852 ; Naval Academy, 
1853-4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1854; steam-frigate San 
Jacinto, special service, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 
1855 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1856-7 ; sloop Germantown, East 
India Squadron, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, 1860-1 ; steam-frigate Minne- 
sota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863—5. 

Took part in the destruction of the blockade runner, Hebe, and two rebel 
guns on the beach near Fort Fisher, N. C, August, 1863 ; also in the destruc- 
tion of the blockade runner, Ranger, and engagement with infantry below Fort 
Casewell, N. C, January, 1864. 

Engaged a rebel force of artillery above Cox's wharf, James river, May, 1864 ; 
engaged rebel batteries near Deep Bottom, James river, and rebel batteries at 
Curtis' Neck, near Tilgman's wharf, James river, June, 1864; engaged rebel 
batteries and rams near Dutch Gap, January, 1865 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; Navy Yard, Boston, 1867; steamer Oneida, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Commander, December 2d, 1867; 
commanding steamer Centaur, North Atlantic fleet, 1869. 



128 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER WILLIAM P. McCANN. 

Born in Kentucky, May 4th, 1830. Appointed from Kentucky, November 
1st, 1848; attached to frigate Raritan, Home Squadron, 1848-50; frigate 
Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1850-3; Naval Academy, 1854; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 15th, 1854; frigate Independence, flag-ship Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-7; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 16th, 1855; frigate 
Sabine, Brazil Squadron, 1858-61 ; steam gunboat Maratanza, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1862. 

Engaged at siege of Yorktown and with batteries at Gloucester Point; en- 
gagement at West Pobt, Va., May 9th, 1862 ; capture of rebel gunboat 
Teazer, July 4th, 1862 ; frequently under fire during the guerilla warfare in the 
James and Appomattox rivers ; engagement at Point of Rocks, Va., between 
gunboats and rebel infantry and artillery. 

Commanding steamer Hunchback, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3. 

Engagement with Fort Casewell and batteries off Cape Pear river, October 
11th, 1862 ; defence of Fort Anderson, Newborn, North Carolina, March 14th, 
1863. In command of naval forces in Pamlico river during the siege of Wash- 
ington, N. C. In three engagements with Hill's Poiat, Swan's Point and Rod- 
man's Quarter, April, 1863. 

Commanding steam gunboat Kennebec, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863^. 

In command of the Kennebec in the action with Battery G and Fort Mor- 
gan, July 3d, 1864, while attacking a blockade-runner; and at the burning of 
the " Ivanhoe," on the night of July 6th, 1864, under the guns of Port Mor- 
gan and shore batteries ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864. 

Naval Academy, 1866 ; Gulf Squadron, 1867 ; naval rendezvous, Philadel- 
phia, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Commander, December 8th, 1867 ; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER OSCAR F. STANTON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, December 29th, 1849 ; 
Naval School ; attached to steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 
1851-4; Naval Academy, 1855-6; promoted to Master, 1855; sloop Constel- 
lation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 2d, 
1856; steamer Memphis, South Atlantic Squadron, 1859; store-ship Supply, 
Coast of Africa, 1860; sloop St. Marys, 1861; ordnance duty, Philadelphia, 
1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; steam gun- 
boat Tioga, West India Squadron, 1863 ; steam gunboat Panola, Western Gulf 
Squadron, 1864; ordnance duty. New York, 1865; Naval Academy, 1866-7; 
commissioned as Commander, December 12th, 1867 ; commanding steamer Pur- 
veyor, special service, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER BUSHROD B. TAYLOR. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, April 3d, 1849; attached to 
sloop John Adams, Coast of Africa, 1850-i ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squad- 



COMMANDERS. 129 

ron, 1852-4; promoted to Master, September 16tli, 1855; sloop St. Louis, 
Coast of Africa, 1855-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July Slst, 1856 ; store 
ship Release, Brazil Squadron, 1859 ; sloop Prebla, Home Squadron, 1860 
steam-frigate Colorado, 1861; steam gunboat Cimmaron, N. A. B. Squadron, 
1862 ; engagement with rebel field-battery at Harrison's Landing, July, 1862 
steam gunboat Cimmaron, S. A. Blockading Squadron, 1863; engagement with 
rebel batteries on St. Johns river, Florida, November, 1862; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam gunboat Kanawha, 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1866; 
Naval Academy, 1866-9; commissioned as Commander, March 14th, 1868; 
commanding store-ship Idaho, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 



COMMANDER HENRY ERBEN. 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from New York, June 17th, 1848 ; attached 
to frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; on leave, 1852 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1852-4; Naval Academy, 1855 ; pro- 
moted to Master, September 15th, 1855 ; special duty, 1856 ; store-ship Supply, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-7; commissioned as Lieutenant, December 27th, 
1856; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1853-60; steamer Hunts- 
villa, Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862; engagement 
with Fort Pillow, April, 1862 ; engagement with rebel fleet at Fort Pillow, May 
10th, 1862; capture of Memphis, June 6th, 1862; passage of Vicksburg bat- 
teries, July 15th, 1862 ; engagement at Baton Rouge, La., and destruction of 
rebel ram Arkansas, August 6th, 1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862 ; iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; 
engagement with Fort McAllister, Ogeechee river, March, 1863 ; attack upon 
forts below Charleston, April 7th, 186-3 ; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 
1863-4; commanding steamer Panola, "Western G-ulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866 ; commanding steamer Huron, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commanding steamer Kansas, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Commander, May 6th, 1868. 



COMMANDER EDWARD P. McCREA. 

BoaN in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, October 16th, 1849 ; at- 
tached to sloop Germantown, Home Squadron, 1850-3 ; brig Perry, Coast of 
Africa, 1854; Naval Academy, 1855; promoted to Master, September 15th, 
1855 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1855-6 ; sloop John Adams, 
Pacific Squadron, 1856-8; commissioned as Lieutenant, January 24th, 1857 ; 
steamer Caledonia, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; com- 
manding steamer Jacob Bell, Potomac flotilla, 1861, and James river flotilla, 
1862 ; several engagements with rebel batteries on the Potomac and James 
rivers; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; steam- 
sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1862-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European 
Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Commander, May 27th, 1868; command- 
ing steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 
9 



130 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDEK RICHAED W. MEADE. 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from California, October 2d, 1850 j at- 
taclied to steam-frigate San Jacinto, Blediterranean Squadron, 1851-4 j frigate 
Columbia, Home Squadron, 1854-5^ Naval Academy, 1856 j promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856 ; steam-frigate Merrimac, special service, 
1856-7 ; sloop Cumberland, Coast of Africa, 1857-9 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, January 23d, 1858; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60; 
steam gunboat Conemaugh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steam 
gunboat Marblebead, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863—4. 

On the 25th of December, 1863, the Marblebead, ■while lying in Stono 
river, South Carolina, was fired on from two batteries of field and siege artil- 
lery posted advantageously in the woods. The Marblebead replied vigorously, 
and slipping the cable took position near the enemy's guns, and after a sharp 
contest of an hour the rebels retired in disorder, leaving one gun and caisson 
behind them. Commander Baloh, the Division Commander, in bis official re- 
port to Admiral Dablgren, thus speaks of the afiair : " I desire to bear my tes- 
timony to the skill and bravery of Lieutenant-Commander Meade, who, under 
a sharp fire, worked his battery in a most rapid manner, and handled his vessel 
admirably." Admiral Dablgren, in his report to the Navy Department, unites 
with Commander Baloh in the high praise accorded to Lieutenan(>Commander 
Meade for the promptness aod vigor with which he repelled the attack of the 
enemy. 

Commanding steam gunboat Chocura, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5; Naval Academy, 1865-8; commissioned as Commander, September 
20th, 1868 ; commanding steamer Saginaw, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; 
special duty, 1869. 



COMMANDER CHARLES C. CARPENTER. 

Born in Blassachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, October 1st, 1850 ; 
attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval Academy, 
1856; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856; sloop St. Marys, 
Home Squadron, 1856-7 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1858-9 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, January 23d, 1858 ; steamer Mohawk, Brazil Squadron, and Para- 
guay Expedition, 1858-60; steamer Mohawk, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; steamer 
Flag, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; iron-clad Catskill, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1S63 ; attacks on the defences of Charleston, April 9, 1863 and 
July 10th, 1863 ; Naval Academy, 1863-5 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-7 ; commanding steamer Wyoming, Asiatic Squadron, 
1868 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1868-9 : commissioned as Commander! 
1869. ' 



COMMANDER WILLIAM A. KIRKLAND. 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from North Carolina, July 2d, 1850 • 
attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; Naval Academy' 



COMMANDERS. 131 

1856 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Brazil Squadron, 1S5S-7 ; sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1857-9 j commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 18th, 1858 ; store-ship Release, Brazil Squadron, 
1860; steamer Pulaski^ coast of Brazil, 1861-3; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862; steam-sloop Wyoming, East India Squadron, 
1863-4; commaudiaj; iron-clad Winnebago, Western (rulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; served under Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher in the combined 
movements of the military and naval forces against the defences of the city of 
Mobile, which resulted in the capture of that place and the surrender of the 
rebel fleet ; commanding steamer Wasp, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-9 ; 
commissioned as Commander, 1869. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM H. DANA. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, May 1st, 1850 ; attached to sloop 
Decatur, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; frigate Constitution, coast of Africa, 1852-5; 
Naval Academy, 1856; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 1856-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
July 1st, 1858; steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; steam gunboat Genessee, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862, and Western G-ulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863; attack on Port Hudson, March, 1863; commanding gunboat 
Cayuga, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commanding steam gun- 
boat Winona, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864r-5 ; ordnance duty, 
Boston, 1866; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867; command- 
ing steamer Kansas, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, 1869. 



COMMANDER EDWARD E. POTTER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Illinois, February 5th, 1850; attached 
to sloop Decatur, Home Squadron, 1852 ; frigate Constitution, Coast of Africa, 
1853-5; Naval Academy, 1856; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 
1856 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Coast of Brazil, 1857-9 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, July 9th, 1858 ; steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; Western Gulf Squadron, 
1862 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and capture 
of New Orleans; engagement with field-battery at Grand Gulf, Mississippi, 
June 9th, 1862 ; passed Vicksburg batteries twice ; engagement with ram Ar- 
kansas, above Vicksburg, June, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Command- 
er, July 16th, 1862; steam-sloop Lackawanna, Western Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; commanding iron-clad Mahopac, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; several engagements with Howlett House batteries, Decem- 
ber, 1864 ; two engagements at Port Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 
1865; bombardment of Fort Anderson, February 18th, 1865; steamer Rhode 
Island, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; frigate Franklin, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Commander, 
1869. 



132 COMMANDEES. 

COMMANDER LESTER A. BEARDSLEE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, Marcli 5th, 1850 ; attached 
to sloop Plymouth, East India Squadron, 1851— 5; participated in one battle 
and several skirmishes with the Chinese army, at Shanghai ; Naval Academy, 
1856; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 20th, 1856; steam-frigate Merri- 
mack, special service, 1856—7 ; sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 
1857-60 ; promoted to Master, January 22d, 1858 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant, 1859 ; sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1860-3 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863; attack on the defences of Charleston harbor, April 7th, 1863; steam- 
sloop Wachusett, special service, 1864-5 ; capture of rebel steamer Florida by 
the Wachusett, in October, 1864; commanding steam gunboat Aroostook, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 
1868-9 ; commissioned as Commander, 1869 ; at present on duty at Hydro- 
graphical Office, Washington, D. C. 



COMMANDERS ON RETIRED LIST. 



COMMANDER NATHANIEL C. BEYANT. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, December 23d, 1836; attached to 
sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 1838-41; Naval School, Philadelphia, 1842-3; 
sloop Plymouth, Pacific Squadron, 1843-5 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
June 29th, 1843 ; sloop Dale, Pacific Squadron, during Mexican war and to 
1849 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 7th, 1850 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil 
Squadron, 1850-3 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1854 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, 
East India Squadron, 1855-8 ; receiving ship, Boston, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop 
Piichmond, 1861 ; Blississippi Squadron, 1862, in several engagements with the 
enemy ; commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; retired, September 
26th, 1864. 



COMMANDER JOHN F. ABBOTT. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 27th, 
1837 ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1837-41 ; 
Naval School, Philadelphia, 1842-3 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 
29th, 1843 ; attached to Squadron on Coast of Africa, 1843-5 ; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1849-50 ; promoted to Master, October 3d, 1850 ; receiving-ship 
Philadelphia, 1851; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 22d, 1851- steam- 
frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1851-3 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5 ; retired 
September 13th, 1855; unemployed from 1858-69; commissioned as Com- 
mander, 1867. 



COMMANDERS. 133 

COMMANDER BAYSE N. "WESTCOTT. 

Born iq New Jersey. Appointed from Florida, December 5th, 1837; Brazil 
Squadron, 1838-40 j Naval School, Philadelphia, 1842-3 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, June 29th, 1843 ; brig Somers, Home Squadron, 1843-5 ; store- 
ship Supply, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-8 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1848-50; promoted to Master, October 18th, 1850; frigate St. Lawrence, 
special service, 1850-1 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, June 11th, 1851 ; Coast 
Survey, 1853-4; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1855-7; Light- 
house Inspector, 1858; frigate Santee, 1861; commissioned as Commander,,, 
July 16th, 1862; retired, May 14th, 1863 ; special duty, New York, 1865;' 
Navy Yard, Pensaeola, Florida, 1868-9. 



COMMANDEE ANDREW J. DRAKE. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, December 5th, 1887 ; 
sloop Levant, West India Squadron, 1838-40 ; Naval School, Philadelphia, 
1841-3; promoted to Passed Midshipman, June 29th, 1843; frigate Columbus, 
East India Squadron, 1844-8; Navy Yard, Boston, 1850; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, October 16th, 1851 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1852-3 ; 
sloop Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7; receiving-ship, New York, 1858; 
receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1859; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 1860-2; 
commissioned as Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Sassacus, 
1865-6; retired, April 12th, 1867. 



COMMANDER JOHN C. BEAUMONT. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 1, 1838 ; at- 
tached to sloop Ontario, West India Squadron, 1838-41 ; frigate Constellation, 
East India Squadron, 1842—4; promoted to Passed Midshipman, May 20th, 
1844 ; brig Somers, Home Squadron, 1844-5 ; sloop Jamestown, Coast of 
Africa, 1845-6 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; Observatory, Wash- 
ington, 1848; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52; pro- 
moted to Master, August 30th, 1851; commissionedasLieutenant, August 29th, 
1852 ; Observatory, Washington, 1853—4 ; steamer San Jacinto, special service, 
1855; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1856; steam-frigate Wabash, Home.. 
Squadron, 1857 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
East India Squadron, 1860-2; commissioned as Commander, July 14th, 1862 ; 
commanding steam gunboat Sebago, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; commanding steamer Mackinaw, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; commanding iron-clad Miantonomah, European Squadron, 1866-7 : 
retired, April 27th, 1868. 



134 COMMANDERS. 

COMMANDER GEORGE A. STEVENS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Tennessee, May 13 tL, 1840 ; at- 
tached to frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1840-3 ; steam-sloop Princeton, 
special service, 1844-5 ; Naval School, 1846 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
July 11th, 1846; razee Independence, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1846-8; 
Coast Survey, 1849-50; frigate Raritan, Pacific Squadron, 1850-2; store-ship 
Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1852-5; commissioned as Lieutenant, Sept. 
14th, 1855 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; ordnance duty, Bos- 
ton, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; com- 
' manding steam gunboat Huron, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; 
retired, October 25th, 1865 ; commissioned as Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; 
equipment duty, Pensaoola, 1867-9. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM P. BUCKNBR. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Arkansas, Septetnber 9th, 1841 ; 
attached to sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1841—4; frigate Constitution, 
East India Squadron, 1844-5 ; frigate Constitution, Pacific Squadron, 1846 ; 
promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; sloop Saratoga, Home 
Squadron, 1847-8; sloop Portsmouth, Coast of Africa, 1849—50 ; Naval Aca- 
demy, 1852-5; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; frigate St. 
Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 1856-9 ; sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1861-2 ; 
ordnance duty, Navy Yard, New York, 1862-8 ; commissioned as Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 ; retired, August 16th, 1864. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM MITCHELL. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, Sep- 
tember 24th, 1841 ; attached to frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-4 ; 
frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1844-7 ; frigate Congress, East India 
Squadron, 1847-9; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; 
mail-steamer Ohio, 1849-52 ; brig Bainbridge, Coast of Brazil, 185-3-5 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 14th, 1855 ; special duty, Washington, 
1858; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-61; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty, Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, 1862-4 ; West G-ulf Blockading Squadron^ 1865 ; commissioned as 
Commander, March Bd, 1865 ; Inspector, &c.. Navy Tard, Washington, 1867 ; 
retired, January 11th, 1867. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM GIBSON. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 11th, 1841; 
attached to sloop Concord, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; brig Lawrence, Home 



COMMANDERS. 135 

Squadron, 1843-5 ; Home Squadron, 1847 ; steamer Mississippi, Home Squad- 
ron, 1848-50 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; Coast 
Survey, 1850-2 ; steamer John Hancock, North Pacific Expedition, 1853-4 ; 
commanding steamer Fenimore Cooper, North Pacific Expedition, 1854 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; sloop Vincennes, North Pacific 
Expedition, 1856 ; special duty, Washington, 1857-8 ; frigate Sabine, Brazil 
Squadron, 1858 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commaoding steamer Yankee, Potomac flotilla, 
1862; commanding steam gunboat Seneca, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863 ; commanding steam gunboat Nipsic, South Atlantic Squadron, 1864 ; 
commanding steamer Mahaska, Bast Gulf Squadron, 1865; commissioned as 
Commander, March 8d, 1865 ; retired, April 26th, 1867 ; commanding steamer 
Tahoma, 1867; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1868-9. 



COMMANDER GEEENLEAP CILLEY. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, February 26th, 1841 ; attached to 
frigate Cumberland, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843-5 ; sloop Plymouth, Brazil 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1846-7 ; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; Naval School, 1848 ; frigate Rari- 
tan. Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; store-ship Predonia, 
Pacific Squadron, 1852-3; Pacific Squadron, 1854; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Pacific Squadron, 1855 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; 
sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; steamer Metacomet, Brazil Squadron 
and Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1860 ; 
steamer Pulaski, Brazil Squadron, 1861-3; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 16th, 1862 ; retired March 18th, 1865; commissioned as Com- 
mander, March 3d, 1865. 



COMMANDER SAMUEL MAGAW. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 23d, 1841 ; 
attached to frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; brig Porpoise, Home 
Squadron, 1845-6 ; Naval School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, 
August 10th, 1847 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51 ; Pacific 
Squadron, 1853 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1854-5 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1856-8 ; steamer Pocahontas, 1861 ; commanding steamer Thomas Freeborn, 
Potomac flotilla, 1862-3; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 
1862; commanding steamer Commodore Read, Potomac flotilla, 1863-4; com- 
manding steamer Lenapee, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; commanding steamer 
Tallapoosa, Gulf Squadron, 1866 ; commissioned as Commander, October 10th, 
1866. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM C. WEST. 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from New York, January 30th, 1841 ; at- 
tached to frigate United States, Pacific Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop Vincennes, 



136 COMMANDERS. 

East India Squadron, 1845-6 ; Naval School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipmac, August 10th, 1847 ; sloop St. Louis, Brazil Squadron, 1849-51 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 15th, 1855 ; Naval Observatory, V/a-shington, 1856-7 ; sloop Vin- 
cennes. Coast of Africa, 1858-60 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 1861; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; ordnance duty. Navy Yard, Boston, 
1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commissioned as Com- 
mander, March 3d, 1865; commanding at Beaufort, 1865; retired, April 26th, 
1866 ; special duty, Portsmouth, N. H., 1868. 



COMMANDER FRANCIS G. DALLAS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 8th, 
1841 ; attached to frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1841-3 ; frigate Colum- 
bia, Mediterranean Squadron, 1843-5; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1846; sloop 
Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1846-7; Naval School, 1847-8; promoted to 
Passed Midshipman, August 10th, 1847 ; unemployed from 1849 to 1855 ; sloop 
Decatur, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, September 
15th, 1855; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1858; sloop Dale, Coast of Africa, 
1859-60; retired, December 16th, 1864; commissioned as Commander, March 
3d, 1865 ; sick from 1861 to 1869. 



COMMANDER NATHANIEL T. WEST. 

BoEN in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, February 18th, 
1841 ; attached to schooner Grampus, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; sloop St. 
Louis, East India Squadron, 1845; Naval School, 1846; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, August 10th, 1847; Home Squadron, 1847; steamer Vixen, 
Home Squadron, 1848 ; Germantown, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Sur- 
vey, 1851; sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1852; sloop Macedonian, East India 
Squadron, 1853 ; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1854-7 ; retired, Septem- 
ber 13th, 1855 ; sick from 1855 to 1869 ; commissioned as Commander, March 
3d, 1865. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM M. GAMBLE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New York, May 1st, 1841; attached 
to steamer Missouri, Home Squadron, 1841-4 ; frigate Savannah, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1844-6 ; Naval School, 1847-8 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 
10th, 1847 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; Observ- 
atory, Washington, 1851 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1851-3 ; 
sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1853-5; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
September 15th, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856-8; sloop Saratoga, Home Squad- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS 137 

ron, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer 
Pocahontas, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863; Souli Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864 ; commissioned as Commander, Marched, 1865. 



COMMANDER EDMUND W. HENRY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, April 7th, 1842 ; attached 
to sloop Saratoga, Coast of Africa, 1842-4; frigate Columbus, East India Squad- 
ron, 1845-6; Naval School, 1847-8; promoted to Passed Midshipman, August 
10th, 1847 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-50 ; mail- 
steamer, Georgia, 1851-2; surveying the river La Plata, 1852-6; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, September 15th, 1855 ; special duty, Washington, 1857-8 ; 
steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858; sloop Savannah, 1861; 
steam gunboat Sebago, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1863 ; steam-frigate Colorado, 
West Gulf Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steam gunboat Owasco, Western 
Gulf Squadron, 1864 ; commissioned as Commander, Blarch 3d, 1865 ; South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865; commanding steamer Nipsic, Brazil 
Squadron 1866; retired, March 19th, 1867; League Island, Pennsylvania, 
1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES A. BABCOCK. 

Born in New Jersey, June 12th, 1833. Appointed from Michigan, April 8th, 
1850; attached to sloop John Adams, Coast of Africa, 1850-3; brig Bain- 
bridge, Brazil Squadron, 1853-5 ; Naval Academy, 1856 ; promoted to Passed 
Midshipman, June 20th, 1856 ; Coast Survey, 1857 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific 
Squadron, 1858-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; sloop Macedonian, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Wachusett, West India Squadron, 1862 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; commanding steamer Morse, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4. 

September, 1862, defeated rebel battery and infantry at City Point, Virginia ; 
engaged a rebel battery four miles below West Point, on York river, Virginia. 
At White House, Pamunky river, June 20th, 1864, engaged the rebel General 
Wade Hampton and Fitz Hugh Lee's cavalry, with three batteries, driving them 
from their position, and saving six hundred wagons, two thousand horses and 
fifteen hundred men from capture by the enemy. 

Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; ordnance duty, Jefferson Barracks, 1866 ; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1867-8 ; commanding steamer 
Nyack, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THOMAS 0. SELPRIDGE. 

Born in Massachusetts, February 6th, 1836. Appointed from Blassachu- 
settS; October 1st, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-5 ; attached to frigate Inde- 



138 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEES. 

pendenee, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, Novem- 
ber 22d, 1856 J sloop Vincennes, Coast of Africa, 1857-9 ; promoted to Master, 
January 22d, 1858; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861; sloop Cumberland, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Lieutenant Selfridge was on board the Cumberland when she sank, after her 
engagement with the rebel ram Merrimac, in Hampton Roads, March 8th, 1862, 
and was favorably mentioned in the official report of Lieutenant George U. 
Morris, the officer in command of the Cumberland during the engagement ; 
was engaged in Hampton Roads up to the time of the capture of Norfolk. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; Mississippi squad- 
ron, 1862-4. 

Engagements in the vicinity of Vicksburg,-ending in the capture of that city ; 
Yazoo and Red river expeditions. 

Commanding steamer Huron, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Was at first and second bomjsardments of Fort Fisher, bombardment of Fort 
Anderson, Cape Fear river, and operations against Wilmington, North Carolina; 
Naval Academy, 1866-8; commanding steamer Nipsic, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOSEPH N. MILLER. 

BoEN in Ohio, November 22d, 1S36. Appointed from Ohio, April 8th, 
1850; Naval Academy, 1851-4; frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 
1855-6 ; promoted to Passed Midshipman, November 22d, 1856 ; Naval Acade- 
my, 1858; promoted to Master, January 22d, 1858; sloop Preble, Western 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1858-9; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861; brig 
Perry, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 16th, 1862 J iron-clad Passaic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3; iron-clad steamer Sangamon, 1863-4; Fort McAllister, March 8d, 
1863 ; Fort Sumpter, April 7th, 1863 ; iron-clad steamer Monadnock, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at the two attacks on Fort 
Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 1866-7 ; steamer 
Powhatan, flag-ship South Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALFRED HOPKINS. 

Born in New York. Appointed October 1st, 1851 ; Naval School, 1851-5 ; 
frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8; promoted to Master, Novem- 
ber 4th, 1858 ; brig Bainbridge, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, 1861; steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; iron-clad 
steamer Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; capture of 
Roanoke Island, and of rebel squadron off Elizabeth city ; capture of Newborn ; 
bombardment of Fort Sumpter during several days, in November, 1863 ; also 
several small affairs around Sewell's Point, and on the eastern shore of Vir- 
ginia; Naval Academy, 1865; steamer Florida, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868; receiving-shiT), 
Philadelphia, 1868-9. - 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 139 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MONTGOMERY SICARD. 

Born in New York, September 30th, 1836. Appointed fjom New York, 
October 1st, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-5 ; attached to frigate Potomac, 
Home Squadron, 1855-6; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-9; 
promoted to Master. November, 4th, 1858; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861; 
steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861; steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3. 

Bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Chalmetto 
batteries, and destruction of rebel flotilla and transports, April 24th, 1862 ; 
passage of Vicksburg batteries, June, 1862 ; engagement vrith rebel ram Ar- 
kansas, July, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862; 
steam-sloop Ticonderoga, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Two attacks on Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; naval 
and land assault on Fort Fisher, January i5th, 1865 ; bombardment of Fort 
Anderson, February, 1865; Naval Academy, 1866-8 ; steam-sloop Pensaoola, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 : at present, commanding steamer Saginaw, 
Pacific Fleet. 



LIEUTENANT EDMUND 0. MATTHEWS. 

Born in Missouri. Appointed from Missouri, October 2d, 1851; Naval 
Academy, 1851-5; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1855-6; steam-frigate 
Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857 ; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1858 ; pro- 
moted to Master, November 4th, 1858 ; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-frigate Wabash, 
1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
16th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of forts at 
Hatteras Inlet ; commanded Naval Light Artillery, at Honey Hill, South Caro- 
lina, November 30th, 1864 ; battles at Tullifermy Cross Roads, December, 1864; 
Naval Academy, 1866-9 ; at present, in charge of Torpedo Corps. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD P. LULL. 

Born in Vermont, February 23d, 1836. Appointed from Wisconsin, Octo- 
ber 7th, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-5; attached to frigate Congress, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1856-8 ; promoted to Master, November 8th, 1858 ; steam-frigate 
Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-61 ; engagement between Roanoke and forts 
at Hatteras Inlet, July, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1860; Naval 
Academy, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; passage of 
forts in Mobile Bay, and engagement of lebel gunboats, August 5th, 
1864 ; bombardment of Fort Morgan, August 14th, 1864 ; commanding cap- 
tured iron-clad Tennessee, Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; commanded Tennes- 
see at the bombardment of Fort Morgan, August 22d, 1864; steamer Swatara, 
West India Squadron, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9. 



140 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE ALEXANDER F. CROSMAN. 

Born in Missouri, June llth, 1838. Appointed from Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber 1st, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-5 ; attached to frigate Congress, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1856-8 ; promoted to Master, November 4th, 1858 ; steamer 
M. W. Chapin, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop Mohican, 1861 ; steam gunboat 
Tahoma, East Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; commanding steamer Somerset, East 
Gulf Squadron, 1862; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 
1862 ; steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865. 

Engagements at Honey Hill with Naval Brigade of South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, Devaux creek and two others, all on the expedition commanded 
by General Hatch, endeavoring to sever the railroad between Charleston and 
Savannah. Two engagements with battery Marshall, on east end of Sullivan's 
Island. Engagement with Fort Pringle on Stono river. Co-operated with the 
army on Stono river several times, engaging Fort Lamar once. 

Naval Academy, 1866; steamer Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; 
temporary command of barque Onward, store-ship of South Pacific Squadron, 
1868-9 ; at present, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES S. NORTON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 3d, 1851 ; Naval 
Academy, 1851-5 ; attached to frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1855-6 ; 
steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8; promoted to Master, Novem- 
ber 4th, 1858 ; Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-60 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant, 1861; steam-sloop Seminole, 1861; battle of Port-Royal; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 16th, 1862 ; steam gunboat Maratanza, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; steamer Fort Jackson, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; steam-sloop Richmond, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer Shamrock, European Squadron, 
1866-8 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1866-8. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ROBERT P. BRADFORD. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, May 21st, 1852 ; 
Naval Academy, 1852-6 ; steam-frigate Merrimack, special service, 1856-7 ; 
steam-frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8 ; promoted to Master, 1859 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; sloop Portsmouth, 1861 ; steam gunboat 
Chooura, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-8 ; engaged in the reduc- 
tion of Yorktown and Gloucester, and on the York river, in 1863 ; Naval Aca- 
demy, 1865-7; steamer Minnesota, special service, 1867-8; commanding 
steamer Aroostook, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; at present, commanding steamer 
Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet. 



LIETJTENANT-OOMMANDEES. 141 

/ 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ROBERT L. PHYTHIAN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, January 28th, 1852; 
Naval Academy, 1852-6; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil Squadron, 
1857-9 ; promoted to Master, 1859 ; sloop Jamestown, 1861 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Conamander, July 16th, 1862 ; iron-clad Lehigh, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-4 ; iron-clad New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER AUGUSTUS P. COOKE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 27th, 1852 ; Naval 
Academy, 1852-6; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8; promoted 
to Master, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 
1861; steam gunboat Pinola, Western Gulf Squadron, 1862-3; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, August 11th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Estrella, 
Western Gulf Squadron, 1864 ; Naval Academy, 1865-7 ; steam-frigate Frank- 
lin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; at present. Naval Academy. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER LE ROY FITCH. 

Born in Indiana, October 1st, 1835. Appointed from Indiana, October 1st, 
1851; Naval School, 1851-6; attached to sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 
1856-9 ; promoted to Master, 1859; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steamer 
Wyandot, 1861; Mississippi Squadron, 1861-5 ; engaged at Island No. 10, 
and Fort Pillow; capture of Memphis, Tennessee, and destruction of rebel fleet; 
Fort Donaldson, Cumberland river, February 3d, 1863. 

On the morning of the 19th July, 1863, Lieutenant-Commander Le Roy 
Fitch, then in command of the steamer Moose, intercepted the flying guerilla 
Morgan, frustrating him in his attempts to recross the Ohio, at Buffington 
Island, having followed him for more than five hundred miles up the river. 
The zeal, energy and ability displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch called 
forth complimentary letters from Generals Burnside and Cox, and also a con- 
gratulatory letter from Secretary Welles, in which he says: "Your pursuit of 
the flying guerilla Morgan, intercepting him, and frustrating him in his attempts 
to recross the Ohio, capturing his train, a portion of his guns, and routing his 
band, all of which materially crippled his strength and led to his final capture, 
gives additional evidence of your zeal and activity, and reflects additional credit 
on the service and yourself." 

Defended Johnsonville, Tenn., from the attack of the rebel general Forrest ; 
engagement before Nashville, Tennessee, during the operations of Hood ; nu- 
merous minor engagements with guerillas on the Mississippi, Cumberland and 
Tennessee rivers ; was on several land expeditions with the army up the Ten- 
nessee, Cumberland and Ohio rivers ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
September 21st, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 1866; commanding steamer Marble- 
head, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 



142 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THOMAS H. EASTMAN. 

Born in New York, August, 1847. Appointed from New Hampshire, Janu- 
ary 31st, 1853 ; Naval Academy, 1853-6; attaclied to steam-frigate Wabash, 
Home Squadron, 1856-8; promoted to Master, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, 1860 ; commanding steamer Yankee, Potomac flotilla, 1861 ; steamer 
Thomas Freeborn, Potomac flotilla, 1861 ; numerous sharp engagements with 
rebel batteries and guerrillas on the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers, 1861 ; 
steamer Keystone State, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; engagement 
with Forts Hattsras and Clarke; engagement of Keystone State with rebel 
iron-clads Chicura and Palmetto, off Charleston, in 1863 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, September 30th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1868-5; on board the Weehawken at the reduction of Fort Sump- 
ter and Charleston, South Carolina; Naval Academy, 1866-7; commanding 
steamer Penobscot, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867—9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER RUSH R. WALLACE. 

BoKN in Tennessee, November 7th, 1835. Appointed from Tennessee, Blay 
25th, 1852 ; Naval Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1856-9 ; promoted to Master, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
1861 ; steamer Crusader, 1861 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1861-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, October 1st, 1862 ; steam- 
sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; present at the 
two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864 and January, 1865 ; steamer Fort 
Jackson, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; Naval Academy, 1866-7; 
frigate Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; steam-sloop Rich- 
mond, European Fleet, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHESTER HATFIELD. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, May 21st, 1852 ; 
Naval Academy, 1852-6 ; attached to steam-frigate Merrimack, special service, 
1856-7 ; steam-frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8 ; promoted to Mas- 
ter, 1859 ; commissioned as Lieutenant 1860 ; steamer Mohawk, 1861 ; steam 
gunboat Owasco, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment and 
passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and attack on Vicksburg; capture of 
GalvestoD(, Texas ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, October 2d, 1862 ; 
commanding steam gunboat Aroostook, West Gulf Blockading Squadron,1863-4 ; 
steamer Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Acade- 
my, 1866 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; at present on duty at Navy Yard, New York. 



LIEOTENANT-COMMANDEES. 143 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE CHARLES J. McDOUGAL. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 26th, 1852; 
Naval Academy, 1852-6; attached to sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1856-8; 
sloop Marion, Coast of Africa, 1858-60; promoted to Master, 1859; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, January 23d, 1861 ; steamer Saginaw, 1861 ; steam gun- 
boat Port-Royal, East Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, November 16th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Hendrick 
Hudson, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; commanding steamer Ca- 
manohe, San Francisco, California, 1865-6 ; commanding store-ship James- 
town, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8; steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE H. PERKINS. 

Born in New Hampshire, October 21st, 1831. Appointed from New Hamp- 
shire, October 1st, 1851 ; Naval Academy, 1851-6 ; attached to sloop Cyane, 
Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; store-ship Release, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; pro- 
moted to Master, 1859; steamer Sumpter, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 2d, 1861 ; steam gunboat Cayuga, Western Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 13th, 1862 ; 
commanding steam gunboat Sciota, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; 
bombardment of the forts below New Orleans and Chalmette batteries ; passage 
of the forts in Mobile Bay and capture of the city ; skirmishes on the Blissis- 
sippi in the New London, Cayuga and Sciota, and on the blockade of the Coast 
of Texas in the Sciota; special duty, New Orleans, 1866; steam-sloop Lacka- 
wanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8. At present, ordnance duty, Boston. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WELD N. ALLEN. 

Born in Maine, March 27th, 1837. Appointed from Maine, May 24th, 1852 ; 
Naval School, 1852-6; attached to sloop Cyane, Home Squadron, 1857-8; 
brig Perry, Brazil Squadron, 1858-60 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 24th, 1861 ; steam gunboat Kanawha, West- 
ern Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, January 2d, 1863; commanding steamer New London, Western Gulf 
Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 
1865; assault on Fort Fisher, January 15th, 1865. 

In this engagement Lieutenant-Commander Allen was wounded in the left 
arm. 

Steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1866-8 ; receiving-ship, Bos- 
ton, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER NATHANIEL GREEN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 28th, 1852-6 ; 
ittached to steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; sloop St. Louis, 



144 LIETJTENANT-COMMANDEES. 

1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 27th, 1861; steam gunboat Ka- 
tahdin, Western Gulf Squadron, 1861-3. 

Eeinforcement of Fort Pickens, April, 1861 ; bombardment and passage of 
forts below New Orleans and ChaJmette batteries; operations against Vicks- 
burg from April to September, 1862 ; battle of Baton Rouge and destruction of 
the rebel ram Arkansas; numerous skirmishes along the Mississippi river, 
while on the Katahdin and Genessee ; siege and surrender of Port Hudson ; 
capture of the city of Mobile. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, January 2d, 1863 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1865-6 ; receiving-ship Vermont, 1867-8 ; steam-sloop Contoocook, flag- 
ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS B. BLAKE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, September 30th, 1853 ; 
Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Minnesota, East India 
Squadron, 1857-9; steam-frigate Colorado, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 4th, 1861 ; steam gunboat Kennebec, Western Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2 ; destruction of rebel privateer Judith, at Pensacola, September 
14th, 1861 ; bombardment and passage of forts Jackson and St. Philip, and 
passage of Vieksburg, June, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 1863-4 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, January 2, 1863 ; steamer Susquehanna, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1865-6; commanding steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; 
Naval Academy, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES M. PRITCHETT. 

Born in Indiana, August 25th, 1836. Appointed from Indiana, May 27th, 
1852; Naval Academy, 1852-7; attached to steam-frigate Mississippi, East India 
Squadron, 1857-9 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1851 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant, April 3d, 1861 ; Mississippi flotilla, 1861-2 ; steam gunboat Tyler, Mis- 
sissippi Squadron, 1863-4; at Haines' Bluff, December, 1862; siege of 
Vieksburg, 1863; numerous skirmishes on the Mississippi river; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, January 2d, 1864 ; steamer Mahopac, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer Augusta, European Squadron, 
1866-7; steamer Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9; at present 
steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Fleet. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD TERRY. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 21st, 1853; 
Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 
1857-9; steam-sloop Richmond, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-5 ; 
engagement with rebel ram Manassas, and steamers in the Mississippi river, 



LIBTJTENANT-OOMMANDERS. 145 

October 12tli, 1861; Fort McEae and rebel batteries, November 22d, 1861; 
bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, capture of New 
Orleans and passage of Vicksburg, bombardment of batteries at Port Hudson, 
March 14th, 1863 ; battle of Mobile bay, August 5th, 1864 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, January 4th, 1863; steam-frigate Powhatan, Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FEANCIS M. BUNCE. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from same State, May 28th, 1852 ; Naval 
Academy, 1852-7; attached to sloop Germantown, East India Squadron, 
1857-9 ; sloop Macedonian, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 11th, 
1861 ; steam gunboat Penobscot, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; 
skirmishes at Yorktown and Gloucester, April, 1862; engagements at Fort 
Fisher and other rebel batteries at mouth of Cape Fear river, from May to 
August, 1862 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; iron-clad 
Catskill, South Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4. 

JulyiOth, 1863, commanded aboat expedition co-operating with Gen. Gilmore 
in assault on and capture of a part of Morris Island ; participated in all actions at 
siege of Charleston, from July 16th to November 12th, 1863; attack upon Fort 
Sumpter, September 8th, 1863 ; was wounded by the premature explosion of a 
one hundred and fifty pound rifled gun in the turret of the iron-clad Patapsoo. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, January 16th, 1863 ; iron-clad 
Dictator, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; commanding iron-clad 
Monadnock, special cruise, 1865-6 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE BYEON WILSON. 

Born in Ohio, December 17th, 1837. Appointed from Ohio, January 31st, 
1853 ; Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Mississippi, East 
India Squadron, 1857-9 ; steamrsloop Eichmond, Western Gulf Squadron, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, April 16th, 1861 ; commanding iron-clad Mound 
City and a division of the Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; passage of Vicksburg 
batteries, April 16th, 1863 ; attack on Grand Gulf, April, 1863; Deer Creek, 
1863 ; Eed Eiver Expedition, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
November 5th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; steam- 
sloop Plymouth, European Fleet, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE HENEY B. SEELY. 

BoEN in New York, July 7th, 1838. Appointed from New York, May 26th, 

1852 ; Naval Academy, 1852-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Minnesota, East 

India Squadron, 1857-9 ; steamer Keystone State, 1861 ; commissioned as 

Lieutenant, April 17th, 1861 ; steamer Sumpter, South Atlantic Blockading 

10 



146 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1863-5 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, February 21st, 1864; steamer Bienville, 
1866 ; steamer Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK V. MoNAIR. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21st, 
1853 ; Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squad- 
ron, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-2; bombardment 
of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and Chalmette batteries ; engagement at Grand 
Gulf; passage both ways of Vicksburg batteries, and destruction of rebel ram 
Arkansas ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
1862-3 ; steam-sloop Seminole, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; 
steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; at both 
attacks on Fort Fisher ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, April 20th, 
1864 ; steam-sloop Juniata, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; steamer Brooklyn, flag- 
ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1868 ; frigate Frank- 
lin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM B. GUSHING. 

Born in Wisconsin. Appointed from New York, September 25th, 1857 ; 
resigned, 1858; re-entered the service as an acting officer in 1861; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, United States Navy, July 16th, 1862 ; attached to North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-5. 

On the 23d of November, 1862, Lieutenant Cushing, then in command of 
the steamer Ellis, entered New River Inlet, with orders to capture the town of 
Jacksonville, intercept the Wilmington mail, take possession of any vessels 
found in the river, and to destroy any salt works found on its banks. At 1 P. 
M. he reached the town of Jacksonville, captured twenty-five stand of public 
arms, a large mail and two schooners. He then started down the river, shelling 
a rebel camp on his way, and came to anchor about five miles from the outer bar, 
it being impossible to take the steamer from the river that night. On the fol- 
lowing morning the enemy opened on him with two pieces of artillery from a 
blufi', but were soon silenced, the Ellis passing within short range without re- 
ceiving fire. At about five hundred yards from this point the Ellis grounded, 
and every efi'ort was made to get her afloat, but without success. Everything 
was removed from the steamer excepting the pivot-gun and a few small arms ; 
the crew were called to muster and told that they could go aboard the prize 
schooner. Lieutenant Cushing then called for six volunteers to remain with 
him on board the Ellis and fight the remaining gun. Six men came forward, 
two Masters' Mates, Valentine and Barton, amongst the number. The schooner 
was ordered to drop down the channel and await the termination of the impend- 
ing engagement. On the morning of the 25th, the enemy opened a cross fire 
on the Ellis from four points with heavy rifled guns, so disabling the vessel that 
the only alternatives left were surrender, or a pull of one and a half miles in a 
small boat, under fire, to the schooner; the latter alternative was chosen. Lieu- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 147 

tenant Cushing fired the Ellis, reached the schooner and made sail for sea, and 
four hours later arrived at Beaufort. The coolness, courage and conduct of 
Lieutenant Gushing was specially commended in the official reports of Com- 
mander H. K. Davenport and Acting Rear Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding 
N. A. B. Squadron. 

On the night of the 27th of October, 1864, Lieutenant Gushing ascended 
the Koanoke river in a torpedo-boat, having the second cutter of the steamer 
Shamrock in tow, for the purpose of blowing up the rebel ram Albemarle, at 
Plymouth. He passed the rebel steamer Southfield without being noticed, and 
arrived within a short distance of the ram before he was discovered, when he 
cast loose the cutter, ordering her to board the Southfield and capture the picket 
stationed there, while he attacked the ram with the torpedo. Although 
the enemy kept up a severe fire of musketry and with howitzers mounted on the 
wharf, he succeeded in exploding his torpedo under the Albemarle at the same 
instant that the gun of that vessel, to which they were directly opposite, was 
fired on the torpedo-boat, which immediately filled, and the Lieutenant ordered 
his oflBcers and men to save themselves, and jumped overboard. Mostof the party 
were captured, some drowned, and only two escaped. Lieutenant Gushing man- 
aged to reach the shore, and after some hours' travel through the swamps came 
to a creek, where he took possession of a boat belonging to a picket of the 
enemy, and by eleven o'clock the next night had made his way out to the 
steamer Valley Gity. For this daring act Lieutenant Gushing received a vote 
of thanks from Congress, and the following complimentary letter from the Sec- 
retary of the Navy : — 

"Navy Department, November 9th, 1864. 

" Sir — Your report of October 30th has been received, announcing the 
destruction of the rebel iron-clad steamer Albemarle, on the night of the 27th 
ult., at Plymouth, North Carolina. When, last summer, the Department selected 
you for this important and perilous undertaking, and sent you to Eear Admiral 
Gregory, at New York, to make the necessary preparations, it left the details to 
yourself to perfect. To you and your brave comrades, therefore, belongs the 
exclusive credit which attaches to this daring achievement. The destruction of 
so formidabio a vessel, which had resisted the combined attacks of a number of 
our steamers, is an important event touching our future naval and military ope- 
rations. The judgment, as well as the daring courage displayed, would do 
honor to any officer, and redounds to the credit of one of twenty-one years of 
age. On four previous occasions the Department has had the gratification of 
expressing its approbation of your conduct in the face of the enemy, and in 
each instance there was manifested by you the same heroic daring and innate 
love of perilous adventure ; a mind determined to succeed and not to be deterred 
by any apprehensions of defeat. The Department has presented your name to 
the President for a vote of thanks, that yuu may be promoted one grade, and 
your comrades also shall receive recognition. It gives me pleasure to recall the 
assurance you gave me at the commencement of your active professional career, 
that you would prove yourself worthy of the confidence reposed in you, and of 
the service to which you were appointed. I trust you may be preserved through 
further trials, and it is for yourself to determine, whether, after entering upon 
so auspicious a career, you shall, by careful study and self-discipline, be prepared 
for a wider sphere of usefulness on the call of your country. 
"Very respectfully, &c., 

" Gideon Wells, Secretary of the Navy." 

" Lieut. W. B. Cushing, U. S. N., Wasldngton." 



148 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

There was not a year during the war that Lieutenant Gushing did not distin- 
guish himself by some signal act of, perilous adventure. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, October 22d, 1864; steamer Lan- 
caster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; commanding steamer Maumee, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ARTHUR R. YATES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24th, 1853 ; 
Naval Academy, 1853-7 ; attached to steam-frigate Minnesota, East India 
Squadron, 1857-9 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1861-3 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, April 18th, 1861 ; steamer Augusta, 1864 ; Western Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, November 
16fch, 1864; commanding steamer Chocura, Gulf Squadron, 1865-7 ; steamer 
Piscataqua, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Fleet, 
1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN ADAMS HOWELL. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27th, 1854 ; 
Naval Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1858-9 ; store-ship Supply, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 18th, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; 
steam-sloop Ossipee, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 3d, 1865 ; 
steamer De Soto, special service, 1866 ; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1866-7 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALLEN V. REED. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 26th, 1854 ; 
Naval Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to sloop Macedonian, Mediteranean Squad- 
ron, 1858-9; steamer Water Witch, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 
18th, 1861; store-ship Potomac, Ship Island, 1862-3; steamer Pawtuxet, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at both attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865; also, engaged with other defences of Cape 
Fear river, February, 1865; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 
3d, 1865; iron-clad Miantonomah, 1867; steamer Resaoa, North Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1867-8; store-ship Jamestown, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE DEWEY. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont, September 23d, 1854 ; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Meditorranoan Squadron, 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 149 

1858-9; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-3; capture of 
New Orleans, April, 1862 ; Port Hudson, March, 1863 ; engagements with 
rebels below Donaldsonville, Louisiana, July, 1863 ; commissioned as lieuten- 
ant, April 19th, 1861; steam gunboat Agawam, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, and January, 
1865; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 8d, 1865; steamer Kear- 
sarge, European Squadron, 1866 ; frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 1867 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES L. FRANKLIN. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, October 23d, 1854 ; Naval Academy, 
1854—8; attached to sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9; 
steam-frigate Minnesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861; steamer 
Hetzel, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; Capture of Forts Hat- 
teras and Clark ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19th, 1861 ; steamer 
James Adger, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; was engaged at 
Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, Port Macon and Fort Fisher, cutting out 
steamers ; steamer Iosco, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; at Fort 
Fisher in December, 1864, and January, 1865 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 3d, 1865; steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 
1866-7; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE B. WHITE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, September 28th, 1854 ; 
Naval Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 
1858-60 ; was on the Saratoga in the action which resulted in the capture of 
the steamers Miramon and Marquis de la Habana, Vera Cruz, 1860 ; steamer 
Union, Home Squadron, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19th, 1861 ; 
steam gunboat Ottawa, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; at battle 
of Port Royal, 1861 ; engagement at Port Royal Ferry, June 1st, 1862 ; en- 
gagement with rebel flotilla, Wilmington river, February, 1862 ; capture of 
Fernandina, and action in St. Marys river, March, 1862, and operations in 
Stono river ; steamer State of Georgia, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; steamer Mendota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
capture of Fort Fisher; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 3d, 
1865 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; League Island, Pa., 
1869 ; at present, on equipment duty, Philadelphia. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY L. HOWISON. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, September 26th, 1854 ; Naval 
Academy, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1858-60; steamer Pocahontas, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19th, 



150 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

1861 ; steamer Augusta, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; at 
Port Eoyalj engagement with rams off Charleston, 1863; South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864; engagement with the Forts of Charleston, 1863-4 ; 
steamer Bienville, Western Gulf Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 3d, 1865; 
temporary ordnance duty, Washington, 1866 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; ordnance duty, Washington, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALBEET KAUTZ. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 28th, 1854 ; Naval Acade- 
my, 1854-8 ; attached to steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; 
prisoner in North Carolina, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 21st, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford, Western Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; steam-sloop 
Susquehanna, 1863; served .n the Hartford at the capture of New Orleans, 
and the passage of Vicksburg, June 29th and July 16th, 1862; Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1865; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, May 31st, 1865; steamer 
Towanda, 1866; steamer Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8; receiving- 
ship, Norfolk, 1869 ; at present, on duty at Navy Yard, Boston 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALFRED T. MAHAN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September "SOth, 1854 ; 
Naval Academy, 1856-9 ; attached to frigate Congre'ss, Home Squadron, 1861 ; 
steamer Pocahontas, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1863 ; steam-sloop 
Seminole, Western Gulf Squadron, 1863-4; steamer James Adger, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, June 7th, 
1865; steamer Muscoota, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6; steamer Iroquois, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9 ; at present, commanding steamer Aroostook, Asiatic Fleet. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE C. REMEY. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa, September 20th, 1855 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1855-9; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 1860-1 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; steam gunboat Marblehead, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-4 ; was present at the siege of 
Yorktown, and on several occasions engaged the batteries at long range. In 
consequence of the Marblehead being grounded, was compelled to witness the 
battle of West Point, Virginia, without being able to participate. Engagement 
with rebels at White House, Pamunkey river, June 29th, 1862; engaged bat- 
teries on Sullivan's Island, S. C, on two difierent occasions; engaged Battery 
Wagner, Morris Island, S. C, at long range ; took part in general engagement 
of Battery Wagner, August 17th, 1863 ; was in command of naval battery on 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 151 

Morris Island, from August 23d to September 8th, 1863, and was engaged in 
bombardment of Fort Sumpter, and at times Fort Gregg ; had command of tbe 
2d division of boats in the night attack on Fort Sumpter, September 8th, 1863; 
and was taken prisoner by the rebels ; steam gunboat Marblehead, Naval Aca- 
demy, Newport, 1865-6; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, June 25th, 
1865; steamer Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; Naval Academy, 1868-9; 
at present, attached to frigate Sabine, special service. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER NORMAN H. FARQUHAR. 

Born in Pennsylvania, April 11th, 1840. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
September 27th, 1854; Naval Academy, 1854-9; Squadron on coast of 
Africa, 1860-1 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; steam 
gunboat Mahaska, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; steamer 
Rhode Island, West India Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Santiago de Cuba, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; present at both attacks on Fort Fisher; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, August 5th, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 
1866-8^ steamer Swatara, European Squadron, 1868-9; at present, on duty 
at Navy Yard, Boston. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SAMUEL D. GREENE. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 21st, 1855 ; 
Naval Academy, 1855-9 ; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squad- 
ron, 1859-61 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; iron-clad 
steamer Blonitor, North Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2 ; was Executive Officer 
of the Monitor during the engagement with the rebel ram Merrimack, in 
Hampton Roads, March 9th, 1862 ; engagement at Sewell's Point, May 1862 ; 
also in engagement at Fort Darling, James river. May 15th, 1862 ; steamer 
Florida, 1863; steamer Iroquois, special service, 1864-5; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, August 11th, 1865; Naval Academy, 1866-8; steamer 
Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THEODORE F. KANE. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from New York, September 27th, 
1855 ; Naval Academy, 1855-9 ; attached to sloop Constellation, Coast of Africa, 
1859-61 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 
1862-3; steamer Neptune, West India Squadron, 1863-5; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, September 22d, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 1866-8 ; 
steamer Mohongo, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



152 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEKS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BBATTY P. SMITH. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 29th, 1855; 
Naval Academy, 1855-9; attached to steam-sloop Wyoming, Pacific Squadron, 
1859-61 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, East 
Gulf Squadron, 1861-3 ; steamer Mackinaw, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, October 25th, 1865 ; 
steamer Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; Naval Academy, 1866-7 ; 
steamer Shamokin, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; steamer Wasp, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER C. M. SCHOONMAKER. 

Born in New York, February 2d, 1839. Appointed from New York, Sep- 
tember 28th, 1854 ; Naval Academy, 1854-9 ; attached to steam-frigate Minne- 
sota, 1860-1; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861; steam gunboat 
Sagamore, East Gulf Squadron, 1861-2 ; steam gunboat Ootorara, West India 
Squadron, 1862 ; steam gunboat Octorara, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle 
of Mobile bay and capture of Port Morgan ; steamer Augusta, 1865 ; 'commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 24th, 1865 ; steamer Juniata, South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7 ; steamer Pisoataqua, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER RODERICK S. McCOOK. 

Born in Ohio, March 10th, 1839. Appointed from Ohio, September 21st, 
1854; Naval Academy, 1854-9; attached to steam-frigate Minnesota, 1859-61; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, August 31st, 1861 ; commanding steamer Stars 
and Stripes, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; steamer Bienville, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1862-3 ; engagements with rebel batteries in the 
James river and off Wilmington, N. C, Forts Hatteras, Clark, and Roanoke 
Island ; iron-clad steamer Canonicus, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-5; commanded a battery of six howitzers at battle of Newbern, N. C. ; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 
3d, 1865; steamer Tioga, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6; Naval Academy, 1867; 
steamer Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GILBERT C. WILTSE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 20th, 1855 ; 
Naval Academy, 1855-9 ; attached to frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1859-60; frigate Congress, Home Squadron, 1860-2; took part in the battle 
between the Congress and Cumberland and the rebel ram Merrimack, in Hampton 
Roads, March 9th, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, April 19th, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Dacotah, West India Squadron, 1862-3; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 3d, 1865; 



LIEUTENANT- COMMANDERS. 153 

steamer Agawam, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; apprentice-Bhip Sabine, 1868; 
Navy Yard, New York, 1869 ; at present, attached to steamer Centaur, North 
Atlantic Fleet. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOSEPH D. MARVIN. 

Born in Ohio, October 2d, 1839. Appointed from Ohio, September 25th, 
1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to 
steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; 
Naval Academy, 1862-4; steamer Mohican, South Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5; 
present at both attacks on Fort Fisher ; steamer Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, April 12th, 1866 ; steam- 
sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; ordnance duty, 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1867; frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 
1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES O'KANE. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, October 80th, 1856; Naval 
Academy, 1856-60; promoted to Master 1861; attached to steam-frigate 
Niagara, 1861 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Squadron, 1861-3 ; passage 
of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries and capture of New 
Orleans ; passage of Vicksburg; was wounded by a musket-ball in the left leg 
at passage of the forts below New Orleans. Commissioned as Lieutenant, 
July 16th, 1862 ; steam gunboat Paul Jones, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5; engagements at Honey Hill, Tullifirmy Cross Roads, and on 
the Charleston and Savannah railroad ; steamer Rhode Island, flag-ship West 
India Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, April 12th, 
1866; steamer Swatara, European Squadron, 1866-7; Naval Academy, 1868-9; 
at present, attached to steam-sloop Lancaster. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SIMEON P. GILLETT. 

Born in Indiana, November 2d, 1840. Appointed from Indiana, September 
20th, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861; Naval Academy, 1862; steamer State of Georgia, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
July 16th, 1862; steamer Glaucus, North Atlantic Squadron, 1863-4; twice 
engaged with Fort Fisher while chasing blockade-runners ; also with batteries 
on Smith's Island, N. C, and with batteries above Port Fisher, while on same 
duty in 1863 ; steamer Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, January 6th, 1866 ; Naval 
Academy, 1867-9; at present, serving in the European Squadron. 



154 UEUTENANT-OOMMANDEES. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THOMAS L. SWANN. 

BoEN in Maryland, August, 1841. Appointed from Maryland, December 
8tli, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to 
steam-frigate Niagara, 1860-1 ; bombardment of Forts McRae and Barrancas, 
and Pensacola Navy Yard, Nov. 1st, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-3 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; engagement with Fort Morgan and 
rebel fleet, August 5th, 1864 ; bombardment of Fort Morgan, August 22d, 1864 ; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher; steamer Algonquin, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenantrCommander, May 2d, 1866 ; steamer Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 
1866-8 ; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDBE SULLIVAN D. AMES. 

Born in Rhode Island, July 16th, 1840.. Appointed from Rhode Island, 
September 22d, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; 
attached to steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861; Naval Academy, 1862; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1862-4 ; engagement with Sewell's Point Battery, May 8th, 1862 ; steam-frigate 
Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-6; steamer Resaca, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER J. CRITTENDEN WATSON. 

BoKN in Kentucky, August 24th, 1842. Appointed from Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 29th, 1856; Naval Academy, 1856-60; promoted to Master, 1861; 
attached to frigate Sabine, 1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Squadron, 
1862-4; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16, 1862. 

Bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and Chalmette 
batteries, April, 1862; passage of Vicksburg batteries, June and July, 18G2 ; 
passage of Port Hudson, March 14th, 1863; passage of Grand Gulf, March 
19lh and 30th, 1863 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; was wounded 
by a fragment of shell from rebel battery at Warrington. 

Steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship 
European Squadron, 1867-8 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron 
1868-9 ; at present, special duty, Philadelphia. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY B. ROBESON. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 25th, 1856 • 
Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1860 ; attached to stcam-frio-ate 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 155 

Niagara, Blockading Squadron, 1860-1; engagement at Fort McRae, Novem- 
ber 23d, 1861 ; iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, special service, 1863; and South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864. 

Engagement with the defences of Charleston, S. C, April 7th, 1863; com- 
manded a landing party from the New Ironsides in the assault and capture of 
rebel works on the lower part of Morris Island, July 10th, 1863 ; various bom- 
bardments of Forts Wagner, Sumpter, Moultrie, and all the actions in which 
the New Ironsides was engaged off Charleston. 

Steam-frigate Colorado, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5. 

Both assaults on Fort Fisher ; commanded a landing party from the Colorado 
in the assault upon Fort Fisher, January 15th, 1865. 

Steamer Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865—7 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Piscataqua, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ANTOINB R. McNAIR. 

Born in Louisiana. Appointed from Missouri, September 22d, 1856 ; Naval 
Academy, 1856-60; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop Semi- 
nole, 1861; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862; steam-sloop Pow- 
hatan, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-5 ; steamer Chickopee, At- 
lantic Squadron, 186-5-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 
1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, special service, 1867-8; 
steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS S. BROWN. 

BoKN in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24th, 1856 ; 
Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to steam-sloop 
Dacotah, 1861 ; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Squadron, 1862; bombardment 
and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture 
of New Orleans, April 25th, 1862; passage of the batteries of Vicksburg, July 
2d, 1862; Vicksburg batteries and destruction of rebel ram Arkansas, July 15th, 
1862; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862; South Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1863 ; engagement with Fort Wagner, April, 1863 ; Naval 
Academy, 1864-5; steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Nyack, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY D. H. MANLEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 25th, 
1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861. 



156 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Reinforcement of Fort Pickens ; on board the Congress, in her fight with 
the rebel iron-clad Merrimack, March 8th, 1862, and favorably mentioned in the 
official report of the action. 

Steam-sloop Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4. 

Attack on Port Sumpter, April, 186.3 ; attack and capture of lower end of 
Morris Island, July, 1863 ; numerous engagements during the siege of 
Charleston. 

Commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steamer State of Georgia, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; school-ship Sabine, 1866 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, 
flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; Hydrographioal Office, Washington, 
1869; at present, attached to steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic 
Squadron. i 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM WHITEHEAD. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 23d, 
1856; Naval Academy, 18-56-60; promoted to Master, 1861; attached to 
steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861 ; steam gunboat Sonoma, West India Squadron, 
1861-2 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, in York river, from March to 
May, 1862 ; in James river, from May to July, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, July 16th, 1862; iron-clad steamer Passaic, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-5. 

Engaged off Charleston, S. C, from July, 1868, to April, 1864 ; engagement 
in Stono river, S. C, with batteries on James Island, July 3d to 6th, 1864 ; in 
Togoda ereek, February 9th, 1865. 

Attached to iron-clad Monadnock, on her passage from New York to San 
Francisco, 1866; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steamer Saco, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 
1868-9 ; at present, attached to steam-frigate Powhatan, Pacific Squadron. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD A. WALKER. 

Born in Massachusetts, December 31st, 1840. Appointed from same State, 
September 26th, 1856; Naval Academy, 1856-60; promoted to Master, 1861; 
attached to steam-sloop Seminole, 1861 ; slight engagement with battery at 
Freestone Point, on the Potomac river ; frigate Sabine, 1862 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862; steam gunboat Paul Jones, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam gunboat Chippewa, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863-5 ; numerous engagements in the inland waters of North 
and South Carolina and Georgia; steamer Don, Atlantic Squadron, 1866" 
steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-9; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; at present, on duty, at Hydrographi- 
oal Office, Washington, D. 0. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 157 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WINPIELD S. SCHLEY. 

Born in Maryland, 1839. Appointed from Maryland, September 20th, 1856; 
NaYal Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; attached to frigate Po- 
tomao, store-ship at Ship Island, 1861-2 ; steam gunboat Winona, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; engaged with a field battery near Port Hudson, 
La., Deo. 14th, 1862 ; in all the engagements which led to the capture of Port 
Hudson, from March 16th to July 9th, 1863 ; in one or two small skirmishes 
in cutting out schooners ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steam 
gunboat Wateree, Pacific Squadron, 1864-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SILAS CASEY, Jr. 

Born in Rhode Island, September 11th, 1841. Appointed from New York, 
September 25th, 1856; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; promoted to Master, 1861; 
attached to steam-frigate Niagara, 1861 ; engagements with the batteries at 
Pensacola, Florida, October 1861 ; steam gunboat Wissahickoo, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; several engagements with Fort McAllister, Oc- 
tober, 1862 ; first attack on Charleston, under Admiral Du Pont; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steamer Quaker City, North Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1863-5 ; attack on Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; steamer 
Winooski, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 25th, 1866; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM T. SAMPSON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24th, 1857; 
Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; frigate Potomac, 1 861 ; promoted to Master, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862; practice-ship John Adams, 
1862-3; Naval Academy, 1864 ; iron-clad Patapsco, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; was in Patapsco when she was destroyed in Charleston 
harbor, January 15th, 1865 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Naval 
Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALFRED T. SNELL. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25th, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to steam-sloop Pawnee, Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagements with batteries in Potomac river 
during June and October, 1861; Hatteras Inlet, August, 1861; Port Royal, 
November 7th, 1861 ; expedition to Pernandina, Florida, and Stono river, S. C, 
1862 ; St. Johns Blufi', September 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 
16th, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1864 ; steamer 



158 LIEUTENANT- COMMANDERS. 

Glaucus, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, 
European Squadron, 1866-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
25th, 1866 ; at present, on duty at Hydrographical Office, Washington. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM F. STEWART. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania, June 30th, 1840. Appointed from Pennsylvania, 
September 23d, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to steamer Union, 
1861; sloop St. Louis, special service, 1862-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
July 16th, 1862 ; steamer Bienville, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; 
steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE P. RYAN. 

Born in Massachusetts, May 8th, 1842. Appointed from Massachusetts, 
September 30th, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to brig Bainbridge, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, special service, 1862-5 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steamer Lenapee, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9 ; 
at present, attached to frigate Sabine, special service. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE M. BACHE. 

Born in District of Columbia, November 12th, 1840. Appointed from Penn- 
sylvania, November 19th, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to sloop 
Jamestown, Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862; commanding 
iron-clad Cincinnati, Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on Haines' Bluff, 
December 27th, 1862 ; engagement with batteries and sharp-shooters, March, 
1S63 ; engagement with Vicksburg batteries. May 27th, 1863, at which time 
the Cincinnati was sunk. 

Lieutenant Bache received the commendation of his commanding-officer, Rear 
Admiral Porter, for his meritorious conduct in this affair ; and General Sher- 
man, who was an eye-witness of the engagement, testifies, that " the style in 
which the Cincinnati engaged the battery elicited universal praise." Lieutenant 
Bache also received a letter of thanks from the Navy Department. 

Commanding steam gunboat Lexington, Blississippi Squadron, 1863—4 ; en- 
gagement with batteries and sharp-shooters at Blair's Landing, on Red river, 
April 12th, 1864, and at Point of Rooks, La., April 26th, 1864; steam-sloop 
Powhatan, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on 
Fort Fisher, and in the naval assault on the works ; wounded in the rit^ht 
shoulder in the assault on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise 
1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1868 ; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1809. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 159 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BARTLETT J. CROMWELL. 

Born in G-eorgia. Appointed from Nebraska, September 21st, 1857 j Naval 
Academy, 1857-60; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, 1861 j steamer Quaker 
City, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam gunboat Conemaugh, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attack on Morris Island and Battery 
G-regg ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steamer Proteus, East Gulf 
Squadron, 1863-5; steamer Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. HAYWARD. 

Born in Ohio, October 31st, 1838. Appointed from Wisconsin, Septem- 
ber 26th, 1857 ; Naval Academy 1857-60 ; attached to sloop Vandalia, 1861 ; 
battle of Port Royal, November 7th, 1861 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steam gunboat 
Sonoma, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; blockading Charleston 
from December, 1863, to October, 1864; practice-ship Sabine, 1865-6; steamer 
Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; steamer Mohongo, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9; 
at present, on duty at Naval Academy. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN W. PHILLIP. 

Born in New York, August 26th, 1840. Appointed from New York, Sep- 
tember 22d, 1856 ; Naval Academy, 1856-60 ; attached to sloop Marion, 1861; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; steam gunboat Chippewa, special 
service, 1862-3 ; steam gunboat Chippewa, South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863-5; siege of Charleston, July 10th, 1863, to January 1st, 1864; 
wounded in the leg by a splinter in Stono river, July 16th, 1863 ; steam-sloop 
Wachusett, East India Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Richmond, Euro- 
pean Fleet. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY P. PICKING. 

Born in Pennsylvania, January, 1840. Appointed from same State, Septem- 
ber 28th, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; sinking of the privateer Petrel ; 
engagement with the rebel ram Merrimack and Sewell's Point batteries, 1862 ; 
frigate St. Lawrence, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862; West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1864-5 ; several skirmishes with batteries on Sullivan's Island 
during 1864-5: steamer Swatara, West India Squadron, 1865-6; commissioned 



160 LIETJTENANT-COMMANDBKS. 

as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25tli, 1866 ; steamer Swatara, European Squad- 
ron, 1866-8; League Island, Pa., 1868-9; at present, on duty at Naval 
Academy. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDEEICK RODGERS. 

Born in Maryland, October 3d, 1842. Appointed from Maryland, Septem- 
ber 25th, 1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to frigate Santee, 1861-2 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3 ; engagement at Donaldsonville, La., October 4th, 1862 ; Port 
Hudson, La., March 14th, 1863 ; steamer Grand Gulf, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Grand Gulf, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steamer Swatara, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 
1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS O. DAVENPORT. 

Born in Michigan, October 3d, 1842. Appointed from Michigan, Septem- 
ber 26th, 1856; Naval Academy, 1856-60; attached to brig Perry, 1861; 
capture of privateer Savannah, 1861; steam gunboat Scioto, West Gulf Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, 1862; engagements with guerillas, Galveston, Texas, July 9th, 1863. 

While temporarily in charge of the Scioto, Lieutenant Davenport went on 
shore on the coast of Texas with two boats and twelve men, crossed the island 
(three and a half miles in width,) and captured one schooner, with one hun- 
dred bales of cotton, and one sloop with thirty bales; not being able to bring 
them out on account of the low water, he burned them. In preparing to leave he 
was wounded by the accidental discharge of a rifle, the ball entering the right 
knee, and passing out at the side of the knee, fracturing his left arm, and 
rendering amputation above the elbow necessary. 

Naval Academy, 1864; frigate Sabine, 1865-6; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1866-7; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; store-ship Onward, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HORACE E. MULLAN. 

. Born in Maryland, April 8th, 1837. Appointed from Kansas, September 
25th, 1857; Naval Academy, 1857-60; attached to steamer Anacostia, Potomac 
flotilla, 1861; engagement with batteries at Acquia Creek, Va., 1861; South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; battle of Port Royal, 1861; steam- 
sloop Iroquois, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; steamer Ncreus, convoy 
service, West India Squadron. 1864; steamer Nereus, North Atlantic Block- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 161 

ading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher, 1864-5; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 
1866; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 1867; steam-sloop Pisca- 
taqua, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN WBTDMAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 27th, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; attached to steamer Flag,1861 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; 
steam-sloop Tuscarora, special service, 1863 ; steam gunboat Osceola, North 
Atlantic*Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, De- 
cember, 1864, and capture of Fort Fisher, January, 1865 ; bombardment of 
two forts on Cape Fear river, January, 1865 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil 
Squadron, 1865-5; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1867; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; steamer Nyack, South Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN F. MoG-LENSEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 28th, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; battle of Port Royal, November 7th, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, July 16th, 1862 ; Bast Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864; steamer Blingo, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; several 
engagements with the enemy ; steam-sloop Monongahela, Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-8; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; Naval 
Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDGAR C. MERRIMAN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 21st, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-60 ; resigned, 1860 ; re-entered the service as Acting- 
Master, 1861 ; mortar flotilla, 1861-3 ; bombardment of forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, April, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant U. S. Navy, July 16th, 1862 ; 
steamer Florida, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; Pacific Squadron, 
1865-6; commissioned as Lieutenant- Commander, July 25th, 1866; steamer 
Wateree, South Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal., 1868 ; 
steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; navigation 
duty, Mare Island, Cal., 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD T. BROWER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 20th, 1858 ; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; serving in Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; 
11 



162 LIETJTENANT-COMMANDEES. 

battle of Hatteras Inlet, 1861 ; battle of Port Eoyal, 1861 ; steamer South Caro- 
lina, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
August 1st, 1862 ; Bteam-sloop Housatonio, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863; prisoner of war, 1864; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned as 
Lieutenant^Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Wachusett, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1868 ; steamer Nipsic, North Atlantic Squadron^ 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEB, JOHN H. KOWLAND. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, September 21st, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; battle of Hatteras Inlet, 1861 ; battle of Port 
Royal, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 
1864 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 25th, 1866; steamer Gettysburg, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; 
steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; naval rendez- 
vous, Philadelphia, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK E. SMITH. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 24th, 1858; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861; steamer Flambeau, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; engagement with Fort McAllister; boat expedition Bull's Island, S. C, 
1863; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862; steam-sloop Ticonder- 
oga, 1864 ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher; land assault on Fort Fisher; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 
1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT -COMMANDER JAMES P. ROBERTSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania, Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 28th, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3 ; battle with Forts Hatteras and Clarke, 1861 ; battle of Port 
Royal, 1861 ; siege and reduction of Port Pulaski ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
August 1st, 1862 ; steamer Keystone State, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1866-7; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25ith, 1866; steamer Frolic, Eu- 
ropean Squadron, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIETJTENANT-COMMANDERS. 163 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES L. HUNTINGTON. 

Born in Illinois, Appointed from Illinois, Septembei* 29th, 1858 ; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61; attached to steamer Cambridge, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862; commissioned aa Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862; steam-sloop 
Monongahela, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863; siege of Port Hudson, 
and frequently under the fire of the enemy's batteries; several engagements 
with rebel batteries near Donaldsonville, La. ; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Mobile bay, August 5th, 1864; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Kansas, Brazil 
Squadron, 1866-8; League Island, Pa., 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER RUFUS K. DUBR. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, September 23d, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61; serving in South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862 ; engagements with rebel gunboats in the Savannah river in the spring of 
1862, and numerous engagements with the rebels during the same year ; steam- 
sloop Mohican, special service, 1863-4 ; steamer Shamrock, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; capture of Plymouth, N. C, October 31st, 1864 ; 
steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868 ; steam- 
sloop Narragansett, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER LOUIS KEMPFF. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, September 21st, 1857 ; Naval 
Academy, 1857-61; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2; battle of Port Royal, November 7th, 1861; in charge of a 
howitzer from the Wabash, and with the body of troops under General Stevens 
in the expedition against Port Royal Perry, January, 1862 ; expedition which 
resulted in the capture of Fernandina and Jacksonville, Florida, and St Marys, 
Ga.; commissioned as Lieutenant, Aug. 1st, 1862; West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1863; supply steamer Connecticut, 1864; steamer Suwanee, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; 
apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1868; receiving-ship Independence, Mare Island, 
Cal., 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SMITH W. NICHOLS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25th, 
1858 ; Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; 
school-ship Macedonian, 1863 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5; bombardment of Fort Fisher, December, 1864; cap- 



164 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEKS. 

ture of Fort FisTier, January, 1865 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9 ; special 
duty, Boston, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER AECHIBALD N. MITCHELL. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, September 27th, 1858 ; Naval 
Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to sloop Savannah, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2 ; Hilton Head, 1861 ; Stono river, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
August 1st, 1862 ; steamer Pocahontas, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863; 
Galveston and Texas Coast, 1863 ; steam gunboat Mattabessett, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; engagement with rebel ram Albemarle, 1864 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 j steamer Wasp, Brazil 
Squadron, 1866-8; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS J. HIGGINSON. 

BoKN in Massachusetts. Appointed from same State, September 21st, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; capture of rebel privateer Judith at Pensacola, 
Florida, 1861; bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette bat- 
teries, and capture of New Orleans, April, 1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
August 1st, 1862; steamer Vixen, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; 
steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; bombard- 
ment of Fort Sumpter; Naval Academy, 1864-5; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squad- 
ron, 1866-8; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN McFARLAND. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, September 21st, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Iroquois, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862 ; Forts Jaekson and St. Philip, and engagements attendant 
on capture of New Orleans ; both attacks on Vicksburg ; engagement with ram 
Arkansas ; attack on Grand Gulf; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 
1862 ; steam gunboat Chocura, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; 
several times under fire of Forts Fisher and Caswell ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Shamokin, Brazil Squadron, 1866-7 ; 
steamer Monooaoy, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 
1869. 



lilEUTENANT-OOMMANDEBS. 165 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER aEORGE W. SUMNER. 

Born in Michigan. Appointed from Kentucky, September 20th, 1858; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; mortar flotilla, 1862; bombardment of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip, April, 1862; Vicksburg batteries, 1862; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; 
steamer Massasoit, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer De 
Soto, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
25th, 1866; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BENJAMIN F. LAY. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 20th, 1858 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1858-61 ; attached to steamer New London, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; numerous engagements with the enemy in Mississippi 
sounds ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; steamer Saugus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
both attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Tusearora, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Conto- 
cook, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER STEPHEN A. McCARTY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 20th, 1856; 
Naval Academy, 1856-61 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Wyoming, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. TALLMAN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 24th, 1857 ; 
Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Wachusett, James river 
flotilla, 1862, and later in the same year attached to West India Squadron ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-4; engagements with the forts in Charleston harbor, November, 
1863, on the occasion of the grounding of the iron-clad Lehigh ; engagement 
with Fort Moultrie, May 16th, 1864; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil 
Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868 ; steamer Yantic, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1868-9. 



166 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEES. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES D. GRAHAM. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Illinois, September 25tli, 
1857 ; Naval Academy, 1857-61 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; 
Forts Jackson ajid St. Philip ; two attacks on Vicksburg ; James river flotilla, 
1862 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, August 1st, 1862 ; sloop Jamestown, East 
India Squadron, 1862-5 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25tli, 
1866; steamer Augusta, special service, 1866-7; steam-sloop Powbatan, flag- 
sbip South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; reoeiving-sbip Boston, 1868-9 ; steam- 
sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM R. BRIDGMAN. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa, November 29tli, 1859 ; Naval Acade- 
my, 1859-61 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; passage of Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans, April, 
1862 ; Arkansas Post, 1862 ; promoted to Ensign, September 10th, 1862 ; most 
of the naval fights about Vicksburg, ending in the capture of the city, July, 
1863; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 22d, 1864 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; 
/ommissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; steam-frigate Min- 
nesota, special service, 1868 ; steam-sloop Coctocook, flag-ship North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALEXANDER H. McCORMICK. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Texas, September 21st, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steamer Norwich, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3 ; bombardment of Port Pulaski, 1862 ; fort in Wingaw 
Bay, S. C, 1862 ; second occupation of Jacksonville, Florida, 1863 ; promoted 
to Ensign, December 22d, 1862; steam-sloop Iroquois, special service, 1864-5; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864 ; Naval Academy, 1866-9 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Lancas- 
ter, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY L. JOHNSON. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from same State, September 30th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Tuscarora, special service, 1862-3 ; promoted to Ensign, September 24th, 
1863 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, February 22d, 1864 ; steamer Nipsic, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; Naval Academy, 
1866-9; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEBS. 167 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALBERT S. BARKER. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, October 25th, 
1859 ; Naval Academy, 1859-61 j attached to steam-sloop Misaisaippi, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans, 1862 ; 
Port Hudson ; promoted to Ensign, February 22d, 1862 ; steam-frigate Niagara, 
special service, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864 ; Pacific 
Squadron, 1865-7; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MORTON W. SANDERS. 

Born in Massachusetts. AppointSd from Massachusetts, September 25th, 
1859 ; Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; engagement with rebel fleet at S. W. Pass, 
Mississippi river, October, 1861 ; promoted to Ensign, November 22d, 1862 
Mississippi Squadron, 1864 ; Red River Expedition, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, February 22d, 1864; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 
bombardment of Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; capture of Fort Fisher, January 
1865 ; Pacific Squadron, 1865-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander 
July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Juniata, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES S. COTTON. 

Born in Wisconsin. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 23d, 1858 ; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; sinking of the privateer Petrel ; battle with the 
rebel ram Merrimack, March 8th, 1862 ; promoted to Ensign, November 11th, 
1862; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, special 
service, 1863-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864 ; steam-sloop 
Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864^5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, Au- 
gust 5th, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; 
steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES F. BLAKE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, October 26th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1862-3 ; promoted to 
Ensign, June 26th, 1863; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 
1864 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



168 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEES. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN R. BARTLETT. 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from Rhode Island, November 25th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; attack on Vicksburg, 
June, 1862 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; pro- 
moted to Ensign, September 8th, 1863; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864 ; steam-sloop Sus- 
quehanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of 
Fort Fisher, December, 1864; on shore with assaulting party at capture of Fort 
Fisher, January, 1865 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, special service, 1866 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; steamer Nipsic, Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866-7; Naval Academy, 1867-9; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 
1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER OLIVER A. BATCHELLER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 25th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; promoted to Ensign, November 22d, 1862 ; steam-sloop 
Mississippi, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; attack on Port Hudson, 
March 14th and 15th, 1863 ; siege of Port Hudson ; West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Blobile bay, August 5th, 1864; siege of Fort 
Morgan; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; steamer Frolic, 
European Squadron, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 
1866; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop 
Piscataqua, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SILAS W. TERRY. 

Born in Kentucky.- Appointed from Kentucky, September 28th, 1858; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61 ; attached to sloop Dale, Atlantic Coast, 1861-2 ; 
engagement with rebels on the South Edisto river in 1862; promoted to 
Ensign, September 16th, 1862 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; Blississippi Squadron, 1864; 
Red River Expedition, 1864. 

While in temporary command of a naval transport, had an engagement with 
a rebel battery, supported by a large force of infantry. Lieutenant Terry was, 
upon recommendation of Rear Admiral Porter, advanced several numbers in his 
grade for his gallantry upon this occasion. 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battles with Forts Fisher and 
Anderson and other rebel batteries near Wilmington, N. C; was on the James 
river and present at the fall of Richmond; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1865-8; 
receiving-ship. New York, 1868-9 ; at present, on duty at Naval Academy. 



LIEUTENANT-OOMMANDERS . 169 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MERRILL MILLER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, November 28th, 1859 ; Naval Acad- 
emj^ 1859-61; attached to frigate Potomac, Atlantic Coast, 1861-2; promoted 
to Ensign, October 13th, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; battle of Ar- 
kansas Post, 1863 ; Haines' Bluff, 1863 j in charge of mortar-boats, at siege of 
Vicksburg, for twenty-three days, in 1863 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Febru- 
ary 22d, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; expedition up 
James river, 1864 j both attacks on Fort Fisher ; attached to iron-clad Monadnock 
on her passage from New York to San Francisco, 1866; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867-9 ; steam-sloop 
Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK J. NAILE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 27th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 J sinking of privateer Petrel, 1861 ; steam-sloop Oneida, Western Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862; attack on and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip and Chalmette batteries ; capture of New Orleans ; bombardment and 
passage of Vicksburg batteries twice ; promoted to Ensign, 1862 ; Mississippi 
Squadron, 1863-5 ; Red River Expedition, 1864 ; co-operation of the Mississippi 
Squadron, on the Cumberland and Tennessee, with the army under General 
Thomas, in the defeat of the rebel General Hood ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 22d, 1864; steamer Lenapee, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Penobscot, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FREDERICK PEARSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21st, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 ; sinking of privateer Petrel ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; attached to the naval howitzer battery which 
accompanied the army in the operations against the enemy's batteries on Coo- 
saw creek, S. C. ; attached to the rifle battery at the reduction of Fort Pulaski, 
at the occupation of Fernandina, Florida, and the engagement the day after 
between the Ottawa and the enemy up the St. Marys river ; attached to the navy 
howitzers at the battle of Pocotaligo ; promoted to Ensign, September 16th, 
1862; sloop Jamestown, East India Squadron, 1864-5; commanded a chartered 
steamer, and co-operated with vessels of the English, French, and Dutch fleet 
at Simonasaki, Straits of Japan, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 
22d, 1864 ; Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
July 25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8 ; 
practice-ship Macedonian, 1868-9. 



170 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEBS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD N. KELLOGG. 

BoKN in Maine. Appointed from Illinois, September 24t]i, 1858 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1858-61 ; attached to sloop Marion, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; steam gunboat 
Sonoma, West India Squadron, 1862-3 ; promoted to Ensign, September 8th, 
1863; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864 ; 
steamer Mackinaw, Atlantic Coast, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, July 25th, 1866; apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1868 ; store-ship Guard, 
European Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER RICHARD S. CHEW. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, No- 
vember 25th, 1859 ; Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-frigate 
Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; battle with rebel ram Merrimack, 
March 8th and 9th, 1862 — slightly wounded in the second day's fight; promoted 
to Ensign, December 13th, 1862; steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1864; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, Feb. 22d, 1864 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1865-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 
1866 ; at present, on duty at Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN J. READ. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, September 21st, 1858 ; 
Naval Academy, 1858-61; Atlantic Squadron, 1861; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; in all of Farragut's battles, 
from the South West Pass of the Mississippi river to Vicksburg, 1862-3 ; pro- 
moted to Ensign, November 22d, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; steamer R. R. 
Cuyler, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer De Soto, At- 
lantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 
1866 ; steamer Rhode Island, Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Susque- 
hanna, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WALTER ABBOTT. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Rhode Island, November 29th, 1859 • 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf I31ocka- 
ding Squadron, 1861-2 ; bombardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. 
Philip, Chalmette batteries, and capture of New Orleans ; promoted to Ensio-n 
November ■ 22d, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; iron-ofad 



LIEUTENANT-OOMMANDEKS. 171 

steamer New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; school-ship Sabine, 1865-6; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Sacra- 
mento, special cruise, 1867; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 
1888-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN T. WOODWARD, 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from Vermont, November 21st, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; attack on and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 
Chalmette batteries and capture of New Orleans ; two attacks on Port Hudson ; 
promoted to Ensign, November, 1862; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1863-4; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; steam-frigate Minnesota, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; two attacks on Fort Fisher; 
steam-sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 1865-6 ; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1867 ; steam-sloop Guerriere, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; steamer Kansas, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY B. RUMSEY. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, October 25th, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; 
steamer Clifton, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip and Vicksburg, capture of Galveston, October, 1862 ; Matagorda, 
Texas, November, 1862 ; re-capture of Galveston, January 1st, 1863 ; promoted 
to Ensign, February 24th, 1863 ; iron-clad steamer Roanoke, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 22d, 
1864 ; frigate New Ironsides, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
both attacks on Port Fisher; steam-sloop Monongahela, Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop 
Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. WOOD. 

Born in Ireland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 22d, 1859 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; destruc- 
tion of privateer Petrel ; steam-sloop Oneida, W. G. B. Squadron, 1862 : 
through all the operations with Admiral Farragut on the Mississippi, from the 
attack on the forts below New Orleans until the siege of Vicksburg was raised 
in 1862 ; commanded a howitzer and landing party that forced the surrender of 
Natchez, May 12th, 1862 ; promoted to Ensign, February 24th, 1863 ; steam- 
sloop Dacotah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, February 22d, 1864; iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5. 



172 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

On February 5tla, 1865, commanded a boat expedition consisting of ten boats 
and one hundred and fifty men, proceeded up Pagan creek, a tributary to the 
James, and captured a torpedo-boat and torpedo, filled, and ready for use. 

Steamer Vanderbilt, special service, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 25th, 1866; steamer Suwanee, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 j 
sloop Cyane, North Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES W. TRACY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from same State, October 27th, 1859 } 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to frigate St. Lawrence, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 ; destruction of privateer Petrel ; steam gunboat Octorara, Mississippi 
Squadron, 1862-3 ; Vicksburg, July, 1862 ; promoted to Ensign, December 
10th, 1862 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; at Charleston, 
April 1863, and other actions during the siege ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 22d, 1864 ; Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GOUVERNEUR K. HASWELL. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 25th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-frigate Roanoke, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; engagement with rebel ram Merrimack and 
Sewell's Point batteries, March, 1862 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, West India 
Squadron, 1862; promoted to Ensign, October 7th, 1862; steam-frigate Colo- 
rado, West G-ulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 22d, 1864 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; steamer Van- 
derbilt, special cruise, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, July 
25th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Saranao, Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; receiving-ship, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD E. PREBLE. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, November 29th, 1859 ; Naval 
Academy, 1859-61 ; attached to steam-sloop Mississippi, W. G. B. Squadron, 
1861 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, special service, 1862-3 ; promoted to Ensign, 
August 9, 1864; steam-sloop Susquehanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Port Fisher; commissioned as Lieutenant, Febru- 
ary 22d, 1864; steam-sloop Susquehanna, special service, 1866-7; commissioned 
as Lieutenant Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, special 
cruise, 1868 ; Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 173 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MORTIMER L. JOHNSON. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 29th, 
1859; Naval Academy, 1859-61; attached to frigate Sabine, Atlantic Coast, 
1861 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-3; battle of Port Royal, Port Royal Ferry, Fort Pulaski, 1861; St. 
Johns river, 1862; all the battles before Charleston, ia 1863; Stono river 
and James Island, 1863; promoted to Ensign, September 16th, 1862; 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, Feb- 
ruary 22d, 1864; steam-frigate Colorado, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; first attack on Fort Fisher, December, 1864 ; fall of Fort Fisher, 
January, 1865; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; fall of Mobile; 
steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned aa Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866; steamer Wateree, South Pacific Squadron, 
1868; steam-sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWIN M. SHEPPARD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 24th, 1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-61; attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; passes of the Mississippi river ; promoted to Ensign, No- 
vember, 22d, 1862 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3; siege of Port Hudson ; steam-sloop Wachusett, special service, 1864-5 ; 
capture of privateer Florida, October 7th, 1864 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 22d, 1864 ; steamer Tacony, Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, July 25th, 1866 ; steamer Osceola, Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1867; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES McGREGOR. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, September 21st, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-8 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 18G3 ; attached to steam- 
sloop Juniata, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on 
Fort Fisher and land assault; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25th, 1866; steam-sloop Powhatan, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER IRA HARRIS, Jr. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 22d, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to 
steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both at- 



174 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

tacks on Fort Fisher and assault on same ; wounded by a rifle-ball in the leg, in 
naval assault on Fort Fisher; steam-frigate Colorado, European Squadron, 
1865-7; commissioned as Lieutenant, July i25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, 
flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEK DOUGLAS R. CASSEL. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 29th, 1860; Naval Aca4- 
emy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; served in W. G B. 
Squadron, 1864 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; wounded during the 
passage of the forts in Mobile Bay ; attached to naval battery on shore during 
the bombardment of Fort Morgan, August, 1864; steam-sloop Brooklyn, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher, and naval 
assault on the same ; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Eichmond, European Squadron, 
1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEK EOBLEY D. EVANS. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Utah, September 20th, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to steam- 
sloop Powhatan, West India Squadron, 1864; North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher, January 15th, 1865; in the 
land attack on Fort Fisher received two severe wounds from rifle shots ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25th, 1866 ; ord- 
nance duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 1867 ; steam-sloop Piseataqua, flag-ship 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 
12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER G-EORGE W. COFFIN. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20th, 
1860 ; Naval Academy, 1860-8 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; steam- 
sloop Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks 
on Fort Fisher. Wounded by a minie ball in right leg at land assault on 
Fort Fisher; Steamer Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1866; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, July 25th, 1866 ; steam-frigate Franklin, European Squadron, 1867-8 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; Naval Academy 
1868-9. ^ 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY GLASS. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Illinois, September 24th, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-8; promoted to Ensign, September 8th, 1863 ; attached to steam- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 175 

sloop Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; all the 
general engagements with forts and batteries in Charleston harbor, from July 
8th to September 28th, 1863 ; engagements with batteries in Stono river, S. C, 
December 28th, 1863, and July 3d and 11th, 1864 ; engagements with batteries 
in North Edisto river, February 9th, 1865; capture of Georgetown, S. 0,, 
February 5th, 1865 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1865 ; steam-sloop 
Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, July 25th, 
1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop 
Tuscarora, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ERNEST J. DICHMAN. 

BoEN in Wisconsin. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 20th, 1860; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; Fort 
Wagner, August, 1863; Stono river, S. C, July, 1864; several engagements 
with defences of Charleston harbor, from July, 1863, to February, 1865 ; protect- 
ing working party while building battery " Swamp Angel," from an attack of the 
enemy's boats, with two launches under his command, August 1863; capture of 
Montgomery, Gra., 1864 ; various operations with torpedoes ; engaged in scout 
and picket duty at Charleston and other points on the coast ; promoted to Master, 
November 10th, 1865; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1866-8; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, May 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squad- 
ron, 1868-9 ; at present, on duty at Naval Observatory, Washington. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM W- MACLAY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 4th, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to steam-sloop 
Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort 
Fisher; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1865; steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; on duty at Naval 
Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER PHILIP H. COOPER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 28th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1800-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863; attached to 
steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; promoted to Master, November, 1865 ; steam- 
sloop Powhatan, South Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
November 10th, 1866 ; Naval Academy, 1807-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 1869. 



176 LTEUTENANT-COMMANDEKS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. TAYLOR. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Ohio, September 28th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steam- 
sloop Iroquois, special service, 1864-5 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 
1865 ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866; steam-sloop Susquehanna, flag-ship North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 
12th, 1868 ; store-ship Guard, European Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALLEN D. BROWN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 26th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863; attached to 
steam-sloop Iroquois, special service, 1863-4 ; promoted to Master, November 
10th, 1865 ; steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; steamer Unadilla, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; 
Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER MARSTON NILES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, November 25th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1860 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise, 1863-5 ; promoted to Master, November 
10th, 1865 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, March 12th, 1868; steam -sloop Contocook, flag-ship North Atlantic 
Squadron, 186S-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE H. WADLEIGH 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, September 26th, 
1860; Naval Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863; 
attached to steam-sloop Lackawanna, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 
1865; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1865-9 ; commissioned 
aa Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 177 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER A. S. CROWNINSHIELD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 21st, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both 
attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 1865-8 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, March 10th, 1868; steam-sloop Richmond, European 
Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES H. CRAVEN. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 20th, 1860; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863; serving in South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; occupation of Morris Island, July, 
1863; in command of Fifth Division at assault on Port Sumpter, September 
7th, 1863; attacks on rebel batteries in Stono river, July 3d and 7th, 1864; 
joint expedition of naval and military forces to cut Charleston and Savannah 
Railroad, August and September, 1864 ; in charge of launch from Housatonic, 
stationed inside of Morris Island, to prevent rebel communication ; while on 
this duty, captured Major Walley, of the rebel army, who was in a boat, with 
a surgeon and the crew ; made attack with the army on Forts Gregg and Wagner, 
and at the evacuation of Morris Island captured three boats with eighty men 
and officers in them ; performed duty in naval battery on Morris Island ; was 
attached to Housatonic when she was blown up, February 17th, 1864 ; steam- 
frigate Colorado, European Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
November 10th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Wampanoag, 1868 ; commisioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Powhatan, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868-9 ; store-ship Onward, South Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANK "WILDES. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 21st, 
1860 ; Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached 
to steam-sloop Lackawanna, West Grulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; Mobile 
Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; siege of Mobile, April, 1865 ; attached to iron-clad 
Monadnock, on her passage from New York to Sain Francisco, 1866 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867 ; steamer Suwanee, North Pacific Squadron, 1868; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868; receiving-ship, Boston, 1868; 
steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM W. HENDRICKSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Ohio, September 26th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; attached to 
12 



178 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

steam-sloop Brooklyn, 1864; Pacific Squadron, 1864-7; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866; apprentice-ship Portsmouth, 1867-8; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Plymouth, 
European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER AUGUSTUS G. KELLOGG. 

BoEN in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, September 21st, 1860 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1860 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to steamer Rhode 
Island, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1854 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; 
promoted to Master, November 10th, 1865; steam-sloop Shenandoah, East India 
Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; steam gunboat Aroos- 
took, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; iron-clad duty. New Orleans, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOSEPH B. COGHLAN. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Illinois, September 27th, 1860 ; Naval 
School, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to steam-frigate 
Niagara, special service, 1864-5 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1865 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Richmond, European Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES H. SANDS. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Maryland, November 22d, 
1859 ; Naval Academy, 1859-63 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; at- 
tached to steam-sloop Tusoarora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; 
steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both 
attacks on Fort Fisher ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship East India Squadron, 
1865-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Richmond, European 
Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER YATES STIRLING. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 27th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, May 28th, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; both 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 179 

attacks on Fort Fisher; steamer Mohongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Contocook, flag-ship North Atlan- 
tic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COIMMANDBR WILLIAM C. WISE. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Kentucky, September 29th, 1860; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
frigate New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^; steam- 
frigate Minnesota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; at bombard- 
ment and capture of Fort Fisher, and subsequent attacks on the rebel fortifica- 
tions on Cape Fear river up to the city of Wilmington; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1865-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 
1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; practice- 
ship Dale, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER LOUIS CLARKE. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, September 24th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; steam-sloop 
Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864 ; Mobile, April, 1865; burned by explosion of torpedo off 
Mobile Point; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1865-8 ; promoted 
to Master, May 10th, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 1st, 1867 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1868; Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER PURNELL F. HARRINGTON. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, September 20th, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to steam- 
sloop Ticonderoga, 1863 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864, and in all the operations against the rebel defences 
at entrance of Mobile Bay, during the summer of 1864; steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; promoted to Master, May 10th, 1866 ; steam- 
sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, February 21st, 1867; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868; Naval Academy, 
1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE HOFF. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 24th, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; attached to 



180 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

steam-frigate Niagara, 1864; East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer 
Shawmut, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ) promoted to Master, May 10th, 1866 ; 
steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, Fehruary 21st, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868; Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM K. WHEELER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, December 2d, 1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-63; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; attached to 
steam-sloop Iroquois, special service, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Rhode Island, flag- 
ship West India Squadron, 1865-6; promoted to Master, May 10th, 1866; 
steamer Huron, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
February 21st, 1867; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 
1868 ; steamer Kansas, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM S. DANA. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 25th, 1859; 
Naval Academy, 1859-63; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; steam- 
frigate Niagara, 1863; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5th, 1864; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 
1865-6; promoted to Master, May 10th, 1866; steamer Aroostook, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Shenandoah, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER NICOLL LUDLOW. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 28th, 1859; Na- 
val Academy, 1859-63 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Wachusett, Brazil Squadron, 1863-5; attached to iron-clad Monad- 
nock, on her passage from New York to San Francisco, in 1866 ; promoted to 
Master, November 10th, 1866; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS A. COOK. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20th 
1860 ; Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; at-' 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 181 

taohed to steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; 
steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 1865-7; promoted to Master, 
November 10th, 1866; North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868 ; Naval Academy, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER COLBY M. CHESTER. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, October 31st, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-63 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864 ; operations against Mobile ; steam-frigate Powhatan, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867 ; steamer Gettysburg, North At- 
lantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 
1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ARTHUR H. WRIGHT. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 20th, 1860 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1860-3 ; attached to West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; siege of Mobile ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European 
Squadron, 1865-8 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
March 12th, 1868; receiving-ship. New York, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES E. CLARK. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 29th, 1860 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; attached to steam- 
sloop Ossipee, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 
1864 ; bombardment of Fort Morgan ; steam-frigate Vanderbilt, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866 ; steamer Suwanee, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 
1867; receiving-ship, Portsmouth, N. H., 1868-9; commissioned as Lieuten- 
ant-Commander, March 12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES J. BARCLAY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21st, 1860 ; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; steam-sloop 



182 LIEDTENANT-COMMANDEKS. 

Wachusett, Brazil Squadron, 1863^ ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, European 
Squadron, 1865-6; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866 ; steam-frigate 
Susquehanna, special service, 1867 j commissioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 
1867 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, special service, 1868 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1869. 



LIEUTENAJSTT-COMMANDEE CHARLES V. GEIDLEY. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Michigan, September 26th, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to steam- 
sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1865-7; 
promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, February, 21st, 1867 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS MORRIS. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27th, 1860; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship West India Squadron, 1863-4 ; North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort Fisher; steam-sloop 
Monongahela, West India Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, November 
10th, 1866; steam-sloop Piscataqua, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9 ; com- 
missioned as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867 ; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES D. SIGSBEE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 27th, 1859 ; 
Naval Academy, 1859-63 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Monongahela, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay, 
August 5th, 1864 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; both attacks 
on Fort Fisher, and final assault on the same ; steam-sloop Wyoming, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, February 21st, 1867; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, March 12th, 1868 ; at present, 
on duty at Naval Academy. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM H. WHITING. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 21sfc, 1860; 
Naval Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863. Attached 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 183 

to steam-sloop Monongahela, West Gulf Squadron, 1803-5 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5th, 1864, and burning of the blockade runner " Ivanhoe," under 
the guns of Port Morgan, August 5th, 1864; surrender of Fort Gaines, Au- 
gust 8th, 1864; bombardment and surrender of Fort Morgan, August 24th, 
1864 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 1865-6 ; promoted to Master, 
November 10th, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 1866-8; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, February 2l8t, 1867; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Tioonderoga, European Squadron, 
1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER DENNIS W. MULLAN. 

BoEN in Maryland. Appointed from Kentucky, September 21st, 1860; Na- 
val Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1833 ; attached to 
steam-sloop Monongahela, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; battle of 
Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; two attacks on Fort Morgan ; steamer Mohongo, 
Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1867 ; steam- 
sloop De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as Jjieutenant, 
February 21st, 1867; Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant- 
Commander, March 12th, 1868; at present, attached to steamer Monocacy, Asi- 
atic Squadron. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE T. DAVIS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20th, 
1860 ; Naval Academy, 1860-3 ; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1868 ; at- 
tached to iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; both attacks on Fort 
Fisher, and final assault on the same; steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadron, 
1865-8; promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant, February 21st, 1867; steam-sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 
1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE D. B. GLIDDEN. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 24th, 1860 ; Naval 
Academy, 1860-3; promoted to Ensign, October 1st, 1863; attached to steam- 
sloop Seminole, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile 
Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Wyoming, East India Squadron, 1865-7; 
promoted to Master, November 10th, 1866; commissioned as Lieutenant, Feb- 
ruary 21st, 1867 ; steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1868-9 ; at present, on duty at Naval Academy. 



184 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIBUTENANT-COMMANDEE N. MAYO DYER. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, May 2d, 1862 j 
entered the Volunteer Navy as a Master's Mate, 1862 ; attached to steamer R. 
R. Cuyler, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3. 

On May 18th, 1863, at 2 A. M., Master's Mate Dyer, having under his com- 
mand the second cutter, manned by nine of the crew of the R. R. Cuyler, and 
being on picket duty close to the swash channel leading out of Mobile Bay, 
discovered a vessel close under Fort Morgan, and seeing no movement on her 
part he pulled cautiously along, trying to get in-shore of her, but ran upon a 
hawser which was run from the vessel to the fort. Concluding she was aground, 
he boarded her, taking the crew completely by surprise, and capturing her cap- 
tain with six men and all her papers. Finding it impossible to get her off, and 
seeing the rebel gunboat Gaines coming to her relief. Master's Mate Dyer re- 
moved the prisoners, papers, etc., and set fire to her. As she burned but slowly, 
he returned, knocked in the heads of two barrels of turpentine, and again fired 
her and return^ to his ship, leaving the schooner in flames. According to the 
statement of the captain of the blockade-runner, his vessel was boarded and 
burned within two hundred yards of Fort Morgan. Her cargo consisted of two 
hundred bales of cotton. 

Promoted to Acting Ensign, May 18th, 1863 ; commanding steamer Eugenie, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; promoted to Acting Master, 1864 ; 
attached to steamer Metaeomet, at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; 
promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, April 22d, 1865; special duty. Navy 
Department, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander U. S. Navy, 
December 18th, 1868; South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS M. GREEN. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, June 18th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as an Acting Master, in the Volunteer Navy, June 18, 1861 ; 
attached to sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; Passes 
of the Mississippi ; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadi'on, 1863 ; 
promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, April 21st, 1864; steam-frigate Ni- 
agara; special service, European waters, 1864; commanding steamer Louisiana, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steamer Florida, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1866; special duty. Navy Department, 1867; steam-sloop Guerriere, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, U. S. Navy, December 18th, 1868; steamer Wasp, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD HOOKER. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Rhode Island, July 19th, 1861; en- 
tered the service as Acting Master's Mate ; promoted to blaster, 1861 ; attached 
to steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; promoted to 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, September 20th, 1862 ; commanding steamer Vic- 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 185 

toria, North Atlantic BlookadiDg Squadron, 1863 ; commanding steamer Curri- 
tuck, Potomac flotilla, 1863-5 ; Naval Store-keeper, Navy Yard, New York, 
1866-7; commanding store-ship Idaho, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY H. GORRINGB. 

Born in West Indies. Appointed from New York, October 1st, 1862 ; en- 
tered the service as a Master's Mate, October 1st, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 
1862-5 ; promoted to Acting Ensign, 1863 ; promoted to Acting Master^ 1864 ; 
promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, 1865. 

Acting Lieutenant Gorringe took part in nearly all the important battles of 
the Mississippi Squadron, and was three times promoted for gallantry in battle. 

Promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commander, July 10th, 1865 ; 
commanding steamer Memphis, Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. Navy, December 18th, 1868 ; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALONZO W. MULDAUR. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 18th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as an Acting Master in the Volunteer Navy, October 18th, 
1861 ; attached to steamer Santiago de Cuba, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861-3; steamer Sassacus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; 
engagement with rebel ram Albemarle, 1864; promoted to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant, May 24th, 1864 ; steam gunboat Chicopee, Atlantic Squadron, 
1866; steam-sloop Oneida, East India Squadron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. Navy, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES O'NEIL. 

Born in England. Appointed from Massachusetts, May 1st, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Acting Master in the Volunteer Navy, May 1st, 1862 ; attached 
to steam gunboat Tioga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam 
gunboat Tioga, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; steamer Rhode 
Island, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; both attacks on Fort 
Fisher; promoted to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, May 80th, 1865 ; steamer 
Shamrock, Brazil Squadron, 1866-7 ; store-ship Guard, European Squadron, 
1868; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. Navy, December 18th, 
1868; receiving-ship, Boston, 1869. 



186 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEE/i. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEK CASPER F. GOODEICH. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Connecticut, December 9th, 1861; 
Naval Academy, 1861-4; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, 
European Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; 
sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER ALBERT G-. CALDWELL. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, December 23d, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European 
Squadron, 1865-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866; steamer Sham- 
rock, European Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 
1868 ; steamer Nipsic, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES W. KENNEDY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin, September 28th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-4 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6 ; 
promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, flag-ship 
South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
December 18th, 1868 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship 
Pacific Squadron. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BOWMAN H. McCALLA. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 30th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-4 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1865-6; steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866; steam-sloop Kearsarge, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th' 
1868 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned 
as LieutenantrCommander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRENCH E. CHADWICK. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Yirginia, September 28th, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEES. 187 

1865-6; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; promoted to 
Master, December 1st, 1866; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 
1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER SAMUEL H. BAKER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Arkansas, September 24th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861^ ; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866; steamer 
Shamokin, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 12th, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER THEODORE F. JEWELL. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, November 29th, 
1861 ; Naval Academy, 1861-4 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship, 
European Squadron, 1865-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866; steam- 
sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1867—8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, 
March 12th, 1868; Hydrographioal Oifice, Washington, 1868-9 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868 ; at present, attached to frigate 
Sabine, special cruise. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES F. SCHMITZ. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, October 19th, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 1865-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steam-sloop Piscataqua, 
flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, ] 867-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 
1868; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE W. ARMENTROUT. 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana, November 23d, 1861; Naval 
Academy, 1861-4; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 186-5-7; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866; apprentice-ship Sabine, 
1868 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Contocook, 
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, December 18th, 1868. 



188 LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER DAVID C. WOODROW. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 21st, 1861 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1861-5; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 
1865-7 ; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1867-9; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER HENRY C. WHITE. 

BoKN in Connecticut. Appointed from New York, October 16th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1865-6 ; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; store-ship Guard, European Squad- 
ron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868; commissioned as 
Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER EDWARD M. STEDMAN. 

BoEN in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 27th, 
1861 ; Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; promoted to 
Master, December 1st, 1866; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868; commissioned as 
Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1868-9; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN C. KENNETT. 

Born in Missouri. Appointed from Missouri, October 2d, 1861 ; Naval 
Academy, 1861-5; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; steamer Rhode Island, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; 
promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, North 
Atlantic, 1868 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop 
Kearsage, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Lieutenant-Com- 
mander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER WILLIAM M. FOLGER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, September 21st, 1861 ; Naval Acad- 
emy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Hartford, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; pro- 
moted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 
1868 ; steam-frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-9 ; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDEES. 189 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER BENJAMIN P. LAMBERTON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 21st, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; promoted 
to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1867-9 j commissioned 
as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1867 j commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JOHN SCHOULER. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 25th, 
1861 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7 ; 
promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 
1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; sloop Portemouth, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, 
December 18th, 1869. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER FRANCIS W. DICKINS. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Connecticut, September 20th, 1861 ; 
attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7; pro- 
moted to Master, December 1st, 1863 ; sohool-ship Sabine, 1868 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER GEORGE P. F. WILDE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 30th, 1861 ; 
Naval Academy, 1861^5 ; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 
1865-6 ; steamer Nipsic, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; promoted to Master, 
December 1st, 1866 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; 
commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; steam-sloop Contocook, flag- 
ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9; commissioned as Lieutenant- Comman- 
der, December 18th, 1868. 



LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CHARLES H. DAVIS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, November 29th, 
1861 ; Naval Academy, 1861-5 ; attached to steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship 
European Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Master, December 1st, 1866 ; South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; commissioned as Lieutenant, March 12th, 1868 ; 
steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned 
as Lieutenant-Commander, December 18th, 1868. 



190 SURGEONS. 

SURGEON WILLIAM S. W. EUSCHENBEEGER. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, August 10th, 1826 ; 
Entered the service with the rank of Assistant Surgeon; Pacific Squadron, 
1826-9 ; commissioned as Surgeon, April 4th, 1831 ; sloop Falmouth, Pacific 
Squadron, 1832-4 ; Fleet Surgeon, East India Squadron, 1836-9 ; naval ren- 
dezvous, Philadelphia, 1840-2 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1845 ; Fleet Sur- 
geon, East India Squadron, 1847-9 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1852 ; Fleet 
Surgeon, Pacific Squadron, 1854-7; Navy Yard, Boston, 1860-4; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1865-6; President Board of Examiners, 1869. 



SUEGEON WILLIAM MAXWELL WOOD. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 16th, 1829 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1830-1 ;. schooner 
Grampus, West India Squadron, 1832-3 ; special duty, 1834-7 ; commissioned 
as Surgeon, February 20th, 1888 ; steamer Poinsett, Home Squadron, 1838-42 ; 
Naval Station, Baltimore, 1843 ; Fleet Surgeon, Pacific Squadron, 1844-6 ; 
receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1847-8 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1850-1 ; 
Naval Station, Sackett's Harbor, New York, 1853-5 ; Fleet Surgeon, East India 
Squadron, 1856-8; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1859-61; Fleet Surgeon, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, during the rebellion ; receiving-ship, 
Baltimore, 1866-7 ; President of the Examining Board, 1868 ; Chief of the 
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1869. 



SURGEON JONATHAN M. FOLTZ. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Maryland, April 4th, 1831 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Potomac, Pacific Squadron, 
1832-4 ; Medical Bureau, Washington, 1885 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1836-7; 
commissioned as Surgeon, December, 8th, 1838 ; United States Naval Hospital, 
Port Mahon, 1839-40 ; frigate Earitan, Brazil Squadron, 1844-7 ; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1850; sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-4; rendezvous, 
Philadelphia, 1855-8; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1859; steam-frigate Niagara, 
1861 ; Fleet Surgeon, West Gulf Squadron, 1862-8 ; was with Admiral Farragut 
in all his battles on the Mississippi during 1862-3 ; member Board of Examiners, 
1864-6 ; President Board of Examiners, 1867 ; Fleet Surgeon, European Squad- 
ron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON EDWAED GILCHEIST. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, January 26th, 
1832 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon, attached to sloop Peacock, 
Brazil Squadron, 1833-4; Navy Yard, Boston, 1836 ; Naval Hospital, Bos- 
ton, 1837 ; Exploring Expedition, 1840 ; commissioned as Surgeon, Septem- 



SURGEONS. 191 

ber 27th, 1840 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1842-3 ; sloop Levant, Pacific 
Squadron, 1844-5 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; receiving-ship, 
Boston, 1850-1 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852 
Hospital, Chelsea, 1855-8; steam-frigate Wabash, 1861; Fleet Surgeon, Missis 
sippi flotilla, 1861-2 ; Fleet Surgeon, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 
Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1866-9. 



SURGEON JAMES C. PALMEK. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 26th, 18-34 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Brandywine, Pacific 
Squadron, 1835 ; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 1836 ; rendezvous, Balti- 
more, 1837; Exploring Expedition, 1838-42; commissioned Surgeon, October 
27th, 1841 ; sloop St. Marys, 1844-6 ; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 
1850-3 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1853-6 ; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1858-60; Naval Academy, 1861-3; Fleet Surgeon, West Gulf 
Squadron, 1863-5; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864; Naval Hospital, 
New York, 1866-9. 



SURGEON NINIAN PINKNEY. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 26th, 1834 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 
1835-7; frigate Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, 1839—40; commissioned 
as Surgeon, October 27th, 1841 ; store-ship Relief, Pacific Squadron, 1842-3 ; 
rendezvous, Baltimore, 1844-6 ; sloop Albany, Home Squadron, 1847 ; sloop 
Germantown, Home Squadron, 1848 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 
1850-1 ; Naval Academy, 1853-5 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1857-8 ; Hospital, Norfolk, 1859 ; special duty, Washington, 1860-2 ; 
Fleet Surgeon, Mississippi Squadron, 1863-5 ; special duty, 1868-9. 



SURGEON DAVID HARLAN. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 23d, 1835 
attached to sloop Peacock, East India Squadron, 1835-7 ; rendezvous, Baltimore 
1843; brig Somers, Home Squadron, 1844-5; commissioned as Surgeon 
December 6th, 1845 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1846 ; sloop Fal 
mouth. Pacific Squadron, 1849-51; receiving-ship Boston, 1852-4; steam, 
frigate Merrimack, 1855-7; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1859; sloop Cyane, 1861 
steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia! 
1864-5 ; Naval Academy, 1,867-8. 



192 BURGEONS. 

SURGEON J. DICKINSON MILLER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, December 5th, 1836; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Lexington, Pacific 
Squadron, 1838-40; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1842-3; brig Perry, Bast India 
Squadron, 1844-5; Home Squadron, 1846-7; commissioned as Surgeon, April 
25th 1847; steamer Scorpion, Home Squadron, 1847-9; Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia, 1850-2; sloop St. Louis, Mediterranean Squadron, 1852-5; ordnance 
ship Plymouth, practice cruise, 1857-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1859 ; frigate 
Potomac, 1861-2 ; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1864-6; Fleet Surgeon, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-9; at present, attached to receiving-ship, Philadelphia. 



SURGEON JOSEPH BEALE. 

BoKN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 8th, 
1837 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop John 
Adams, Bast India Squadron, 1839-41 ; brig Bainbridge, Home Squadron, 
1842-3 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1845 ; brig Boxer, Coast of Africa, 1846-8 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, April 19th, 1848 ; sloop John Adams, Coast of Africa, 
1849-51 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1852-3 ; sloop Germantown, Brazil Squadron, 
1853-7; receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1858-60; steam-sloop Susquehanna, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; Hospital, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 1863-5; 
steam-sloop, Hartford, flag-ship East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; Fleet Surgeon, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1869. 



SURGEON GEORGE MAULSBY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 7th, 1838; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Ohio, Mediterra- 
nean Squadron, 1838-41 ; brig Porpoise, Coast of Africa, 1842-3 ; brig Por- 
poise, Home Squadron, 1S45-G ; Hospital, New York, 1847-8 ; store-ship Relief, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; rendezvous, Boston, 1852; steam-frigate 
Saranac, Home Squadron, 1852-6 ; commissioned as Surgeon; April 14th, 
1852 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1857-9; steam-sloop Wyoming, 1861; special 
duty, Brooklyn, 1862 ; special duty, Washington, 1863 ; special duty, New York, 
1864; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1866-9; at present, member Board of Ex- 
aminers. 



SURGEON WILLIAM GRIER. 

Born in Ireland. Appointed from Maryland, March 7th, 1838 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Cyane, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1838-41 ; store-ship Erie, Pacific Squadron, 1842-4 ; schooner Shark, 
Pacific Squadron, 1844-6 ; Hospital, New York, 1848 ; razee Independence 



SURGEONS. 193 

Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-52 ; commissioned as Surgeon, April 14th, 1 852 ; 
Fleet Surgeon, North Pacifio Surveying Expedition, 1853—6 ; Naval Academy, 
1859 ; sloop Macedonian, 1861 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1862 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, Memphis, Tenn., 1863-5 ; special duty, Hartford, Conn., 1867 ; member 
Board of Examiners, 1868-9 ; at present, on duty at naval rendezvous, Balti- 



SURGEON J. WINTHROP TAYLOR. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Jersey, March 7th, 1838 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Erie, West India Squadron, 
1838-40; sloop Marion, West India Squadron, 1842-3 ; sloop John Adams, 
Home Squadron, 1845-8 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1850; sloop Dale, 1851-3 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, May 1st, 1852; rendezvous. New York, 1854-6; 
sloop St. Marys, 1856-9 ; steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-3; naval rendezvous, Boston, 1864-6; Fleet Surgeon, Gulf Squad- 
ron, 1866-7 ; Fleet Surgeon, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON SAMUEL JACKSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from North Carolina, June 20th, 1838 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Constitution 
1839^0 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1841-3 ; sloop Fairfield 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1844-5 ; razee Independence, flag-ship Pacific Squad 
ron, 1846-8; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1849-50; receiving-ship, Boston, 1851 
sloop Decatur, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; commissioned as Surgeon, September 
2d, 1852 ; unemployed from 1852-9 ; frigate Cumberland, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Squadron, 
1862—3 ; with Rear Admiral Farragut, iu the passage of the forts below New 
Orleans and the capture of the city, and in his operations before Vicksburg ; Na- 
val Academy, 1864 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-6 ; Fleet Surgeon, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-9 ; at present, on duty at Naval Hospital, Philadelphia. 



SURGEON JAMES McCLELLAND. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June 20th, 1838 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; frigate United States, 1839—40 ; 
schooner Enterprise, Brazil Squadron, 1842-4 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1846; store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8; Naval Asy- 
lum, Philadelphia, 1851-3 ; , commissioned as Surgeon, March 6th, 1853 ; 
sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1853-4 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes 
1855-7 ; sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn 
West Gulf Squadron, 1861 ; reinforcement of Fort Pickens ; receiving-ship 
Philadelphia, 1862-4; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron 
1865-7 ; Fleet Surgeon, South Pacifio Squadron, 1867-8; Navy Yard, Philadel 
phia, 1868-9. 
13 



194 SURGEONS. 

SUEGEON JOHN S. MESSERSMITH. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 9th, 1837 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Fairfield, Brazil 
Squadron, 1839-40 ; brig Dolphin, Home Squadron, 1842-3 ; steamer Col. 
Harney, 1845; bomb-brig iEtna, Home Squadron, 1846-8; Hospital, New 
York, 1850; store-ship Southampton, Pacific Squadron, 1850-4; commissioned 
as Surgeon, July 13th, 1853; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 
1855; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Gal., 1857-9; steam-sloop San Jacinto, 1861 ; 
sloop Constellation, Mediterranean Squadron, 1861-4 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
1866; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1867-8. 



SURGEON THOMAS M. POTTER. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, October 17th, 1839 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Vaudalia, Home 
Squadron, 1840-3 ; frigate Raritan, Brazil Squadron, 1845-6 ; sloop Yorktown, 
Coast of Africa, 1849-50 ; receiving-ship, New York, 1852-8 ; store-ship 
Relief, Home Squadron, 1853-4; commissioned as Surgeon, September 17th, 
1854; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron, 1854-8; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1859 ; frigate Santee, 1861-2 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1863-4 ; steam-frigate 
Niagara, special service, European waters, 1864-5 ; naval rendezvous. New York, 
1866-9. 



SURGEON ANDREW A. HENDERSON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 8th, 
1841 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Vincennes, 
Home Squadron, 1842-3 ; store-ship Erie, Coast of Africa, 1845 ; Pacific 
Squadron, 1846 ; sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1847-8 ; brig Perry, 
Coast of Africa, 1850-1 ; brig Dolphin, special service, 1853; Naval Asylum, 
1854-6 ; commissioned as Surgeon, March 1st, 1856 ; sloop Portsmouth, East 
India Squadron, 1857-8; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1859; steam-sloop 
Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; passage of the batteries 
of Vicksburg, July, 1862, and action with Port Hudson batteries, March, 1863 ; 
member of the Board of Examiners, 1864; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1865-7 ; 
member of the Board of Examiners, 1868 ; Fleet Surgeon, South Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON LEWIS J. WILLIAMS. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, January 25th, 1842 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon; sloop Falmouth, Home Squadron, 
1842-4 ; sloop Yorktown, Coast of Africa, 1 845-6 ; brig Washington, 1847 ; 
brig Porpoise, Coast of Africa, 1847-8; sloop Jamestown, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1849-50; Hospital, New York, 1851 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East 



SURGEONS. 195 



India Squadron, 1853-4 ; Naval Hospital, Pensacola, 1855 ; Hospital, New York, 
1856; commissioned as Surgeon, August SOth, 1856; sloop Cyane, Pacific 
Squadron, 1859-60 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1861-3 ; steam-sloop Kichmond, 
West Gulf Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1867-9. 



SURGEON MARIUS DUVALL. 

BoEN in Maryland. Appointed from Mayland, January 25th, 1842 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Constitution, Home Squad- 
ron, 1842-3 ; East India Squadron, 1844-5 ; Pacific Squadron, 1845-6 ; steam- 
frigaie Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-1 ; practice-ship Preble, 1852-4 ; Coast 
Survey, 1855 ; commissioned as Surgeon, September 12th, 1856 ; sloop James- 
town, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1861 ; iron-clad 
steamer New Ironsides; special service, 1862; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1862^; attack on Fort Sumpter, April 8th, 1864; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1865-6 ; store-ship Jamestown, 1867 ; Fleet Surgeon, South At- 
lantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON JOSEPH WILSON, 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 13th, 1843 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Savannah, Pacific 
Squadron, 1843-5; sloop Levant, Pacific Squadron, 1846; brig Bainbridge, 
Coast of Africa, 1849-50; Marine Barracks, Washington, 1851-2; store-ship 
Supply, East India Squadron, 1853-5; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1856-7; 
commissioned as Surgeon, May 23d, 1857; sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 
1857—9 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 1861 ; steamer Michigan on the lakes, 1862-4 ; 
steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 1865 ; member Board of Exami- 
ners, 1867 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia, 1868-9 ; at present. Fleet Sur- 
geon, South Atlantic Squadron. 



SURGEON CHARLES EVERSFIELD. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 29th, 1843 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Macedonian, Coast of Africa, 
1843-5 ; frigate Congress, Pacific Squadron, 1846-8 ; Naval Asylum, Philadel- 
phia, 1850 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1851-3 ; Navy 
Yard, Washington, 1854-5 ; frigate Congress, Mediterranean Squadron, 1855-7 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, August 15th, 1857 ; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1859 ; 
sloop Vandalia, 1861 ; store-ship Vermont, Port Royal, S. C., 1862-3 ; Navy 
Yard, New York, 1864-7; steam-frigate Minnesota, special service, 1868; special 
duty, Philadelphia, 1869; at present. Fleet Surgeon, European Squadron. 



196 SURGEONS. 

SURGEON ROBERT T. MACCOUN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New Jersey, October 2d, 1844; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Jamestown, Coast 
of Africa, 1844-6; frigate Ohio, Pacific Squadron, 1847-50; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1851 ; frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1852-5 ; Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1857; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Home Squadron, 1858; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, September 21st, 1858 ; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1859 ; steam- 
sloop Blississippi, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; in the attack on 
the batteries at Port Hudson, March, 1863 ; special duty, Baltimore, 1864-6 ; 
steam-sloop Susquehanna, special service, 1867 ; Fleet Surgeon, Asiatic Squad- 
ron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON HENRY O. MAYO. 



Born in New York. Appointed from New York, February 24th, 1846 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate United States, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1846-8 ; Coast Survey, 1850 ; sloop Albany, Home 
Squadron, 1850-2; Hospital, New York, 1854-5; frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1856 ; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; steamer Fulton, Brazil Squadron, 
1859; commissioned as Surgeon, January 24th, 1859; sloop Savannah, 1861 ; 
steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Squadron, 1862-3 ; flag-ship West India 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; marine rendezvous. New York, 1866-8. ^ 



SURGEON JOHN RUDENSTEIN. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 24th, 1846; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Dale, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1846-8 ; Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1849-50 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil 
Squadron, 1851 ; Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1852-3 ; brig Bainbridge, Brazil 
Squadron, 1854-7; rendezvous, Baltimore, 1858; steam-frigate Wabash, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1859; commissioned as Surgeon, August 21st, 1859 
sloop Jamestown, 1861 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, 1862 ; rendezvous, Boston 
1863 ; iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam, 
sloop Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1866 ; Fleet Surgeon, South Pacific Squad 
ronj,1867; Naval Hospital, Pensacola, 1869. 



SURGEON PHILIP LANSDALE. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, March 5th, 1847; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Onkahyes, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1848 ; frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1849-50; frigate Cumberland, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-5; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1856-9; 
sloop John Adams, 1861; commissioned as Surgeon, January 20th, 1861; 



SUKGEONS. 197 

steam-sloop Pensacola, "West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; naval ren- 
dezvous, Philadelpliia, 1866-8; Examining Board, Philadelphia, 1868-9; 
Fleet Surgeon, Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



SUKGEON WILLIAM LOWBER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 8th, 
1847 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Plymouth, 
Bast India Squadron, 1847-8 ; sloop Preble, Pacific Squadron, 1850 ; receiving- 
ship, Boston, 1852 ; frigate Savannah, Brazil Squadron, 1854-6 ; brig Perry, 
Brazil Squadron, 1858 ; steamer Westernport, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay 
Expedition, 1859 ; steam-sloop Narraganset*, 1861 ; commissioned as Surgeon, 
April 18th, 1861 ; store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864; store-ship Portsmouth, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865; 
receiving-ship, Philadelphia, 1867-9. 



SURGEON PHINEAS J. HORWITZ. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 8th, 1847 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to Home' Squadron, 1847-8 ; 
frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1850 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil 
Squadron, 1852; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854; Navy Yard, Pen- 
sacola, 1855; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1856; Coast Survey, 1857; store-ship 
Supply, Brazil Squadron, 1858-9 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, April 19th, 1861 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 
1862-5 ; Chief of Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1866-9 ; at present, on duty 
at Naval Hospital, Philadelphia. 



SURGEON CHARLES MARTIN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 5th, 1848 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Albany, Home 
Squadron, 1848-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851; frigate Congress, Brazil Squadron, 
1852-3 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1855 ; Coast Survey, 1856 ; steam-frigate Mis- 
sissippi, East India Squadron, 1858 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East India Squad- 
ron, 1859; receiving-ship, Boston, 1861; steam-sloop Sacramento, 1861-3; 
commissioned as Surgeon, April 22d, 1861; steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864; steam-sloop Mohican, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1865 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1867-8; Fleet Surgeon, North Atlan- 
tic Squadron, 1869. 



SURGEON PRANCIS M. GUNNELL. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, March 
29th, 1849 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Fal- 



198 STJKGEONS. 

mouth, Pacific Squadron, 1849-51 ; store-ship Supply, Pacific Squadron, 1852 ; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1853 ; frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1855-7 ; 
receiving-ship, New York, 1859 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Surgeon, April 23d, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Sacramento, 1863 ; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop 
Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 1866-8 ; Naval Hospital, Washington, 1869. 



SUKGEON JAMES SUDDARDS. 

Born in England. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 17th, 1849 j entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop John Adams, Coast of 
Africa, 1849-50 ; store-ship Lexington, Pacific Squadron, 1852-3 ; Coast Sur- 
vey, 1854-5; receiving-ship, Boston, 1857; Coast Survey, 1858-9 ; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, April 24th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Canandaigua, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1866 ; 
special duty, Philadelphia, 1867 ; steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 
1868-9. 



SURGEON EDWARD SHIPPEN. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 7th, 1849 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Marion, East India 
Squadron, 1849-52; receiving-ship, Boston, 1853; brig Dolphin, Coast of 
Africa, 1856-7 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1859 ; steamer Caledonia, Brazil 
Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859; frigate Congress, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; was on the Congress when attacked by the rebel 
ram Merrimack, and was wounded ; commissioned as Surgeon, April 26th, 1861 ; 
receiving-ship, New York, 1862-4; frigate New Ironsides, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1864-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-8; 
Naval Academy, 1869. 



SURGEON SAMUEL F. COUES. 



Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, February 25th 
1851; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Portsmouth' 
Pacific Squadron, 1852-5; Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1857; Laboratory, New 
york, 1858-9; steamer Saginaw, 1861; commissioned as Surgeon, April 26th 
1861 ; steam-sloop Housatonio, West Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Housa- 
tonic South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1864-5;, Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1866-8 : steam-sloop Rich- 
mond, European Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON JACOB S. DUNGAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 25th 1851 ■ 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Vixen,' Home 



SURGEONS. 199 

Squadron, 1852 ; Coast Survey, 1853 ; steamer Pulton, Home Squadron, 1854-5 
Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1857-8 ; Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; receiving-ship 
Philadelphia, 1861; sloop Portsmouth, West Gulf Squadrop, 1861-4; com 
missioned as Surgeon, May 1st, 1861; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1865 
Naval Academy, 1866; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1867-8; steamer Ossipee, Pacific 
Squadron, 1869. 



SURGEON GEORGE PECK. 

BoEN in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, February 25th, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Cyane, Home 
Squadron, 1851^; rendezvous. New York, 1855 ; frigate St. Lawrence, Brazil 
Squadron, 1857-9; steam-sloop Seminole, 1861; marine rendezvous, New 
York, 1861-4; commissioned as Surgeon, May 30th, 1861; steam-sloop Dicta^ 
tor. North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; steamer Vanderbilt, Pacific Squadron, 
1866; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1868 ; frigate Sabine, special cruise, 1869. 



SURGEON JOHN M. BROWNE. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, March 26th, 
1853 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; store-ship, San Francisco, Cal., 
1853-5; Coast Survey, 1856; Hospital, Norfolk, 1859; sloop Constellation, 
1861; commissioned as Surgeon, June 19th, 1861; steam-sloop Kearsarge; 
special service, 1862-4 ; in fight with privateer Alabama, in June, 1864 ; tem- 
porary duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1865; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal., 
1866-8. 



SURGEON THOMAS J. TURNER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 16th, 
1853 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to Pacific Squadron, 
1854-5; frigate Independence, Pacific Squadron, 1856; sloop John Adams, 
Pacific Squadron, 1857-8; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1859; Laboratory, New 
York, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Surgeon, June 20th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Hospital, Pensacola, 1864-5 ; special 
duty, Philadelphia, 1866; member Board of Examiners, 1867; Recorder Board 
of Examiners, 1868-9 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Juniata, European 
Squadron. 



SURGEON JOHN Y. TAYLOR. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Delaware, September 26th, 1853 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Decatur, Pacific 



200 SURGEONS. 

Squadron, 1853-7 ; rendezvous, Philadelpliia, 1858; sloop Preble, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1859; brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron, 1860; Naval Hospital, New Yorij, 
1861; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861^; in en- 
gagement with tbe rebel batteries at Vicksburg, June, 1862 ; commissioned as 
Surgeon, August 1st, 1861; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1865 ; Becorder Examining Board, Philadelphia, 1866 ; Naval Hos- 
pital, New York, 1867-8; steam-sloop Plymouth, European Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON WILLIAM T. HORD. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, November 1st, 1854 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-frigate Saranac, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1856 ; store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1857 ; Coast 
Survey, 1858 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; commissioned 
as Surgeon, August 1st, 1861 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1862 ; steam-sloop Paw- 
nee, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Station, Mound City, 
Illinois, 1865; steam-sloop Monongahela, West India Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy 
Yard, Norfolk, 1868-9. 



SURGEON JOHN S. KITCHEN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 1st, 1855 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop St. Louis, Coast of 
Africa, 1855-8 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; pro- 
moted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1859 ; commissioned as Surgeon, August 
1st, 1861 ; steamer Pocahontas, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; steam- 
frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; 
steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise, 1864-5 ; Naval Hospital, Port Royal, 
S. C, 1866; naval rendezvous, Boston, Massachusetts, 1867-8; receiving-ship, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1868-9 ; iron-clad Dictator, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1869. 



SURGEON ALBERT L. GIHON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointedfrom Pennsylvania, May 1st, 1855 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Levant, East India Squad- 
ron, 1855-8; brig Dolphin, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9; 
promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon, 1859 ; commissioned as Surgeon, August 
1st, 1861; sloop St. Louis, special service, 1862-5; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
N. H., 1866-7 ; store-ship Idaho, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON EDWIN R. DENBY. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, July 11th, 1855 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-frigate Merrimack, special 



SURGEONS. 201 

cruise, 1855-7 j steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1858 ; steamer Atlanta, 
Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Daootah, West 
India Squadron, 1861; commissioned as Surgeon, August 1st, 1861; steam- 
sloop Wyoming, East India Squadron, 1862-4 ; naval rendezvous. New York, 
1865 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1866 ; Recorder Medical Board, Philadel- 
phia, 1867 ; steam-sloop Saranao, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; sloop James- 
town, Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



SUEGEON WILLIAM R. JOHNSON, Ja. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, September 3d, 1855 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to frigate Potomac, Home 
Squadron, 1855-6; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8; steamer 
Atlanta, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1859 ; brig Bainbridge, 
1861 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1861-4 ; commissioned as Surgeon, Au- 
gust 1st, 1861; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1865; steamer Bienville, 1866; 
steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8. 



SURGEON RICHARD C. DEAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New Jersey, April 17th, 1856; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Dale, Coast of 
Africa, 1857-9 ; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1860 ; steam-sloop Wyan- 
dotte, 1861 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, special service, 1861—3 ; commissioned as 
Surgeon, August 1st, 1861 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; Naval Academy, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, special 
service, 1867; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1868-9. 



SURGEON PHILIP S. WALES. 



Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, August 7th, 1856 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Naval Academy, 1857; steam- 
frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; steamer Water Witch, 
1861; commissioned as Surgeon, October 12th, 1861; Naval Hospital, Nor- 
folk, 1863 ; steamer Fort Jackson, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; 
steamer Fort Jackson, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; Examining 
Board, 1868 ; sloop Portsmouth, South Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON ALBERT C. 60RGAS. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 30th, 1856 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Germantown, East 



202 SUEC3E0NS. 



India Squadron, 1858-60 ; steamer Crusader, Home Squadron, 1861 ; commisi 
sioned as Surgeon, October 13th, 1861 ; sloop Vandalia, South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1864 ; steam-sloop Juniata, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Juniata, Brazil Squad- 
ron, 1866; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1868-9. 



SUEaEON DBLAVAN BLOODGOOD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, March 13th, 1857 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-frigate Merrimack, 
Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; steamer Mohawk, 1861 ; commissioned as Surgeon, 
January 24th, 1862; steam-sloop Dacotah, West India Squadron, 1862; steam- 
sloop Dacotah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1868—4 ; steamer Michi- 
gan, on the lakes, 1865-6; receiving-ship. New York, 1867; sloop Jamestown, 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1868-9 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1869. 



SURGEON THOMAS WALTER LEACH. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, July 29th, 
1858 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop 
Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-61 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1862 ; com- 
missioned as Surgeon, May 22d, 1862 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863, and West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864^5 ; 
Naval Hospital, New York, 1806 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squadron, 
1867-9. 



SURGEON WILLIAM M. KING. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 3d, 1858 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; temporary duty. Navy Yard, Pensa- 
cola, 1859; attached to sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1860; store-ship 
Supply, 1861; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; 
commissioned as Surgeon, May 22d, 1862 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; steam-sloop 
Wachusett, East India Squadron, 1865-6 ; member Examining Board, 1868. 



SURGEON BENJAMIN P. GIBBS. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 12th, 1858 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Memphis, Brazil 
Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; sloop John Adams, East India 
Squadron, 1860-1; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 



STJEGEONS. 203 

1863; steamer Ossipee, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; scLool-ship 
Sabine, 1866 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. 



SURGEON DAVID KINDLEBERGER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, May 20th, 1859 ; entered the service 
as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop San Jacinto, 1860-1 ; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, August 14th, 1862 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1862 ; steam- 
sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863, and West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1866-7. 



SURGEON WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

BoEN in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, July 3d, 1859 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Savannah, Home Squadron, 
1859-60 ; sloop St. Marys, 1861 ; commissioned as Surgeon, September 5th, 
1862 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; 
receiving-ship, Boston, 1864-5 ; iron-clad Miantonomah, European Squadron, 
1867 ; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1869. 



SURGEON JAMES McMASTER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 8th, 1859 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-frigate Niagara, 
special service, 1861 ; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1863 ; commissioned as 
Surgeon, October 11th, 1862; steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864, and South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 : iron- 
clad Miantonomah, European Squadron, 1866; receiving-ship, New York, 1868; 
at present, attached to practice-ship Savannah. 



SURGEON JOHN J. GIBSON. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Illinois, July 4th, 1860; entered the service as 
Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1860-3 ; 
steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864; steam-sloop 
Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 
1866-7; steamer De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; steam-sloop Seminole, 
Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



204 SUKGEONS. 

SUKaEON CHRIS. J. CLEBORNB. 

Born in Scotland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, May 9, 1861; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-gunboat Aroostook, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; commissioned as Surgeon, November 24th, 
1863 ; naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1864 ; steam-sloop, Ticonderoga, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865; steamer Rhode Island, flag-ship West 
India Squadron, 1866 ; apprentice-ship Saratoga, 1868-9. 



SURGEON JOHN C. SPEAR. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, May 9th, 1861 ; entered tho 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Mahaska, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864 ; commissioned 
as Surgeon, June 24th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1865; steamer Swatara, West India Squadron, 1866, and European 
Squadron, 1867-8; naval rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1869. 



SURGEON CHARLES H. BURBANK. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, May 9th, 1861 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to Naval Hospital, Pilot Town, Mississippi, 
1861-2 ; school-ship Marion, 1863 ; steam-sloop Housatonic, 1864 ; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, August 24th, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1865; receiving-ship, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7; steam-sloop Kearsarge, 
Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



SURGEON HENRY C. NELSON. » 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 9th, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-sloop Susquehanna, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; Naval Hospital, New York, 1864; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, October 25th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1865-7; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1868 ; steamer Michigan, on the 
lakes, 1868-9 ; at present, attached to apprentice-ship Macedonian. 



SURGEON SOMERSET ROBINSON. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, May 9th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat Katahdin' 
West Gulf Squadron, 1861-3; Navy Yard, New York, 1864; commissioned as 



SUBGEONS. 205 

Surgeon, December 18tli, 1864; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1865-6; 
steam-sloop Saranac, North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 
1868-9 ; at present, under orders to steamer Monooacy, Asiatic Squadron. 



SURGEON ARCHIBALD 0. RHOADES. 

BoEN in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, July 30th, 1861; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steamer Pocahontas, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; Naval Hospital, New York, 1864; com- 
missioned as Surgeon, March 19th, 1865 ; steamer Bienville, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1865; steam-sloop Shenandoah, East India Squadron, 1866-9. 



SURGEON MICHAEL BRADLEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, July 30th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Louisiana, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; Mississippi Squadron, 1864-5 ; com- 
missioned as Surgeon, June 12th, 1865 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes^ 
1867-8 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



SURGEON ADRIAN HUDSON. 



Born in Canada. Appointed from New York, July 30th, 1861; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to Mississippi flotilla, 1862; steam gun- 
boat Eastport, Mississippi Squadron, 1863 ; apprentice-ship Sabine, 1864-5 ; com- 
missioned as Surgeon, June 12th, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-7; Mound City, Illinois, 1868-9. 



SURGEON NEWTON L. BATES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat Seneca, South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1863-7 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, September 16th, 1865 ; apprentice-ship, Portsmouth, 
1868 ; steam-sloop Swatara, European Squadron, 1869. 



SURGEON JAMES A. TINKHAM. 

BoRNin New York. Appointed from New York, July 30th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam-gunboat Kanawha, West 



206 SURGEONS. 

Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; receiving-ship, Boston, 1864; North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 j commissioned as Surgeon, December 5th, 
1865 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1866-7 ; steamer 
Frolic, European Squadron, 1868 ; steam-sloop Canandaigna, European Squad- 
ron, 1869; at present, Recorder Board of Examiners. 



SUEGEON STEPHEN D. KENNEDY. 

BoEN in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, May 9th, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Preble, West Gulf Squadron, 
1861-3 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1864 ; resigned, 1865 ; re-appointed, January 
5th, 1866 ; commissioned as Surgeon, January 5th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Lacka- 
wanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; special duty. New York, 1869. 



SURGEON FREDERICK E. POTTER. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, July BOtli^ 
1861 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Monti- 
cello, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 
1863 ; steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1864-6 ; commissioned as 
Surgeon, April 6th, 1866; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 
1867 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Mohican, Pacific Squadron. 



SURGEON EDWARD S. BOGERT. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat Cayuga, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; Naval Hospital, New York, 1864 ; steam- 
frigate Niagara, special service, 1864; Naval Hospital, New Briton, 1866 ; com- 
missioned as Surgeon, April 7th, 1866 ; Naval Laboratory, New York, 1867-9. 



SURGEON WALTER K. SCHOFIELD. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut, July 30tli, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat Sagamore, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; steamer Union, East Gulf Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1864; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 1865-6; steamer Augusta, 
European Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Surgeon, June 19th, 1866 ; 
naval rendezvous, Boston, 1868 ; sloop Saratoga, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



SURGEONS. 207 

SURGEON AARON S. OBERLY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Connecticut, July 30th, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat Kineo, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; Naval Academy, 1864 ; steamer Santiago 
de Cuba, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Naval Station, Mound 
City, 111., 1866-8 ; commissioned as Surgeon, June 19th, 1866 ; steam-sloop 
Narragansett, 1869. 



SURGEON GROVE S. BEARDSLEY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 30th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific 
Squadron, 1861-4; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; steam-sloop Brook- 
lyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1866, and South Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, July 25th, 1866 j receiving-ship Independence, San 
Francisco, 1868-9. 



SURGEON JAMES S. KNIGHT. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, July 30th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; Naval Asylum, Philadelphia, 1864; Mississippi 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; Naval Station, Mound City, 111., 1866 ; commissioned as Sur- 
geon, July 29th, 1866; steam-sloop Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; 
at present, attached to receiving-ship, Boston. 



SURGEON HENRY M. WELLS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, July 30th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to sloop Portsmouth, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; receiving-ship, Boston, 1864; iron-clad 
Onondaga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865; steamer Shamokin, 
Brazil Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Surgeon, October 9th, 1866 ; Naval 
Hospital, New York, 1869. 



SURGEON EDWARD S. MATTHEWS. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from District of Columbia, July 30th, 
1861 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steamer Hatteras, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag -ship 
Pacific Squadron, 1864; East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 j Pacific Squad- 



208 SUEQEONS. 

ron, 1866; commissioned as Surgeon, July 25th, 1866; store-ship Fredonia, 
Callao, 1867; steam-sloop Saranao, North Pacific Squadron, 1868; naval ren- 
dezvous, Boston, 1869. 



SURGEON JOHN H. CLAEK. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, Octoher 19th, ' 
1861; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1861^; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1865; steamer Mo- 
hongo, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as Surgeon, May 14th, 1867; 
receiving-ship, Portsmouth, N. H., 1868-9. 



SURGEON ADOLPH A. HOEHLING. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 14th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to mortar flotilla, 1861-3; 
steam-frigate Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; Naval 
Asylum, Philadelphia, 1865; steam-sloop Dacotah, Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; 
commissioned as Surgeon, Octoher 2d, 1867 ; Retiring Board, Philadelphia, 
1868-9 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1869. 



SURGEON BENJAMIN H. KIDDER. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 20th, 
1861; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat 
Marblehead, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steam-frigate Colo- 
rado, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; steamer De Soto, special ser- 
vice, 1866, and North Atlantic Squadron, 1867; commissioned as Surgeon, 
March 2d, 1868 ; special duty, Boston, 1869. 



SURGEON NEWTON H. ADAMS. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, November 29th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to frigate Santee, 1862 ; store- 
ship Potomac, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; Naval Hospital, Nor- 
folk, 1864-5; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8; commis- 
sioned as Surgeon, April 26th, 1868; steamer Mohongo, North Pacific Squadron, 
lobo— 9. 



PAYMASTERS. 209 

SUEGEON WILLIAM K. VAN KEYPEN. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 29th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to Naval Hospital, New 
York, 1862; frigate St. Lawrence, Bast Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; 
steamer Lenapee, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1868; steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 1868-9; special 
duty. New Orleans, 1869. 



SURGEON THOMAS C. WALTON. 

Born in England. Appointed from New York, October Sth, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to sloop Jamestown, East India 
Squadron, 1862-5; receiving-ship, Boston, 1866-7; steamer Suwanee, North 
Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; commissioned as Surgeon, October 22d, 1868 ; steamer 
Kesaca, Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



SUEGEON THBOEON WOOLVEETON. 

Born in Canada. Appointed from Pennsylvania, July 17th, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Surgeon; attached to steam -frigate Wabash, South 
Atlantic Blockading Sqiiadron, 1863 ; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 1864 ; 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, 1866 ; 
steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Surgeon, No- 
vember 23d, 1868. 



SUEGEON THOMAS HILAND. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire, November 
22d, 1861 ; entered the service as Assistant Surgeon ; attached to steam gunboat 
Sonoma, West India Squadron,, 1862-3 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadroq, 
1864-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-8 ; steamer Swa- 
tara, European Squadron, 1868-9 ; commissioned as Surgeon, November 24th, 
1868 ; at present, on duty at Quarantine Hospital, Portsmouth, N. H. 



PAYMASTEE EDWAED T. DUNN. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, Febru- 
ary 21st, 1831 ; attached to sloop John Adams, Mediterranean Squadron, 1833-4 ; 
schooner Boxer, Pacific Squadron, 1835; sloop Vincennes, Pacific Squadron, 
1836 ; frigate Macedonian, West India Squadron, 1837-40 ; receiving-ship, 
Norfolk, 1845; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 1846, and in the 
Pacific Squadron during the Mexican war ; Navy Yard, New York, 1850-1 ; 
14 



210 PATMASTEES. 



frigate Columbia, Home Squadron, 1852-5; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1857-60; 
sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1861-3 ; Fleet Paymaster, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; Paymaster at Baltimore, 1866-9. 



PAYMASTER JOHN B. RITTENHOUSE. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Alabama, July 21st, 1840; 
attached to brig Oregon, survey of Tampa Bay, etc., 1840-3 ; sloop Levant, 
Pacific Squadron, 1844-7; Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1848-50; sloop Albany, 
Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1852-3 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1854-6 ; steam-frigate, Susquehanna, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1856-8 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1859-60 ; special duty, 1861 ; 
Inspector, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1862-4 ; Fleet Paymaster, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1864-6; Inspector of Provisions, Boston, 1867—9. 



PAYMASTER HORACE M. HEISKEL. 

BoKN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 13tli, 
1841 ; attached to brig Somers, special service, 1842^ ; sloop Falmouth, 
Home Squadron, 1844-6 ; sloop Jamestown, Coast of Africa, 1847-50 ; Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1851-4; frigate Potomac, Home Squadron, 1854-6; 
sloop G-ermantown, East India Squadron, 1857-60 ; frigate Constitution, school- 
ship, Naval Academy, 1861 ; Naval Academy, 1862-4 ; Fleet Paymaster, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Inspector of Provisions, Phila- 
delphia, 1867-8 ; Paymaster at Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE F. CUTTER. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, June 5th, 1844 ; 
attached to brig Truxton, Coast of Africa, 1844-5 ; sloop Albany, Home Squad- 
ron, 1846-50 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1850-4 ; steamer Massachusetts, Pacific 
Squadron, 1854-7; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1858-60 ; steam-sloop 
Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1863 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-7 ; Fleet Pay- 
master, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER JAMES H. WATMOUGH. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 12th, 1844 ; 
attached to sloop Portsmouth, Pacific Squadron, 1844-8 ; brig Perry, Coast of 



PATMASTEES. 211 

Africa, 1849-51 ; frigate Constitution, Coast of Africa, 1852-5 ; steamer Michi- 
gan, on the lakes, 1857-9 ; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1861-3 ; eteam-fri^te 
Niagara, special service, 1863-4 ; Fleet Paymaster, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866-8 ; Inspector, etc.. Navy 
Yard, New York, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JOHN 0. BRADFORD. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 14th, 1845 j at- 
tached to sloop Saratoga, 1845-6 ; sloop Germantown, Home Squadron, 1846-8; 
sloop Portsmouth, Coast of Africa, 1849-51; Navy Yard, Boston, 1854-5 ; 
steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-8 ; receiving-ship, Bos- 
ton , 1860-1 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1862 ; West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; 
Fleet Paymaster, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; Inspector of 
Provisions, etc.. New York, 1865-7 ; Fleet Paymaster, European Squadron, 
1867-9 ; Paymaster at New York, 1869. 



PAYMASTER J. GEORGE HARRIS. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Tennessee, August 19th, 1845 ; Navy 
Yard, Memphis, 1845-6; attached to sloop Decatur, Coast of Africa, 1846-9; 
sloop Saratoga, East India Squadron, 1851-4; Navy Yard, New York, 1855-7; 
steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1861 ; frigate Sabine, Atlantic Coast, 1861-3 ; special 
duty. New York, 1865 ; Fleet Paymaster, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1865-8 ; Inspector of Provisions, Boston, 1869. 



PAYMASTER EDWARD C. DORAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Indiana, September 15th, 1845 ; 
attached to brig Dolphin, Coast of Africa, 1845-6 ; sloop Marion, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1846-8 ; sloop John Adams, Coast of Africa, 1849-50 ; sloop Ply- 
mouth, East India Squadron, 1852-5 ; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1856 ; steam- 
frigate Roanoke, flag-ship Home Squadron, 1858-9 ; special duty, 1861 ; Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, Cal., 1864-7 ; Paymaster at San Francisco, 1868 ; Fleet 
Paymaster, North Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JOSEPH C. BLDREDGE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Texas, February 2d, 1847 ; attached 
to brig Perry, Coast of Brazil, 1847-9 ; brig Porpoise, Coast of Africa, 1850-2 ; 
steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1853-6 ; Inspector, etc., New 



212 PAYMASTERS. 



York, 1858-61; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1862^; 
special duty, New York, 1865 ; Paymaster at New York, 1866-9. 



PAYMASTER JOHN S. GULICK. 



Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, February 1st, 1851 ; 
attached to sloop Jamestown, Brazil Squadron, 1851-4 ; special duty, Washing- 
ton, 1855 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; steam- frigate Wabash, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; Navy Yard, Washing- 
ton, 1863; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1864; Fleet Paymaster, Mississippi 
Squadron, 1864-5; Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 1867-8 ; 
Fleet Paymaster, European Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTER W. BRENTON BOGaS. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, November 30th, 1852 ; 
attached to sloop Vincennes, North Pacific Expedition, 1852-6 ; special duty, 
Washington, 1857 ; ordnance-ship Plymouth, 1858-9; steam-sloop Wyoming, 
1861; special duty, Washington, 1862; special duty, Mississippi Squadron, 
18^3-4; Navy .Yard, Washington, 1866-9. 



PAYMASTER WILLIAM G. MARCY. 

Born in New York. Appointed from California, April 1st, 1853 ; attached 
to steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1853-6 ; sloop Cumberland, flag-ship 
African Squadron, 1857-9 ; receiving-ship. New York, 1860^ ; iron-clad Dic- 
tator. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864—5 ; steam-sloop Madawaska, 
1867; Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1867-9. 



PAYMASTER THOMAS H. LOOKER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, August 31st, 1853 ; attached to brig 
Bainbridge, Brazil Squadron, 1853-6 ; sloop Portsmouth, East India Squadron, 
1856-8; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-60; steam-sloop 
Brooklyn, Atlantic Squadron, 1861 ; store-ship Brandywine, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1864; steam-sloop 
Powhatan, South Pacific Squadron, 1866; Fleet Paymaster, South Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; Paymaster at Baltimore, 1869. 



PAYMASTERS. 213 

PAYMASTER CALEB J. EMERY. 

BoKN ia Maine. Appointed from New Hampshire, April IStli, 1855; 
attached to store-ship Relief, Brazil Squadron, 1855-6 ; sloop Levant, East 
India Squadron, 1857-8 ; sloop Saratoga, Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; steam- 
sloop Narragansett, 1861-2 j store-ship Brandywine, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1864-5 ; Fleet Paymaster, 
Asiatic Squadron, 1867-8 ; Storekeeper, Asiatic Squadron, 1869, 



PAYMASTER CHARLES W. ABBOT. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 2d, 1856 ; 
attached to sloop Falmouth, Brazil Squadron, 1856-8 ; frigate St. Lawrence, 
Brazil Squadron, 1859 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; steam-sloop 
Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; special duty, New York, 
1864 ; Naval Academy, 1865-7 ; Fleet Paymaster, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1867-8 ; Paymaster at Boston, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM. 

Born in South Carolina. Appointed from South Carolina, March 13th, 
1857 ; attached to sloop Dale, Coast of Africa, 1857-9 ; sloop Macedonian, 
Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Inspector, etc., Navy Yard, Washington, 1864-5 ; 
steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER CALVIN C. JACKSON. 

Born in New York. Appointed. from Michigan, July 17th, 1857 ; attached 
to sloop Vandalia, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8 ; steamer Memphis, Brazil Squad- 
ron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Dacotah, East India Squad- 
ron, 1859-61 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1862-3 ; special duty, Missis- 
sippi Squadron, 1864-5: Paymaster at Washington, 1866-8; Naval Academy, 
1869. 



PAYMASTER ROBERT H. CLARK. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, July 18th, 1857 ; attached 
to steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; Naval Station, Pensaoola, Florida, 1863-5; 
Paymaster, Boston, 1866-8 ; Fleet Paymaster, South Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



214 PAYMASTERS. 

PAYMASTEK JAMES D. MUKRAT. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Minnesota, June 3d, 1858 ; attached to 
sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; frigate Potomac, Atlantic Coast, 1861 ; 
store-ship Potomac, West Gulf Squadron, 1862 ; iron-clad Roanoke, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1863^ ; receiving-ship and Naval Asylum, Phila- 
delphia, 1865-7 ; Fleet Paymaster, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER JAMES FULTON. 

Born in Tennessee. Appointed from Tennessee, November 20th, 1858 ; at- 
tached to steamer Saginaw, Pacific Squadron, 1860-1 ; steam-sloop Adirondack, 
Blockading Squadron, 1862; steam-sloop Lackavranna, West G-ulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-4 ; Navy Yard, Washington, 1865-6 ; member Board of Ex- 
aminers, 1867 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8 ; Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER JAMES N. CARPENTER. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Kentucky, September 13th, 1860 ; at- 
tached to sloop Saratoga, coast of Africa, 1860-2 ; Potomac flotilla, 1863-5 ; 
steamer Rhode Island, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6; Fleet Paymaster, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
1868-9. 



PAYMASTER ALEXANDER W. RUSSELL. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from District of Columbia, February 28th, 
1861; attached to iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, special service, 1862, and 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1803-4; receiving-ship North Carolina, 
New York, 1865 ; steam-sloop Sacramento, special service, and North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867 ; Inspector of Provisions, &c., Washington, 1808-9. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE LEONARD DAVIS. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Wisconsin, April 16th, 1861 ; 
attached to steam-sloop Pensacola,"West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; 
receiving-ship, Cairo, Illinois, 1865; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-7 ; Fleet Paymaster, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTERS. 215 

PAYMASTER AUGUSTUS J. GILMAN. 

BoEN in New Hampshire. Appointed from Maine, June 1st, 1861 ; attached 
to sloop Marion, Atlantic Coast, 1861 j frigate '■Santee, 1862 ; special duty, 
Cairo, 111., 1863-5 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1866-7 ; la- 
speotor of Provisions, eto., Washington, 1867-8 j Fleet Paymaster, Asiatic 
Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTER WASHINGTON IRVING. 
* 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from New York, June 1st, 1861 ; attaohed.to 
steam-sloop Susquehanna, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; frigate' 
St. Lawrence, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; store-ship Brandywine, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
1864-5 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8. 



PAYMASTER RUPUS C. SPAULDING. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, June 1st, 1861 ; attached to sloop 
Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 
1863-4; Inspector, etc.. Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1865; Naval Station, Mound 
City, 111., 1866; school-ship Sabine, 1867-8; in charge of stores, Panama, 
1869. 



PAYMASTER CUTHBERT P. WALLACH. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, June 
1st, 1861 ; attached to sloop Preble, Atlantic Coast, 1861-2 ; steam-sloop Mis- 
sissippi, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam-sloop, Powhatan, flag- 
ship West India Squadron, 1864 ; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1867-8 ; 
receiving-ship, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES H. ELDRIDGE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New York, July 10th, 1861; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Canandai- 
gua. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; promoted to Paymaster, 
February 6th, 1862 ; special duty. Navy Yard, New York, 1866; Navy Yard 
and Station, Pensacola, Fla., 1867-8; Storekeeper, Asiatic Squadron, 1869. 



216 PAYMASTERS. 

PAYMASTER GILBERT E. THORNTON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 6tli, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; store-ship Brandywine, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 1864-5; Inspector 
of Provisions, etc., Norfolk, 1866-7; Storekeeper, Naval Academy, 1868-9; 
Fleet Paymaster, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTER EDWARD FOSTER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 23d, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to store-ship Supply, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; promoted to Paymaster, February 6th, 
18G2 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; steam- 
sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; receiving-ship, New York, 
1S68-9. 



PAYMASTER EDWARD MAY. 



Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, September 6th, 
1861; entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam gunboat 
Unadilla, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; promoted to Paymaster, 
February 6th, 1862 ; Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4 ; special duty, Washington, 
1865-6 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-9 ; Navy Yard, 
Boston, 1869. 



PAYMASTER HENRY M. DENNISTON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 9th, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant P.iymastcr ; attached to steam gunboat Winona, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; promoted to Paymaster, April 14th, 
1862 ; steamer Blaokstone, 1863 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; store-ship Onward, Brazil Squadron, 1866 ; in 
charge of stores in Rio Janeiro, 1867-8; steamer Blichigan, on the lakes, 1869. 



PAYMASTER RICHARD WASHINGTON. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, August 21st, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop Daeotah, 
West India Squadron, 1862, and North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; 
promoted to Paymaster, April 14th, 1862; Naval Station, Norfolk, 18G5-7 ; re- 
ceiving-ship, Norfolk, 1868-D ; steam-sloop Guerrlere, South Atlantic Squadron, 
1869. 



PAYMASTERS. 217 

PAYMASTER CHARLES W. HASSLER. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, August 29th, 1861 ; 
entered tlie service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam-sloop Oneida, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; promoted to Paymaster, April 14th, 
1862; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1865-7 ; Inspector of Provisions, 
New York, 1869. 



PAYMASTER THOMAS C. MASTEN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 11th, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam-sloop San Jacinto, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; promoted to Paymaster, April 14th, 
1862; steam-sloop Juniata, Atlantic Coast, 1863; practice-ship Macedonian, 
1865-6 ; Inspector of Provisions, Norfolk, 1869. 



PAYMASTER PRANK COSBY. 



Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Kentucky, August 24th, 1861 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to Potomac flotilla, 1862-3 ; pro- 
moted to Paymaster, April 14th, 1862; store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1865-7 ; in charge of 
coal, Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, 1868-9 ; receiving-ship Independence, San 
Prancisco, 1869. 



PAYMASTER EDWIN STEWART. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 8th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam gunboat Pembina, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1862 ; promoted to Paymaster, April 14th, 1862 ; 
steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1866-8 ; Paymaster at Washington, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JOSEPH A. SMITH. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, October 8th, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, special service, 1862-4 ; 
promoted to Paymaster, August 23d, 1862; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1866; 
Fleet Paymaster, Gulf Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship, Boston, 1868-9. 



218 PATMASTEES. 

PAYMASTER AMBROSE J. CLARK. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 12th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster j attached to steam-sloop Tuscarora, 
special service, 1862-3; promoted to Paymaster, August 19th, 1863; steam- 
sloop Tuscarora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; steam-sloop Sus- 
quehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1865-6; special service, 1867; receiving-ship, 
New York, 1868 ; special duty, 1869. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE COCHRAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 27th, 
1861; entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam-sloop 
Wyoming, East India Squadron, 1862— 4; promoted to Paymaster, June 12th, 
1868 ; steam-frigate Wabash, 1865 ; steamer De Soto, special service, 1866 ; 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; receiving-ship and Naval Asylum, Philadel- 
phia, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER CASPER SCHENCK. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 14th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to sloop Portsmouth, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; promoted to Paymaster, January 6th, 
1864; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic Squadron, 1865 ; receiving-ship, 
Mare Island, Cal., 1867-9. 



PAYMASTER THOMAS T. CASWELL. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 9th, 
1861 ; entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam gunboat 
Huron, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; iron-clad steamer, Sanga- 
mon, 1863; steam-sloop Seminole, West Gulf Squadron, 1863-4 ; promoted to 
Paymaster, September 17th, 1863; store-ship Guard, European Squadron, 
1866-7; Navy Yard, Norfolk, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER WILLIAM W. WILLIAMS. 

_ Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, August 29th, 1861 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Louisiana, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; promoted to Paymaster, March 2d, 1864 ; steam- 
sloop Wachusett, Brazil Squadron, 1864; Mound City, Illinois, 1865; store- 
ship Fredonia, at Callao, 1867-8; special duty, South Pacific Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTERS. 219 

PAYMASTER JAMES HOT, Jk. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New York, October 11th, 1861 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam-sloop Mohican, 
special service, 1863-4 ; promoted to Paymaster, October 18th, 1864 ; special 
service. New York, 1865; steam-sloop Monongahela, West India Squadron, 
1866, and North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8 ; school-ship Constitution, 1869 ; 
at present, Naval Storekeeper, Naval Academy. 



PAYMASTER ARTHUR J. PRITCHARD. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, October 11th, 1861; enter- 
ed the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam gunboat Itasca, West 
Gulf Squadron, 1861-3 ; steam gunboat Wyalusing, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1863-5 ; promoted to Paymaster, November 9th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Ticonde- 
roga, European Squadron, 1865-8. 



PAYMASTER ALBERT J. KENNY. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Vermont, March 19th, 1862 ; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer South Carolina, South At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steamer Santiago de Cuba, North Atlan- 
tic Squadron, 1865 ; promoted to Paymaster, March 9th, 1865 ; in charge of 
stores at Loando, 1866; Paymaster at San Francisco, California, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER FORBES PARKER. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio, October 19th, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Dawn, South At- 
lantic Squadron, 1861 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 19, 
1862; steam-sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3, 
and West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863^; promoted to Paymaster, August 
25th, 1865 ; steamer Winooski, North Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; receiving 
ship, Baltimore, 1867; in charge of stores, Rio Janeiro, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER ALEXANDER MoC. BISHOP. 

Born in New_ Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, March 19th, 1862; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Wyandotte, 
Potomac flotilla, 1862 ; steamer Mendota, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864 ; promoted to Paymaster, November 22d, 1865 ; in charge of stores, Bay 
Point, S. C, 1866; store-ship Cyane, at Panama, 1868. 



220 PATMASTEES. 

PAYMASTEE GEOKGE A. LYON. 

BoEN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June lltli, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Assistant Paymaster ; Mississippi flotilla, 1862-3 ; steam- 
sloop Pontoosuc, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; receiving-ship 
Potomac, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6; promoted td Paymaster, January 23d, 1866 ; 
store-ship Idaho, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE W. BBAMAN. 

BoBN in Vermont. Appointed from Missouri, March 5th, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam gunboat Seneca, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steamer Union, East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; special duty. Mound City, Illinois, 1864 ; steamer Algonquin, 
1865-6; promoted to Paymaster, March 28th, 1866; practice-ship Marion, 
1867 ; store-ship Oyane, Panama, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER HORATIO L. "WAIT. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Illinois, July 14th, 1862; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam gunboat Pembina, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862, and West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1862-3 ; steamer Philadelphia, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; 
store-ship Ino, European Squadron, 1865-6; promoted to Paymaster, April 1st, 
1866; receiving-ship, Norfolk, Va., 1867; Navy Yard, Pensacola, Fla., 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER ARTHUR BUETIS. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, July 14th, 1862; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to steam gunboat Sangamon, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steamer Connecticut, special service, 1863, 
and North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864; steamer Muscoota, Gulf 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; promoted to Paymaster, May 4th, 1866 ; League Island, 
Pa., 1867-9. J > J > > o , 



PAYMASTER EDWIN PUTNAM. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from Maine, September 20th, 1862; entered the 
service as Assistant Paymaster; attached to iron-clad steamer Nahant, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; sloop Portsmouth, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5; steamer Mackinaw, North Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; 
promoted to Paymaster, May 4th, 1866 ; in charge of stores at Loando, 1867-8 ; 
Paymaster at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869. 



PATMASTERS. 221 

PAYMASTER GEORGE R. MARTIN. 

EoRN in New York. Appointed from New York, June 30, 1862 ; entered 
the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Albatross, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; steamer Oneida, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, June 80, 
1864; steamer Blohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1866; promoted to Pay- 
master, May 4th, 1866 ; steamer Mohican, North Pacific Squadron, 1868; 
steamer Juniata, 1869. 



PAYMASTER WILLIAM N. WATMOUGH. 

BoEN in Maryland. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 2d, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; steamer Harriet Lane, 
West Gulf, 1862 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S Navy, June 30th, 
1864; steam-sloop Kearsarge, European Squadron, 1865 ; promoted to Pay- 
master, May 4th, 186G ; store-ship Onward, Asiatic Squadron, 1868. 



PAYMASTER WORTHINGTON GOLDSBOROUGH. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 30th, 1862 ; en- 
tered 1?he service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to'SteamerSouthfield, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; store-ship St. Lawrence, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. 
Navy, July 2d, 1864 ; steamer Shamrock, European Squadron, 1866-7 ; com- 
missioned as Paymaster, May 4th, 1866 ; frigate Constitution, school-ship, 1869. 



PAYMASTER HORACE P. TUTTLE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, February 17th, 
1863 ; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to school- 
ship Macedonian, ] 863-4 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 2d, 
1864; iron-clad Catskill, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; Bureau 
of Provisions and Clothing, 1865-6; commissioned as Paymaster, May 4th, 
1866; store-ship Onward, South Atlantic Squadron, 1867; store-ship Guard, 
European Squadron, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER FRANK H. HINMAN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Ohio, March 7th, 1863 ; entered the 
service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam gunboat Penobscot, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. 
S. Navy, July 2d, 1864; commissioned as Paymaster, May 4th, 1866; special 
duty, New Orleans, 1867-8 ; iron-clad Dictator, North Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



222 PATMAST£ES. 

PAYMASTER CHARLES F. GUILD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 8tli, 1864; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster; special duty on the staff of Rear Admiral 
Porter, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864—5 ; steam-sloop Canandai- 
gua, European Squadron, 1865-8; commissioned as Paymaster, May 4th, 1866; 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JAMES E. TOLFREE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 13th, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Van- 
derbilt, special service, 1862-5 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, 
March 3d, 1865; commissioned as Paymaster, U. S. Navy, May 4th, 1866; 
steam-sloop Richmond, European Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTER LUTHER G. BILLINGS. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, October 24th, 1862 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer Water 
Witch, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; steamer Connecticut, 
special cruise, 1864r-5 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 3d, 
1865 ; steamer Wateree, South Pacific Squadron, 1866-8 ; commissioned as Pay- 
master, U. S. Navy, May 4th, 1866; receiving-ship, Norfolk, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JAMES F. HAMILTON. 

_ Born in_ Maine. Appointed from Maine, May 19th, 1863 ; entered the ser- 
vice as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to receiving-ship Clara Dolsen, 
Mississippi Squadron, 1863-4; Naval Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1865 ; ap- 
pointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 3d, 1865 ; steam-sloop Daco- 
tah. South Pacific Squadron, 1865-8; commissioned as Paymaster, U. S. Navy, 
June 29th, 1866 ; store-ship Onward, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



PAYMASTER CHARLES P. THOMPSON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from New York, January 19th, 1865 ; entered 
the service as Assistant Paymaster; special duty, Navy Department, 1865-8; 
commissioned as Paymaster, August 1st, 1866; attached to steam-sloop Ply- 
mouth, European Squadron, 1869. 



PAYMASTERS. " 223 

PAYMASTER FRANCIS H. SWAN. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, December 9th, 
1861 J entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer 
Potomska, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; prisoner of war, 
1864-5; appointed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 9th, 1865; steamer 
Frolic, European Squadron, 1865-7 ; promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, 
May 4th, 1866; commissioned as Paymaster, March 5th, 1867; steam-sloop 
Saranao, North Pacific Squadron, 1867-8 ; practice-ship Macedonian, 1869. 



PAYMASTER SAMUEL T. BROWNE. 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island, September 30th, 
1862 ; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to iron- 
clad steamer Montauk, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; iron- 
clad Onondago, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; appointed As- 
sistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, March 9th, 1865 ; steamer Mackinaw, North 
Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; promoted to Passed Assistant Paymaster, May 4th, 
1866; steamer Ashuelot, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9; commissioned as Pay- 
master, March 22d, 1867. 



PAYMASTER ROBERT P. LISLE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 2d, 1863 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; special duty, Bureau of Pro- 
visions and Clothing, 1863-4 ; appointed Assistant Paymaster, July 2d, 1864 ; 
iron-clad Canonicus, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864^5 ; steam-sloop 
Swatara, West India Squadron, 1865-6 ; promoted to Passed Assistant Pay- 
master, May 4th, 1866 ; steam-sloop Resaca, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-9 ; 
commissioned as Paymaster, December 11th, 1867. 



PAYMASTER ROBERT W. ALLEN. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, January 20th, 1864 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Ma- 
haska, East G-ulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; store-ship New Hampshire, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; receiving-ship New Hampshire, 
Norfolk, Va., 1866; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 
23d, 1866; steam-sloop Besaca, European Squadron, 1867-9; commissioned as 
Paymaster, February 1st, 1868. 



PAYMASTER HENRY M. MEADE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, January 31st, 1862 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to receiving-ship, 



224 FAYMASTEES. 

New York, 1862-4; steamer Mattabessett, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5; special duty, Navy Department, 1865-6 j appointed Passed Assistant 
Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; steam-sloop Juniata, South Atlantic 
Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9 ; com- 
missioned as Paymaster, April 9th, 1868. 



PAYMASTEE FRANK CLAEKE. 

Born in P»,hode Island. Appointed from Ehode Island, December 4th, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Curri- 
tuck, Potomac flotilla, 1862-5; barque L. G. Kuhn, Gulf Squadron, 1865-6; 
appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, July 23d, 1866 ; steamer Paul Jones, 
Grulf Squadron, 1867 ; commissioned as Paymaster, June 5th, 1868 ; steamer 
De Soto, North Atlantic Squadron, 1868 ; receiving-ship, Baltimore, 1869. 



PAYMASTER ALBERT D. BACHE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 19th, 
1862 ; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer 
Hendrick Hudson, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steam gunboat 
Tacony, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, 
United States Navy, July 23d, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Iroquois, Asiatic Squad- 
ron, 1866-9 ; commissioned as Paymaster, June 11th, 1868. 



PAYMASTER DOMINIOK B. BATIONE. 

Born in Spain. Appointed from Nevada, March 15th, 1865 ; entered the 
service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; Potomac flotilla, 1865 ; appointed 
Passed Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; steamer Cone- 
inaugh, Atlantic Squadron, 1866-7; store-ship Purveyor, 1868-9; commis- 
sioned as Paymaster, August 26th, 1868. 



PAYMASTER WILLIAM F. A. TORBERT. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, May 11th, 1864 ; entered 
the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to iron-clad Lehigh, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, Pensacola, 1866; appoint- 
ed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 2.3d, 1866 ; suppJy steamer 
IMassaohusetts, 1866-7; steam-sloop Wampanoag, 1867-8; commissioned as 
Paymaster, September 16th, 1868; special duty, Philadelphia, 1869 ; at present, 
attached to school-ship Savannah. 



PAYMASTERS. 225 

PAYMASTEE LEONARD A. FEAILEY. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, Au- 
gust 20th, 1864; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached 
to steamer Quaker City, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; steamer 
Nyack, Pacific Squadron, 1865-7; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. 
Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; special duty, Navy Yard, Washington, 1867-8 ; Naval 
Station, Mound City, Illinois, 1869; commissioned as Paymaster, 1869. 



PAYMASTEE JOHN H. STEVENSON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 19th, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Satel- 
lite, Potomac flotilla, 1862-3 ; steam-sloop Pensaoola, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1868-4; steamer Massasoit, North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-5 ; ap- 
pointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; North At- 
lantic Squadron, 1866 ; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-9 ; 
commissioned as Paymaster, 1869. 



PAYMASTEE THOMAS L. TULLOCK, Jr. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New Hampshire, May 11th, 1863 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Adela, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; steamer Paul Jones, Gulf Squadron, 
1865-6; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23d, 1866; 
steam-sloop Oneida, Asiatic Squadron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Paymaster, 
1869. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE E. HENDEE. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, March 25th, 1864 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Don, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; appointed Passed Assistant 
Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23, 1866; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1866-9 ; commissioned as Paymaster, 1869. 



PAYMASTEE MILTON B. CUSHING. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from New York, August 20th, 1864 ; entered the 
service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steam gunboat Seneca, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam gunboat Chicora, Gulf Squad- 
15 



226 PATMASTEES. 

ron, 1865-6; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23d, 
1866; steamer Suwanee, North Pacific- Squadron, 1866-8; commissioned as 
Paymaster, 1869. 



PAYMASTER J. HENRY BULKLEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, November 4th, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to ship National 
Guard, Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; steamer Vicksburg, North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 
23d, 1866 ; steamer Monocacy, Asiatic Squadron, 1866-9 ; commissioned as Pay- 
master, 1869. 



PAYMASTER ROBERT B. RODNEY. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 25th, 1862 ; en- 
tered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to sloop Dale, East 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ;, schooner James S. Chambers, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; steamer Conemaugh, Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6; 
appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; school- 
ship Constitution, 1867; commissioned as Paymaster, 1869. 



PAYMASTER JAMES S. GIRAUD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from District of Columbia, December 12th, 
1864; entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster; attached to steamer 
Gettysburg, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; steamer Wasp, Brazil 
Squadron, 1865-7 ; Appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy, 
July 2od, 1866; apprentice-ship, Saratoga, 1867-9 ; commissioned as Paymas- 
ter, 1869. 



PAYMASTER GEORGE L. MEADE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 11th, 1862 ; 
entered the service as Acting Assistant Paymaster ; attached to steamer Sove- 
reign, Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3 ; steam gunboat, Itasca, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864; receiving-ship. New York, 1865; steamer South Caro- 
hna, Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; appointed Passed Assistant Paymaster, U. S. 
Navy, July 23d, 1866 ; steamer Memphis, Atlantic Squadron, 1866 ; Naval 
Storekeeper, Key West, Fla., 1867-9 ; commissioned as Paymaster, 1869. 



i CHIEF ENGINEERS. 227 

CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM W. W. WOOD. 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from New York, March 15th, 1845 ; 
entered the service with the rank of Chief Engineer j stationed at Navy Yard, 
Pensacola, 1845-7 ; special duty, Boston, 1849 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home 
Squadron, 1850-,^; superintending construction of engines of steam-frigate 
Merrimack, Cold Spring, New York, 1854-7; special duty, Philadelphia, 
1858-9; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61; special duty, Phil- 
adelphia, 1862; special duty, New Fork, 1863; special duty, Boston, 1864; 
special duty. New York, 1865 ; Naval Academy, 1866-7; Navy Yard, New 
York, 1868-9 ; at present, Inspector of Machinery afloat, New York. 



CHIEF ENGINEEE BENJAMIN F. ISHERWOOD. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, May 23d, 1844 ; entered 
the service as First-Assistant Engineer ; stationed at Navy Yard, Pensacola, 
1844-5 ; attached to steamer General Taylor, Pensacola, 1846-7 ; special duty, 
1848-50 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, October 81st, 1848 ; special duty. Navy 
Department, 1852-3 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1854r-8 ; 
special duty, 1859-60 ; appointed Engineer-in-Chief, 1861, which position he 
retained until 1869 ; at present, on duty at Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. 



CHIEF ENGINEER GEORGE SEWELL. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, March 18th, 1847; 
entered the service with the rank of First- Assistant Engineer; attached to 
steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, during the Mexican war ; special duty, Nor- 
folk, Va., 1849-52; commissioned as Chief Engineer, July 15th, 1852 ; steam- 
frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1852-6; Inspector of Ocean Steamers, 
etc., 1857-8; special duty. Mare Island, California, 1859; steam-sloop Susque- 
hanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1860 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1862-3; special duty. New York, 1864-5; Fleet Engineer, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1866-8 ; special duty, Newburg, New York, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM H. SHOCK. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, January 18th, 1845 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steamer General Taylor, Home 
Squadron, during the Mexican war; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, 
July 10th, 1847 ; steamer Engineer, Home Squadron, 1848-9 ; promoted to 
First- Assistant Engineer, October 1st, 1848 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East 
India Squadron, 1850-1; special duty, Boston, 1852 ; promoted to Chief Engi- 
neer, September 16th, 1862 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1853-4 ; 



22S CHIEF ENGINEEES. 

Steam-frigate Merrimack, 1856; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 
1857-60; special duty, 1861; special duty, St. Louis, Mo., 1862-3; Fleet 
Engineer, West Gulf Bloekadiug Squadron, 1863-5; Navy Yard, Boston, 1866; 
Navy Yard, Washington, 18S7-8 ; Fleet Engineer European Squadron, 1868-9 ; 
at present, Inspector of Machinery afloat, Washington, D. C. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JAMES W. KING. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, September 2d, 1844 ; en- 
tered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; steamer General Taylor, Home 
Squadron, 1844-5 ; steamer Mississippi; Home Squadron, during the Mexican. 
war; promoted to Seco-nd- Assistant Engineer, July 10th, 1847; steamer Prince- 
ton, Mediterranean Squadron, 1847-9 ; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, 
Sept. 13th, 1849 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 12th, 1852 ; steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes, 1852-3; Inspector Ocean Steamers, New York, 1854 ; 
Superintendent construction of engines of steam-frigate Wabash, at Philadel- 
phia, 1855-6 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; Navy Yard, 
New York, 1858-60 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861; special duty, Pittsburg, Pa., 1862-3; special duty, St. Louis, Mo., 1864; 
special duty, 1865 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1866-7 ; special duty, New York, 
1868-9 ; appointed Engineer-in-Chief, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER THEODORE ZELLER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, June 15th, 1843; en- 
tered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steamer Col. Harney, Home 
Squadron, 1843-7; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, July 10th, 1847 
steamer Iris, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; steamer Massachusetts, Pacific Squad- 
ron, 1849-53 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851 , 
steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-6; promoted to Chief En- 
gineer, June 27th, 1857; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9; 
steamer Michigan, on the ^akes, 1860-1; special duty, 1861; special duty 
New York, 1862-3 ; Fleet Engineer, East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; 
Fleet Engineer, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Navv Yard. 
Philadelphia, 1866-9. > J > 



CHIEF ENGINEER ELBRIDGE LAWTON. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, March 23d, 1848; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; Home Squadron, 1848 ; special 
?o'?' ^^1''™°'^®' 1849-50; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, September 
13th, 1849 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1850-2 ; promoted to First- 
Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851; steamer John Hancock, North Pacific 
Expedition, 1852-5; promoted to Chief Engineer, June 26th, 1856 ; steam- 
trigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1859-60; steam-sloop Mississippi, West Gulf 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 229 

Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; special duty, New York, 1863-4 ; Fleet Engineer, 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1865; special duty, New York, 1866-7 ; special 
duty, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 1868-9 j at present, on duty at Navy Yard, 



Boston. 



CHIEF ENGINEEK ROBEKT DANBY. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Massachusetts, March 23d, 1848 ; en- 
tered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; steamer Colonel Harney, Home 
Squadron, 1845-7 ; steamer General Taylor, Home Squadron, 1847-8 ; pro- 
moted to Second- Assistant Engineer, July 10th, 1847 ; steamer Mississippi, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 
February 1st, 1851; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-5; 
special duty. New York, 1856-7 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, June 26th, 
1856 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, flag-ship East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1861-2 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1863 ; Fleet Engineer, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; special duty, New York, 1866-7 ; 
Inspector, Navy Yard, New York, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER BENJAMIN F. GAEVIN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 29th, 1847 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; steamer Spitfire, Home Squad- 
ron, 1847-8; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, October 31st, 1848; 
steamer Water Witch, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; Coast Survey, 1851 ; pro- 
moted to First-Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851 ; steam-frigate San 
Jacinto, Mediterranean Squadron, 1851-3 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 
1854-5 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1856 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squad- 
ron, 1856-7 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, May 11th, 1858 ; steam-frigate 
Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1861-2 ; 
special duty. New York, 1863 ; Fleet Engineer, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864 ; steam-frigate Colorado, flag-ship European Squadron, 1865-7; 
President Board of Examiners, 1868-9; at present. Inspector of Machinery 
afloat, Philadelphia. 



CHIEF ENGINEER HENRY H. STEWART. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, March 23d, 1848 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; Home Squadron, 1848-9; 
promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, September 13th, 1849 ; Coast Survey, 
1849 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1850-5 ; promoted to 
First-Assistant , Engineer, February 26th, 1851 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 
1856; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, July 1st, 1858; 
steam-sloop Dacotah, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; special duty, Wil- 
mington, Delaware, 1862^; steamer Wyalusing, North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5 ; President of Board of Examiners, 1866-7 ; member of 
Board of Examiners, 1868-9 ; at present, on duty at Navy Yard, Norfolk, Ya. 



230 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENGINEER HAEMAN NEWELL. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, September 22d, 
1849 ; entered the service as Third-AssistantEngineer ; Coast Survey, 1849-50 ; 
office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1851 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, 
February 26tb, 1851 ; steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 1851-2 ; steam-frigate 
Saranac, Home Squadron, 1853 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, May 
21st, 1853 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1854-5 ; special duty, 1856-7 ; 
steamer Fulton, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; promoted 
to Chief Engineer, April 23d, 1859 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1861; frigate New Ironsides, special service, 1862-3; Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, 1864-5 ; Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, 1866-9 ; at pre- 
sent, Fleet Engineer, South Atlantic Squadron. 



CHIEF ENGINEER ANDREW LAWTON. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, June 24th, 1850 ; 
entered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1850 ; steamer 
Water Witch, Home Squadron, 1851; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, 
February 26th 1851 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1852-3 ; pro- 
moted to First-Assistant Engineer, May 21st, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1854-5 ; 
steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1855-8; special duty, Boston, 
1859-60 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, April 23d, 1859 ; steam-sloop Hart- 
ford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; special duty, Taunton, Mass., 
1862 ; special duty, Boston, 1863-4 ; special duty, Wilmington, Del., 1865 ; 
steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1866-8 ; Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER EDMUND S. De LUCE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 22d, 1849 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; office of Engineer-in-Chief, 
1849-51 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851 ; 
steamer Vixen, Home Squadron, 1851-2; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 
May 21st, 1853 ; Coast Survey, 1863-5 ; steam-frigate San Jacinto, East India 
Squadron, 1855-8 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; promoted 
to Chief Engineer, October 12th, 1861 ; special duty, 1861 ; special duty, 
Boston, 1862-3 ; special duty, New York, 1864 ; Navy Yard, New York, 1865 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, flag-ship Brazil Squadron, 1865-7 ; special duty, New 
York, 1867-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER EDWIN FITHIAN. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from Pennsylvania, October 31st, 1848 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; special duty, Boston, 1849-50; 
promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851 ; steam-frigate 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 231 

Susquehanna, East India Squadron, 1851-5 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engi- 
neer, May 21st, 1853 ; special duty, Eichmond, 1856 ; steam-frigate Susque- 
hanna, Mediterranean Squadron, 1856-8; special duty, Philadelphia, 1859; 
steam-sloop Narragansett, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61 ; promoted to Chief Engi- 
neer, October 23d, 1859 ; special duty, New York, 1862-3 ; steam-frigate Roa- 
noke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-5 ; special duty, New York, 
1866-8 ; Fleet Engineer, European Squadron, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER MONTGOMERY FLE^TCHER. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June 25th, 1850 ; enter- 
ed the service as Third-Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1850-1; promoted 
to Second-Assistant Engineer, February 21st, 1857 ; special duty, Norfolk, 
1852-3 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean Squadron, 1854-6 ; promoted to 
First- Assistant Engineer, June 21st, 1856; office of Engineer-in-Ohief, 1857 ; 
steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857-8 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, 
October 25th, 1859; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1861-5 ; special 
duty, New York, 1866; Navy Yard, Mare Island, Cal., 1867-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER THOMAS A SHOCK. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 6th, 1851; enter- 
ed the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East 
India Squadron, 1851-5 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, May 21st, 
1853 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1856 ; promoted to First-Assistant En- 
gineer, June 21st, 1856; steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-60; 
promoted to Chief Engineer, December 6th, 1859 ; steam-sloop Mohican, At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1862 ; 
special duty, Hartford, 1863-8 ; Fleet Engineer, North Atlantic Squadron, 
1859. 



CHIEF ENGINEER CHARLES A. LORING. 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachusetts, February 26th, 
1851; entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1851 ; 
special duty, Baltimore, 1852 ; steamer Princeton, Home Squadron, 1858-5 ; 
promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, Blay 21st, 1853 ; steam-frigate Merri- 
mack, Pacific Squadron, 1855-9 ; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, May 
9th, 1857 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, March 21st, 1861; steam-frigate Min- 
nesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-8; special duty, 
Cincinnati, 1863-4 ; special duty, St. Louis, 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, 
special service, 1867; steam-frigate Minnesota, special service, 1868 ; Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1869. 



232 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENGINEER ALEXANDER HENDERSON. 

BoKN in District of Columbia. Appointed from Virginia, February 26th, 
1851 ; entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; steam-frigate Susque- 
hanna, East India Squadron, 1852-5 ; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, 
May 21st, 1853 ; office of Engineer-in-chief, 1856; steam-frigate Susquehanna, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1857-8 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, May 
9th, 1857 ; steamer Southern Star, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 
1868; steam-sloop Iroquois, Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60; promoted to 
Chief Engifaeer, Jane 28th, 1861 ; special service, 1861 ; steam-sloop Adiron- 
dack, Blockading Squadron, 1862; special duty, Newburg, N. Y., 1863; iron- 
clad Onondaga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty, 
Navy Yard, Washington, 1866 ; Navy Yard, Boston, 1867-8 ; special duty, 
1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER STEPHEN D. HIBBERT. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, February 26th, 1851 ; entered 
the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; steam-frigato Susquehanna, East India 
Squadron, 1851-5 ; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, May 21st, 1853 ; 
steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1856-7 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 
May 9th, 1857 ; steam-frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1857-9 ; promoted 
to Chief Engineer, June 29th, 1861; special duty, 1861; steam-sloop Pensa- 
cola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-3 ; special duty, Bureau of Steam 
Engineering, 1863-7 ; Fleet Engineer, Asiatic Squadron, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER FRANCIS C. DADE. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, January 20th, 1849 ; entered 
the service as Third-Assistant Engineer; steamer Water Witch, Home Squad- 
ron, 1849-50; steam-frigate Saranac, Ilome Squadron, 1851-2; promoted to 
Second-Assistant Engineer, February 26th, 1851 ; Coast Survey, 1852-3 ; pro- 
moted to First-Assistant Engineer, May 21st, 1853 ; steam-frigate Saranao, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1853-6 ; Coast Survey, 1857 ; special duty, connected 
with the Colorado, 1858 ; special duty, Boston, 1859 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
East India Squadron, 1859-61 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, June 30th, 1861 ; 
steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1864-5; steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1866-7; 
member Board of Examiners, 1866-8 ; Inspector of Machinery afloat, Nor- 
folk, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER DAVID B. MACOMB. 

Born in Florida. Appointed from Pennsylvania, January 11th, 1849; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; office of Eogineer-in-Chief, 
1849-50; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, February 20th, 1851; 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 233 

special duty, New York, 1851 ; special duty, 1852 ; steamer John Hancock, 
Home Squadron, 1853-5; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, June 26th, 
1856; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1656-8; steam-frigate Sara- 
nac. Pacific Squadron, 1859-60; steam-frigate Niagara, Blockading Squadron, 
1861 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, September 16th, 1861 ; special duty, Bos- 
ton, 1862; special duty, New York, 1863 ; iron-clad steamer Canonious, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; special duty, Baltimore, 1866 ; Navy 
Yard, Pensacola, 1867; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H,, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER EDWARD D. ROBIE. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from New York, February 16th, 1852; 
entered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East 
India Squadron, 1852-5 ; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, June 27th, 
1856 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1856 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1857-8 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, July 21st, 
1858 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61 ; promoted to Chief 
Engineer, September 21st, 1861; special duty. New York, 1862-4; iron-clad 
Dictator, special service, 1864-5 ; member Board of Examiners, 1866 ; steam- 
sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; Fleet Engineer, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1868 ; Inspector of Machinery afloat, Boston, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER THOMAS WILLIAMSON. 

Born in North Carolina. Appointed from Virginia, May 24th, 1853 ; enter- 
ed the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, 1853-6 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, June 22d, 
1855; special duty, connected with steam-frigate Powhatan, 1857 ; steam-frigate 
Wabash, flag-ship Home Squadron, 1858-9 ; promoted to First- Assistant En- 
gineer, 1859; steam-sloops Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61; promoted to 
Chief Engineer, September 21st, 1861 ; special duty. Mystic, Connecticut, 
1862-8 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1863-4; special duty. New York, 1865-7; Naval Academy, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM S. STAMM. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Delaware, February 26th, 1851 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; Coast Survey, 1851-2 ; steam- 
frigate Powhatan, Bast India Squadron, 1852-6; promoted to Second- Assistant 
Engineer May 21st, 1853 ; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, May 9th, 
1857; special duty, 1857-8; steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 
1859-61 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, September 22d, 1861 ; steam-sloop 
Canandaigua, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; special duty, 
Newburg, New York, 1864-8 ; Fleet Engineer, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



234 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENaiNEER WILLIAM J. LAMDEN. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, February 16th, 1861 ; en- 
tered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; Coast Survey, 1851 ; promoted 
to Second-Assistant Engineer, October 1st, 1852 ; steamer Water Witch, Survey 
of river La Plata, 1852-6 ; Coast Survey, 1857 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific 
Squadron, 1857-9 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, May 9th, 1857 ; steam- 
sloop Powhatan, Blockading Squadron, 1861; promoted to Chief Engineer, Oc- 
tober 1st, 1861; special duty, Baltimore, 1862-5; steam-sloop Daeotah, South 
Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; Fleet Engineer, South Pacific Squadron, 1868. 



CHIEF ENGINEER GEORGE R. JOHNSON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, February 16th, 1852; entered 
the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; East India Squadron, 1852 ; steamer 
Princeton, Home Squadron, 1853-4 ; special duty, Norfolk, 1855-6 ; promoted 
to Second- Assistant Engineer, February 27th, 1855 ; steam-frigate Merrimack, 
special cruise, 1857; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, July 21st, 1858; 
steam-sloop Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1861—4 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, 
December 1st, 1861 ; special duty, Chester, Pa., 1865-7 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; iron-clad Dictator, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM B. BROOKS. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Virginia, February 16th, 1852 ; entered 
the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steamer Michigan, on the lakes 
1852-4 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1855 ; steam-frigate San 
Jacinto, East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer 
June 27th, 1855 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-61 ; promoted 
to First- Assistant Engineer, July 21st, 1858 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-3; promoted to Chief Engineer, October 16th, 
1861 ; special duty, New York, 1864-6 ; steam-frigate Sacramento, North Pacific 
Squadron, 1867-8 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JAMES B. KIMBALL. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois, September 8th, 1858; entered 
the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steamer Fulton, Home Squadron, 
1853-6 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, June 26th, 1856 ; steam- 
frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1857; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1858; 
steam-frigate Wabash, 1859 ; promoted to First-Assistnnt Engineer, 1859 ; 
special duty, 1861; steam-sloop Hartford, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861-3 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, October 17th, 1861 ; special duty, New 
York, 1864-5; steam-frigate Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; steamer 
Michigan, 1869. 



OHIEr ENGINEERS. 235 

CHIEF ENGINEEK JOHN W. MOORE. 

BoKN in New York. Appointed from New York, May 21st, 1853 ; entered 
the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; steam-frigate Saranac, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1853-6; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, June 27th, 1855 ; 
steam-frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-9 ; promoted to First- Assistant 
Engineer, 1859; steam-sloop Richmond, West G-ulf Blockading Squadron, 
1861-3 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 29th, 1861 ; special duty, 
Philadelphia, 1864; special duty. East Boston, 1865-7 ; Fleet Engineer, Euro- 
pean Squadron, 1868 ; Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER CHARLES H. BAKER. 

BoKN in Massachusetts. Appointed from Massachiisetts, August 2d, 1855; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; steam frigate San Jacinto, 
East India Squadron, 1856-8 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, July 
21st, 1858; steamer M. W. Chapin, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 
1859-60 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 1859 ; steamer Mystic, 1861 ; 
promoted to Chief Engineer, October 29th, 1861; member Board of Examiners, 
1863 ; special duty, Boston, 1864-7 ; Fleet Engineer, South Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1868-9; steam-sloop Guerriere, South Atlantic Squadron, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JOHN S. ALBERT. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, September 8th, 1855; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; Coast Survey, 1857-8 ; pro- 
moted to Second- Assistant Engineer, July 21st, 1858 ; steamer Westernport, 
Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1859-60; promoted to First- Assis- 
tant Engineer, 1859 ; steamer Mohawk, Home Squadron, 1860-1 ; promoted to 
Chief Engineer, October 29th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Housatonic, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; special duty, New York, 1865-8; Fleet Engineer, 
South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9; steam-sloop Powhatan, Pacific Squadron, 
1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER RICHARD M. BARTLEMAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, December 24th, 
1853 ; entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; office of Engineer-iu- 
Chief, 1854; Coast Survey, 1855; steam-frigate Merrimack, Home Squadron, 
1856-7 ; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, May 9th, 1857 ; steam- 
frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1858-61 ; promoted to First- Assistant 
Engineer, 1859 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 6th, 1861 ; steam- 
frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; special duty, 
Portsmouth, 1865 j steam-sloop Shenandoah, East India Squadron, 1866-9. 



236 CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENGINEEE MORTIMER KELLOGG. 

BoEN in New York. Appointed from New York, February 16th, 1852 ; en- 
tered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; East India Squadron, 1852-3 ; 
steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1853-6 ; promoted to Second- 
Assistant Engineer, June 27th, 1855 ; special duty. New York, 1857 ; promoted , 
to First- Assistant Engineer, 1859 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, Coast of Africa, 
' 1860-1 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 8th, 1861 ; steam-sloop San 
Jacinto, East Gulf Squadron, 1862-3 ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 1864-5 ; special 
duty, New York, 1866 ; special duty, Bridgeport, Conn., 1867 ; steamer De Soto, 
North Atlantic Squadron, 1868. 



CHIEF ENGINEER GEORGE T. KUTZ. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, June 26th, 1856; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer ; special duty connected with 
Niagara, 1858; steamer Atlanta, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 
1859 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 1859 ; steamer Saginaw, East India 
Squadron, 1860-1 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 10th, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; steam-sloop Mo- 
nongahela. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863, and West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, European Squadron, 
1866-9 ; Inspector of Machinery afloat. League Island, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER ANDREW J. KIERSTED. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, June 26th, 1856; entered 
the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; special duty, Philadelphia, 1866-7; 
steam-frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, East 
India Squadron, 1859 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 1859 ; steam-sloop 
Mohican, Coast of Africa, 1860-1 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora; special service, 
1861-3; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 12th, 1861; steam-sloop Tus- 
carora, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, Philadel- 
phia, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, Pacific Fleet, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM H. RUTHERFORD. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Virginia, September 22d, 1849 ; en- 
tered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; Coast Survey, 1351; promoted to 
Second-Assistant, February 16th, 1852 ; attached to steam-frigate Mississippi, 
East India Squadron, 1853-6; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, June 
26th, 1856 ; special duty connected with Roanoke, 1857 ; steam-frigate Powha- 
tan, East India Squadron, 1858-68 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, December 
1st, 1861; steam-sloop Pawnee, 1861; steam-sloop Juniata, 1802; steam-sloop 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 237 

Mississippi, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863; steam-sloop Waoliusett, 
Brazil Squadron, 1864-5; steam-sloop Monongahela, West India Squadron, 1866; 
steam-sloop Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1867-9 ; special duty^ Providence, 
Rhode Island. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM W. DUNGAN. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland, June 26th, 1856 ; entered 
the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; attached to steam-frigate Powhatan, 
East India Squadron, 1858-60 ; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, 1860 ; 
steam-frigate Minnesota, 1S61 ; steam gunboat Ottawa, South Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1861-2 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, February 1st, 1861 ; 
steam-sloop Daootah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; special 
duty, Philadelphia, 1865; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 
1865-7 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Lacka- 
wanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; special duty, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JAMES W. THOMPSON, Jr. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from New Jersey, June 26th, 1856 ; en- 
tered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; attached to steam-frigate Wa- 
bash, Home Squadron, 1857-60; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, 1860 ; 
steam-sloop Dacotah, 1861 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, February 2d, 1862 ; 
steam-sloop Shenandoah, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; special 
duty, Philadelphia, 1865 ; member of Board of Examiners, 1866-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER THOMAS J. JONES. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from New York, June 26th, 1856 ; entered the 
service as Third-Assistant Engineer ; attached to steam-frigate Wabash, Home 
Squadron, 1857-8; promoted to Second-Assistant Engineer, July 21st, 1858; 
steamer Atlanta, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; steamer 
Sumpter, Coast of Africa, 18S0-1 ; promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, 1860 ; 
steam gunboat Penobscot, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; pro- 
moted to Chief Engineer, January 18th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Tioonderoga, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron^ 1863-4; special duty, New York, 1865-8. 



CHIEF ENGINEER WILLIAM H. HUNT. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York, December, 24th, 1858 ; 
entered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer; special duty, 1853-4 ; attached 



238 CHIEF ENGINEEES. 

to steam-frigate Saa Jacinto, special service, 1854-5; office of Engineer-in- 
CHef, 1856; Coast Survey, 1857; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, 
May 9tli, 1857 ; steam-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1857-60 ; promoted 
to First-Assistant Engineer, August 2d, 1859 ; steam-sloop Mississippi, West 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, February 
19th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Oneida, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; 
steamer Bienville, 1865; steam-sloop Dacotah, South Pacific Squadron, 1867-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JACKSON McELMELL. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, August 2d, 1855 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer, attached to steamer Michigan, 
on the lakes, 1856-7 ; special duty connected with Niagara, 1858 ; steamer 
Memphis, Brazil Squadron, and Paraguay Expedition, 1858-9 ; promoted to 
First-Assistant Engineer, March 25th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1860-1 ; steam gunboat Octorara, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861-2; promoted to Chief Engineer, April 21st, 1863; 
steam-sloop Richmond, North Atlantic 'Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; steam- 
sloop Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; special duty, Phila- 
delphia, 1865-7 ; special duty. League Island, Pa., 1868 ; steam-sloop Plymouth, 
European Squadron, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER B. B. H. WHARTON. 

Born in Virginia. Appointed from Maryland, November 21st, 1857 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; attached to steamer Water 
Witch, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay Expedition, 1857-9 ; steam-sloop Sara- 
nac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-61; promoted to Second- Assistant Engineer, 1859 ; 
promoted to First- Assistant Engineer, October 16th, 1861; steam gunboat 
Mahaska, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862 ; iron-clad Patapsco, 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; steam gunboat Chicopee, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 
10th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1865-7; inspector, 
Navy Yard, Boston, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JAMES W. WHITTAKER. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey, November 21st, 1857 ; 
entered the service as Third- Assistant Engineer; office of Engineer-in-Chief, 1857 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, Home Squadron, 1858-61 ; promoted to First-Assistant 
Engineer, October 16th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Kearsarge, special service, 1862 ; 
special duty, Cairo, Illinois, 1863 ; steamer Octorara, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1863-6 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, November 10th, 1863 ; mem- 
ber of Board of Examiners, 1867 ; Inspector, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 
1868 ; steam-sloop Tuscarora, South Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 239. 

CHIEF ENGINEER GEOEGE S. BRIGHT. 

Born Iq District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, May 
20 th, 1857 ; steam-frigate Powhatan, East India Squadron, 1857-60 ; promoted 
to Second-Assistant Engineer, 1860 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, July 1st, 
1861 ; iron-clad steamer New Ironsides, special service, 1862; iron-clad steamer 
Passaic, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863 ; promoted to Chief Engi- 
neer, November 10th, 1863 ; steam-sloop San Jacinto, East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; special duty, Philadelphia, 1866; steam-sloop Pawnee, 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1866-9. 



CHIEF ENGINEER PHILIP INCH. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia, No- 
vember 21st, 1857; entered the service as Third-Assistant Engineer; steam- 
frigate Roanoke, Home Squadron, 1858-60 ; promoted to Second- Assistant 
Engineer, 1860 ; steam-sloop Wyoming, East India Squadron, 1861-4 ; promoted 
to First-Assistant Engineer, July 1st, 1861 ; promoted to Chief Engineer, No- 
vember 10th, 1863 ; special duty, Providence, Rhode Island, 1865-8 ; steam- 
sloop Mohican, Pacific Fleet, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JOHN JOHNSON. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware, May 20th, 1857; steam- 
frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; promoted to Second- Assistant 
Engineer, 1860; steam-sloop Pawnee, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861; 
promoted to First-Assistant Engineer, July 1st, 1861 ; steam gunboat Pinola, 
"Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; promoted to Chief Engineer, 
November 10th, 1863 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil Squadron, 1864-6 ; 
steam-sloop Richmond, European Squadron, 1869. 



CHIEF ENGINEER JOHN H. LONG. 

Born in England. Appointed from New York, July 1st, 1861 ; entered the 
service as Acting First- Assistant Engineer; attached to steam-sloop Iroquois, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861-2 ; special duty, New York, 1862 ; 
steam-frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; 
appointed Chief Engineer, U. S. Navy, November 10th, 1863 ; special duty, 
New York, 1865-8 ; steam-sloop Seminole, North Atlantic Fleet, 1869. 



240 MARINE COEPS. 

CHIEF ENGINEER JOHN Q. A. ZIEGLEE, 

Born ia Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania, February 24tli, 1862; 
entered tlie service as Acting First- Assistant Engineer; attached to steamer 
Florida, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862; promoted to Acting 
Chief Engineer, February 4th, 1863; iron-clad Monadnock, South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1865 ; attached to iron-clad Monadnock, on her passage 
from New York to San Francisco, 1866-7; commissioned as Chief Engineer, 
U. S. Navy, June 18th, 1868; League Island, Pa., 1868-9. 



OFFICERS OF THE MARINE CORPS. 



BRIGADIER-GENERAL JACOB ZEILIN, COMMANDANT. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second-Lieutenant, October 1st, 1831 ; Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachu- 
setts, 1882-3 ; sloop Erie, Brazil Squadron, 1833-8 ; commissioned as First- 
Lieutenant, September 12th, 1836 ; Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
1839-40; frigate Columbia, Brazil Squadron, 1842-5; frigate Congress, Pa- 
cific Squadron, during the Mexican war ; commissioned as Captain, September 
14th, 1847 ; brevetted Major for gallantry in action, 1847 ; Marine Barracks, 
Gosport, Va., 1849-52 ; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1852-3 ; 
steam-frigate k'usquehanna. East India Squadron, 1853-i; Marine Barracks, 
Gosport, Va., 1855-7; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1858; 
steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squadron, 1858-9 ; Marine Barracks, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1860-2. 

Brevet Major Zeilin participated in the battle of Bull Run, and was 
wounded; commissioned as Major, July 26th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Brook- 
lyn, New York, 1863-4; commissioned as Colonel, and appointed Commandant 
of the Marine Corps, June 10th, 1864; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 
1864-9 ; commissioned as Brigadier-General, March 2d, 1867. 



GENERAL STAFF. 



MAJOR WILLIAM B. SLACK, QUARTERMASTER. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, January 28th, 1839; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 1839-40; 
frigate Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-4 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 
1845-6 ; Home Squadron, during Mexican war ; brevetted Captain for bravery 



MARINE CORPS. 



241 



in battfe, 1847; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Marct 3d, 1847; Marino 
Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1850-1 ; steam-frigate Susquehanna, East India 
Squadron, 1851-2; steam-frigate Mississippi, East India Squadron, 1853-5; 
Marine Harracks, Washington, D. C, 1855-6; receiving-ship Pennsylvania^ 
Norfolk, Va., 1857 ; commissioned as Captain, February 18th, 1857 ; steam- 
frigate Merriujack, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60; commissioned as Major, and 
appointed Quartermaster of Marine Corps, 1861; headquarters, Washington, 
D. C, 1861-9. 



MAJOR AUGUSTUS S. NICHOLSON, INSPECTOR. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 16th, 1827; on duty with the army in Mexico, 1847-8; 
brevetted for bravery in action, September 13th, 1847 ; razee Independence, 
Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 
1852; frigate St. Lawrence, Pacific Squadron, 1858 ; sloop Germantown, Brazil 
Squadron, 1854-6; commissioned as First Lieutenant, March 14th, 1856; 
Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1857 ; receiving-ship Pennsylvania, Nor- 
folk, Va., 1858; stea-m-frigate Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1859-60; commis- 
sioned as Major, and appointed Adjutant and Inspector of the Marine Corps, 
1861 ; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 1861-9. 



MAJOR JOHN C. CASH, PAYMASTER. ' 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, March 14th, 1845; frigate Columbus, East India Squadron, 
1846-8; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1849-50; frigate Raritan, 
Pacific Squadron, 1850-2 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, September 21st, 
1852; Murine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1853-5; sloop Sara- 
toga, Home Squadron, 1855-6; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. 
C., 1857; steam-frigate Saranab, Pacific Squadron, 1857-8; frigate Sabine, 
Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; commissioned as Captain, 1861 ; commissioned as 
Major and apnointed Paymaster of the Marine Corps, 1862; headquarters, 
Washington, D. C, 1862-9. 



CAPTAIN WM. A. T. MADDOX, ASSISTANT-QUARTERMASTER. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March .14th, 1837; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1839-40; frigate 
Delaware, Brazil Squadron, 1841-4; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 1845; 
sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, during war with Mexico; brevetted Captain, for 
gallant and meritorious service, 1847 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 
1849-50; receiving-ship North Carolina, 1851 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, 
D. C, 1852-3 ; steamer Michigan, on the lakes, 1853-5 ; Marine Barracks, 
Philadelphia, 1856 ; commissioned as Captain and appointed Quartermaster of 
the Marine Corps, 1857; stationed at Philadelphia, from 1857 to 1869. 
16 



242 MARINE COEPS. 

CAPTAIN JAMES WILEY, ASSISTANT-QUAKTERMASTER. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Indiana; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 9th, 1847 ; frigate Brandywine, Brazil Squadron, 1847-9 ; 
frigate Constitution, Mediterranean Squadron, 1849-50 ; Marine Barracks, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1851; steam-frigate Saranac, Home Squadron, 1851-2; 
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1852 ; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 
1853-6; commissioned as First Lieutenant, September 27tli, 1856; Marine 
Barracks, Philadelphia, 1857-8; steam-frigate Wabash, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1858-9 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; battle 
of Port lloyal, etc. ; commissioned as Captain, and appointed Assistant-Quarter- 
master of the Marine Corps, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1862-3 ; 
San Francisco, Cal., 1863-7 ; New York, 1868. 



OFFICERS OF THE LINE. 



COLONEL MATTHEW R. KINTZING. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, September 8th, 1841 ; sloop Vincennes, Home Squadron, 
1841^ ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1845-6 ; sloop Grermantown, Home 
Squadron,during the war with Mexico; commissioned as First Lieutenant, July 
16th, 1847; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1849-50; sloop Saratoga, East 
India Squadron, 1850-3 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1854-6 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1856-7 ; sloop Cumberland, Coast of Africa, 
1857-9; commissioned as Captain, August 1st, 1860; steam-frigate Eoanoke, 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861; Mare Island, Cal., 1864-7 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, recruiting service, Philadelphia, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Cairo, Illinois, 
1863-4; commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel, June 10th, 1864; Marine Bar- 
racks, Philadelphia, 1867-9; commissioned as Colonel, December 5th, 1867. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JAMES H. JONES. 

Born in Delaware. Appointed from Delaware; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 2d, 1847; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1848; frigate 
Rantan, Home Squadron, 1849-50 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Home Squadron, 1851 ; 
Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1852; sloop Macedonian, East India Squadron, 
1852-4, and frigate Powhatan, East-India Squadron, 1855-6 ; commissioned as 
First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1853; receiving-ship Ohio, 1857-8; Marine 
Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1859; sloop Macedonian, Mediterranean Squad- 
ron, 1859-60 ; commissioned as Captain, May 7th, 1861 ; was present at the 
battle of Bull Run ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1861 ; steam-sloop 
Lancaster, Pacific Squadron, 1862-3; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washin<r- 
ton, D. C, 1864; commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel, June 10th, ISol- 
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-8; Marine Barracks, Mare Island' 
California, 1868-9. 



MAKINE CORPS. 243 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL CHARLES G. MoCAULEY. - 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Louisiana ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 3d, 1847 j with the army in Mexico, during the war; bre- 
vetted First Lieutenant for gallantry in action, 1847 ; frigate Cumberland, Medi- 
terranean Squadron, 1849-51 ; razee Independence, Mediterranean Squadron, 
1851-2; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1853; steamer Princeton, Home 
Squadron, 1854-5 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, January 2d, 1855 ; Ma- . 
rine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1856 ; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mas- 
sachusetts, 1857; sloop Jamestown, Home Squadron, 1858-60; sloop Macedo- 
nian, Atlantic Coast, 1861; brevetted Major for gallant and meritorious conduct; 
commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1862 ; 
Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1863 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 
1864 ; commissioned as Major, June 10th, 1864; recruiting rendezvous, Phila- 
delphia, 1865; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1865-9; commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant-Colonel, December 5th, 1867. 



MAJOR THOMAS Y. FIELD. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, March 3d, 1847 ; with the army in Mexico during the war ; 
brevetted First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct ; frigate Raritan, 
Pacific Squadron, 1850— 3; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1854-5 ; promoted 
to First Lieutenant, October 15th, 1854 ; sloop Constellation, Mediterranean 
Squadron, 1854-5 ; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mass., 1856-7 ; sloop St. 
Marys, Pacific Squadron, 1858-9 ; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1861 ; 
commissioned as Captain, May 30th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 
1862-3; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1864; commissioned as Major, June 
10th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1865 ; Marine 
Barracks, Philadelphia, 1866-7; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1868-9. 



MAJOR GEORGE R. GRAHAM. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia ; com- 
missioned as Second Lieutenant, July 27th, 1847 ; Marine Barracks, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1847-8 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1848-50 ; sloop St. Marys, 
Pacific Squadron, 1850-2; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1853-5; sloop 
Cyaue, Home Squadron, 1855-8; commissioned as First Lieutenant, October 
22d, 1856; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1859; steam-sloop IJrooklyn, 
Home Squadron, 1859-GO; commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1861; steam- 
sloop Brooklyn, Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 
1862 ; steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; com- 
missioned as Major, June 21st, 1864; headquarters, Washington, D. C., 1865-8; 
recruiting rendezvous, Washington, D. C., 1869. 



244 MABINE C0KP3. 

MAJOK JOHN L. BROOME. 



e 



BouN in New York, Appointed from New York ; commissioned as. Second 
Lieutenant, January 12th, 1848; sloop Marion, East India Squadron, 1849-52 
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1853-4; sloop Jotn Adams, Pacific Squad- 
ron 1854-5; Marine Barracks, PhiladelpMa, 1856-7 ; commissioned as First 
Lieutenant, September 28th, 1857; sloop John Adams, Pacific Squadron 
1857-8 • receiving-ship Pennsylvania, Norfolk, Va., 1859 ; sloop Portsmouth 
Coast of Africa, 1859-60 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, "West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 18G1 ; commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Hartford 
fla^'-ship West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; participated in all the 
important battles, including New Orleans, of Farragut's Squaidron in 1862-3 
received the brevets of Major and Lieutenant-Colonel for gallant and merito- 
rious conduct; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1864. Commissioned as 
Major, September 8th, 1864; Marine Barracks, Mound City, Illinois, 1864-5 ; 
Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1865-7 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
18G8-9. 



MAJOR JAMES LEWIS. 

BoKN in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, September 25th, 1855; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 
1856 ; steam-frigate Wabash, Home Squadron, 1856-8 ; Marine Barracks, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1859; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1859-69; frigate St. 
Lawrence, Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, July 
26th, 1861 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1862-3 ; rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1864-6 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1868-9; commis- 
sioned as Major, 1869. 



CAP TAI N S 



CAPTAIN CLEMENT D. HEBB. 



Born in Virginia. Appointed from California; commissioned aa Second 
Lieutenant, March 14th, 1856; sloop Falm«uth, Brazil Squadron, 1856-9; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1861 ; frigate Santee, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2 ; commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1861 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Gosport, Va., 1863 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. T., 1864 ; Marine 
Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1865; steam-frigate Colorado, flag- 
ship European Squadron, 1866-7 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, 
1868; Naval Station, Mound City, 111., 1868; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, 
Washington, 1869 ; at present, on duty at Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Pen- 
saoola, Florida. 



MARINE CORPS. 245 

CAPTAIN PHILIP K. FENDALL. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from California ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, October I7th, 1857 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 
1858 ; steam-frigate Merrimack, Pacific Squadron, 1858-60 ; commissioned as 
First Lieutenant, 1861 ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861, and West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; battle of Port 
Royal, etc.; commissioned as Captain, July 26th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, 
Mare Island, California, 18G3-5; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 18G6; 
Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1866-7; steam-sloop Guerriere, flag-ship South 
Atlantic Squadron, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN SCHERMERHORN. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Indiana ; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, January 10th, 1858 ; steamer Memphis, Brazil Squadron and Paraguay 
Expedition, 1858-9; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1861; sloop Vandalia, 
Blockading Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, November 16th, 1861 ; 
Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1862; steamer San Jacinto, East 
Gulf Squadron, 1862-3; steamer Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1863-4; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1864; 
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7; steam-sloop Pensacola, flag-ship 
North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES HEYWOOD. » 

Born in Maine. Appointed from New York; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, April 5th, 1858 ; frigate Niagara, special service, 1858 ; sloop St. Louis, 
Home Squadron, 1859-60 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1861 ; sloop 
Cumberland, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-2. 

Lieutenant Heywood was attached to the Cumberland when that vessel was sunk 
by the rebel ram Merrimack, and was favorably mentioned in the oflScial report 
of Lieutenant Morris, the commanding ofiicer of the Cumberland. 

Commissioned as Captain, November 22d, 1861 ; recruiting rendezvous, New 
York, 1862 ; frigate Sabine, special service, 1863 ; steam-sloop Hartford, flag- 
ship Farragut's Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Blobile Bay', etc.; received brevets 
of Major and Lieutenant-Colonel for distinguished gallantry in the presence of 
the enemy; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, 1866-7; steam- 
frigate Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1867-8; headquarters, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1869. 



CAPTAIN LUCIEN L. DAWSON. 

Born in Kentucky. Appointed from Texas; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, January 13th, 1859; steam-sloop Hartford, East India Squadron, 
1859-61 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, 
November 23d, 1861; steam-sloop San Jacinto, East Gulf Squadron, 1S62; re- 



246 MAKINE CORPS. 

cruiting rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1863 ; steam-frigate Colorado, North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; bombardment of and land assault on Eort Fisher; 
brevetted Major for gallant and meritorious service; Marine Barracks, Pensa- 
cola, Pla., 1865-6; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1867-8; steam-frigate 
Franklin, flag-ship European Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN GEORaE BUTLEE. <- 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Arkansas ; commis?ioned as 
Second Lieutenant, February 11th, 1859 ; Mediterranean Squadron, 1859-60 ; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, July 9th, 1861 ; steam-frigate Niagara, Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as Captain, November 4th, 18G2 ; Marine 
Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1862-4 ; steam-frigate Blinnesota, North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5; two attacks on Fort Fisher, and land 
assault on the same ; brevetted Major for bravery in action ; Marine Barracks, 
Boston, Mass., 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Contoocook, flag-ship North Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1868; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE W. COLLIER. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland; commissio^ied as Second 
Lieutenant, September 5th, 1860; steam-frigate Minnesota, Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-2; commissioned as First Lieutenant, September Itt, 1861: 
Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, ISGl— 4; commissioned as Cap- 
tain, November 4th, 1862; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1864-7 
steam-sloop Piscataqua, flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1S67-9. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE P. HOUSTON. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, October 23d, 1860 ; sloopJamestown, 1860-2 ; commissioned 
as First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861; steam-sloop Wachusett, West India 
Squadron, 1862-3; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Pensacola, 1863; commis- 
sioned as Captain, February 6th, 1864; steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron, 1864; battle of Mobile Bay, etc.; brevetted Major, for 
gallant and meritorious services ; steam-sloop Brooklyn, North Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron, 1864-5 ; recruiting rendezvous, Philadelphia, 1866-7 ; stcam- 
frigate Minnesota, special cruise, 1867-8 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New 
York, 1868-9. 



MARINE CORPS. 247 

CAPTAIN JAMES FORNEY. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned ns 
Second Lieutenant, March 1st, 1861; steam-frigate lloanoke, Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, 1861; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Septem?jer 1st, 1861 ; 
steam-sloop Brooklyn, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-8 ; battlesof New 
Orleans, Port Hudson, Vicksburg, ram Arkansas, etc. Lieutenant Forney, 
while attached to West Gulf Blockading Squadron, was handsomely mentioucd 
ia the official reports of the different battles in -which he took part, and was 
brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious service. Commissioned as Captain, 
April 23d, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Hartford, 
flag-ship Asiatic Squadron, 1865-8 ; brevetted Blajor, for gallant conduct in 
the affair at Formosa, in 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1869. 



CAPTAIN McLANB TILTON. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 2d, 1861 ; steam-frigate Colorado, West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861 ; commissioned as ' First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; 
Marine Barracks, Pensacola, Fla., 1862-3 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. 
C, 1864-5; commissioned as Captain, June 10th, 1864; commanding Marine 
Guard, at Naval Academy, 1866-9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. HIGBEE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 9th, 1861 ; sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1861-2; commissioned as First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; steam- 
sloop Hartford, flag-ship West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; brevetted 
Captain for gallantry in battle. May 25th, 1863 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, 
New York, 1864; commissioned as Captain, June 10th, 1864; Marine Bar- 
racks, Gosport, Va., 1865; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1866 ; re- 
cruiting rendezvous, New York, 1867; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 
1868-9. 



CAPTAIN FRANK MUNROE. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia ; com- 
missioned as Second Lieutenant, June 5th, 1861'; Marine Barracks, Washington, 
D. C. ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, 
Gosport, Va., 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Cairo, Illinois, 1863 ; iron-clad Roanoke, 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4; commissioned as Captain, June 
10th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1865 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, 
flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron, 1865-7; Headquarters, Washington, D. C, 
1868; Marine Barracks, Pensacola, Fla., 1869. 



248 MAEINE CORPS. 

CAPTAIN EOBEET W. HUNTINGTON. 

Born in Conneoticut. Appointed from Connecticut ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 5tli, 1861; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1861 ; was 
attached to Marine Battalion at battle of Bull Run ; commissioned as First Lieu- 
tenant, September 1st, 1861 ; served in Marine Battalion, co-operating with 
South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2; sloop Jamestown, East India Squadron, 
1SG2-5; commissioned as Captain, June 21st, 1864; Marine Barracks, Brook- 
lyu, New York, 1866; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7; Marine 
Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1867; headquarters, "Washington, D. C, 1867-8; 
Marine Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1868-9; at present, attached to steam- 
sloop Lancaster, flag-ship South Atlantic Squadron. 



CAPTAIN JOSEPH P. BAKER. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois ; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, June 5th, 1861 ; sloop Congress, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-2; engagement with rebel ram Merrimack, March 8th, 1862. 

By his gallant bearing in the action with the Merrimack, Lieutenant Baker won 
honorable mention in the official report of the affair; commissioned as First 
Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1862-3; 
steam-frigate Niagara, special service, 1864-5 ; commissioned as Captain, June 
22d, 1864; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1866; headquarters, Washington, 
D. C, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1867-8; Marine Barracks, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1868; steam-sloop Severn, flag-ship North Atlantic 
Squadron, 1869. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM H. PARKER. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Wisconsin ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 5th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Washiiigton, D. C, 1861 ; com- 
missioned as First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Brook- 
lyn, New York, 1862; steamer Vanderbilt, special cruise, 1863^; commis- 
sioned as Captain, December 8th, 18G4 ; North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1861-5 ; two attacks on Fort Fisher, and land assaults on the same ; brevetted 
Major for gallant and meritorious conduct; Marine Barracks, Mound City, 
Illinois, 1866-7 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship South Pacific Squadjon, 
1868—9. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. GRIMES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Iowa ; commissioDed as Second Lieu- 
tenant, June 5th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1861 ; commis- 



MARINE CORPS. 249 

sioned as First Lieutenant, September 1st, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, 
Va., 1862-3 j steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1863-6 ; commissioned 
as Captain, August 13th, 1865; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, Calii'ornia, 
1866-9. 



CAPTAIN HENRY A. BARTLETT. » 

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, November 24th, 1861; headquarters, Washington, D. C, 
1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; iroo-clad frigate 
New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; Lieutenant Bart- 
lett participated in all the most important operations of the South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1865 ; Marine 
Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1866; steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise, 
1867; commissioned as Captain, November 29th, 1867; steam-sloop Contoocook, 
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES A. STILLMAN. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut ; commissioned as Second 
liieutenant, November 24th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November 
25th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H , 1862 ; steam-frigate Colorado, 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New 
York, 1864 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag- 
sh.ip Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Captain, December 5th, 1867 ; 
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1867-9. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM R. MoKEAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, November 27th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem- 
ber 25th, 1861 ; Blarine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1863-5; steam-sloop Brooklyn, 
Brazil Squadron, 1865-7; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9; commis- 
sioned as Captain, 1869. 



CAPTAIN HORATIO B. LOWRY. 

Born in Vermont. Appointed from South Carolina ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem- 
ber 26th, 1861; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1861; steam-frigate 
Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; brevetted 
Captain for gallant and meritorious service, September 8th, 1863 ; Marine 



250 MARINE CORPS. 



Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1864-5 ; store-ship New Hampshire, South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; receiving-ship New Hampshire, Nor- 
folk, Va., 1866 ; Marine Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1867 ; receiving-ship 
Vermont, New York, 1867-8 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; at pre- 
sent, attached to frigate Sabine, special cruise; commissioned as Captain, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT FREDERICK H. CORRIE. 

Born in New York. Appointed from Kentucky; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem- 
ber 26th, 1861 ; Marine Battalion, serving in South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2; 
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, 
California, 1862-4 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron, 1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc., brevetted Captain for gallant and 
meritorious conduct; Marine Barracks, G-osport, Va., 1866-7 ; receiving-ship 
New Hampshire, Norfolk, Va., 1868 ; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 
1868-9 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Juniata, European Fleet. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT PERCIVAL C. POPE. * 

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New Hampshire ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 
November 26th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-4; brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious service, Sep- 
tember 8th, 1863; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Blassaohusetts, 1864-7; 
steam-sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Susque- 
hanna, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; Marine Barracks, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM R. BROWN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 
1862; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1802-4 ; commissioned 
as First Lieutenant, August 18th, 1862 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1864-9. 



MAEINE CORPS. 251 

FIRST LIEUTENANT RICHARD 8. COLLUM. « 

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, November 25th, 1861; frigate St. Lawrence, East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1861-3; commissioned as First Lieutenant, December .30th, 1862; 
Marine Barracks, Cairo, 111., 1864; iron-clad frigate New Ironsides, North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc.; Marine Bar- 
racks, Washington, D. C, 1865-7; Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Blound 
City, Itr, 1868; steam-sloop Richmond, European Fleet, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT NORVAL L. NOKES. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia ; com- 
missioned as Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; Marine Barracks, 
Brooklyn, New York, 1862; sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 
1863; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 30th, 1868; steam-sloop Pensa- 
cola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, 
D. 0., 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1860-8 ; bead- 
quarters, Washington, D. C, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM B. RBMEY. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa; commissioned as Second Lieutenant, 
November 25th, 1861 ; frigate Sabine, special service, 1862-3 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Gosport, Va., 1864; receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1865; 
steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; receiving-ship New 
Hampshire, Norfolk, Va., 1868; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9; at 
present, on special duty at Washington, D. C. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT HENRY J. BISHOP. 

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 
1862-3; store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4: 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 1st, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Ports- 
mouth, N. H., 1865-6; steam-sloop Susquehanna, special cruise, 1866-7, 
Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1867-8; Marine Barracks', 
Naval Station, Pensacola, Fla., 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT L. MEADE. 

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Tennessee ; commissioned 
as Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1862 ; 



252 MARINE CORPS. 

Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862-3 ; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1863 ; taken prisoner, September 7tli, 1863 ; in the night attack on 
Fort Sumpter, brevetted First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious services ; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 2d, 1864; Marine Barracks, Broiikiyn, 
New York, 1864-5; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1865-9; at 
present, on duty at Philadelphia. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT LYMAN P. FRENCH. . 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1863; 
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1863; steam-frigate Niagara, 
special service, 1863-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 1st, 18G4; 
iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7; Marine Barracks, Washington,©. 0., 1868; 
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIABI WALLACE. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, J). 
C, 1862-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 10th, 186-4; stearn-sloop 
Susquehanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 18G4-5 ; two attacks on 
Fort Fisher and land assault on the same ; Lieutenant Wallace was wounded 
and was brevetted Captain for gallantry ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil 
Squadron, 1865-6 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1867 ; headquarters, 
Washington, D. C, 1867; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; Marine 
Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT EDWARD C. SALTMARSH. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Blassachusetts ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washin"'- 
ton, D. 0., 1862-3 ; Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Pensacola, Fla., 1863 ; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 10th, LJ64; frigate Sabine, special 
service, 1864-5; Marine Barracks, Boston, Mas.iiichusetts, 1865-7; Slarine 
Barracks, Go.sport, Va., 1868; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES F. WILLIAMS. 

BOEN in Connecticut. Appointed from District of Columbia; commissioned 
as Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 18G2 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C. 



MARINE CORPS. 253 

1862 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1862-C ; Brazil Squadron, 1868-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 
10th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc. ; brevetted Captain for gallant and meritor- 
ious service; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C., 1865-8; steam-sloop Ply- 
mouth, European Squadron, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT EDWARD P. MEEKER. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey ; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; headquarters^ Washington, D. C, 1862 ; 
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1863-4; commissioned as First Lieu- 
tenant, September 17th, 1864; steam-frigate Colorado, North Atlantic Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Fort Fisher, etc.; brevetted Captain, for gal- 
lant and meritorious conduct ; steam-frigate, Colorado, flag-ship European Squad- 
ron, 186(>-7 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; Naval Station, Nor- 
folk, Ya, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT LOUIS E. FAGAN. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; headquarters, 1862; Marine Barracks, Phila- 
delphia, 1363 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlaatic Blockading Squad^- 
ron, 1863-4 ; brevetted First Lieutenant for gallantry in action ; North Atlan- 
tic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, and land as- 
sault on the same ; brevetted Captain for bravery in battle ; commissioned as 
First Lieutenant, December 8th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1865—6 ; 
special duty. New York, 1866-7 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
1867 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Blockading Squadron, 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES L. SHERMAN. 

Born in Michigan. Appointed from Michigan ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, July 12th, 1862 ; headquarters, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, 1863; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship West G ulf Blocka- 
ding Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay ; brevetted First Lieutenant for 
gallantry ; steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, December 8th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, 
Brooklyn, New York, 1865-7 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE M. WELLES. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, July 12th, 1862; headquarters, 1862; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, 



254 MARINE CORPS. 

New York, 1863; Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., 1864-5; commissioned as First 
Lieutenant, January 11th, 1865; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1865-7; 
Marine Barracks, Mare Island, California, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT HENRY C. COCHRANE. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as 
Second Lieutenant, March 10th, 1863 ; headquarters, 1863 ; Mississippi Squad- 
ron, 1864-5; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 20th, 1865; head- 
quarters, 1855-6; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1866; receiving-ship Con- 
stellation, Philadelphia, 1867 ; sloop Jamestown, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ; 
steam-sloop Saranae, Pacific Fleet, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE B. HAYCOCK. 

Born in Maine. Appointed from California ; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, March 18th, 1863; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1864-5; steam-sloop 
Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1865-9 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 
June 20th, 1866 ; at present, on duty at Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mass. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM S. MUSE. 

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 18G4-6; 
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 27th, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1867-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT ISRAEL H. WASHBURN. 

BoEN in Maine. Appointed from JIaine ; commissioned as Second Lieuten- 
ant, March 18th, 1864; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1864-5 ; steamer 
Rhode Island, flag-ship Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; Marine Barracks, Ports- 
mouth, N. H., 1867 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 29th, 1867 ; 
Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1868 ; Marine Barracks, Ports- 
mouth, N. H., 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT ALBERT B. YOUNG. 

Born in District of Colurnbia. Appointed from Massachusetts ; commissioned 
3 Second Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864; iron-clad frigate New Ironsides, North 



MARINE CORPS. 255 

Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship South 
Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November 29th, 
1867 ] headquarters, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, California, 18Q.8-9. 



FIKST LIEUTENANT FRANK D. WEBSTER. 

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire ; commissioned 
as Second Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mass., 
1864 j steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1864-7 ; Marine Bar- 
racks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1867-8 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 
December 5th, 1867 j Naval Station, Pensacola, Florida, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT JAMES D. B. BEBESE. 

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois ; commissioned as Second Lieu- 
tenant, March 18th, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, 1864-5; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1866; Marine Bar- 
racks, Brooklyn, New York, 1866-9; commissioned as First Lieutenant, May 
1st, 1868. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT A. S. TAYLOR. 

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey ; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, 
California, 1864r-8 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, July 30th, 1868 ; steam- 
sloop Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT JAMES M. T. YOUNG. 

Born in New York, Appointed from Maryland; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864; headquarters, 1864-5 ; Marine Barracks, Pensa- 
cola, 1865-6; headquarters, 1866-7; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 9th, 1868. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM B. MURRAY. 

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa; commissioned as Second Lieutenant 
July 2d, 1864; headquarters, 1864; Marine Barracks, Mound City, Illinois,^ 



256 MAKINE CORPS. 

1865-6 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-9 ; commis- 
sioned as First Lieutenant, 1869 ; at present, on duty at Marine Barracks, Mare 
Island, California. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE C. REID. 

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio ; commissioned as Second Lieutenant 
July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864-6 ; steam-sloop Monongahela, North At- 
lantic Squadron, 1867 ; appointed Aid-de-camp to Commandant, 1867 ; head- 
quarters, 1867-9; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1869. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT ERASTUS R. ROBINSON. 

Born in New York. Appointed from New York; commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, 
California, 1865; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; Marine Bar- 
racks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; steam-sloop Seminole, North Atlantic Squad- 
ron, 1869 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1869. 



A BRIEF HISTORY 

OP 

Naval Operations during the Rebellion. 



The war of the rebellion opened upon a people but ill-prepared for such a con- 
test, and in nothing was this want of preparation more manifest than in the con- 
dition of the navy. The limited number of ships and men at command, when 
the proclamation announcing the blockade of the Southern ports was issued, de- 
volved upon the Navy Department the necessity of calling into service, not only 
the entire available naval force, but also vessels from the commercial marine. Or- 
ders were issued to at once prepare for service all the public vessels which were 
lying dismantled at the various yards ; vessels of every kind that could be in any 
way rendered serviceable were purchased or chartered, and the force thus hurriedly 
collected was divided into two squadrons, and placed along the coast. One of 
these two, denominated the Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under command of 
Flag-Officer Charles Stringham, had for its field of operations the entire coast, 
from the eastern line of Virginia to Cape Florida. The other, the G-ulf Squad- 
ron, under Flag-Officer Wm. Mervine, operated from Cape Florida westward to 
the Rio Grande. 

The task of blockading the coast, an unattractive one enough, and one re- 
quiring unceasing vigilance, was carried out as effectually as the nature of the coast 
and the circumstances of the case would permit. The ports of North Carolina, 
situated within the shallow waters of the sounds, afforded peculiar facilities for 
the evasion of the blockade, as well as for annoying piratical enterprises, and 
accordingly an expedition was undertaken having for its object the occupation of 
the defences at Hatteras Inlet. Flag-Officer Stringham commanded in person 
the naval forces, and Major-General Butler the small military force, consisting 
of about 800 men, which was to co-operate with the navy on this occasion. 

The expedition left Hampton Roads on the 26th of August, 1861 ; it con- 
sisted of the flag-ship Minnesota, with four other U. S. steamers, and three 
chartered vessels, and two transport towing schooners with surf-boats. 

On the 27th, the fleet rounded Cape Hatteras, and anchored to the southward, 
and on the following morning the troops were landed without mishap, through 
a heavily rolling surf. The inlet was defended by two heavy batteries. Forts 
Hatteras and Clark, and against the latter of these the fire of the fleet was first 
directed — the Wabash and Cumberland opening at ten o'clock — and with the 
other vessels passing and repassing until shortly after noon, the flag on the fort 
was down and the rebels were seen running towards Fort Hatteras. The troops 
thereupon moved up the beach, and at two o'clock the American flag was flying over 
Fort Clark. Captain Gillis, of the Monticello, was ordered to feel his way into 
the inlet and take possession, but he had not advanced far when fire was opened 
on him from Fort Hatteras, whereupon a general engagement ensued, continu- 
ing until dark. Early the following morning, the fire was renewed and oon- 
17 C257~> 



258 NAVAL OPERATIONS DURING THE REBELLION. 

tinued with such effect that before noon a white flag was displayed from the 
fort, and the troops marched up; the crews of the squadron, spontaneously, though 
as if by a preconcerted signal, giving three hearty cheers. 

General Butler immediately went intb the inlet with his tug to take posses- 
sion, and shortly after returned to the flag-ship with the three senior officers of 
the Confederate army and navy, between whom and the commanders of the 
joint expedition terms of capitulation were drawn up. 

The loss in killed and wounded in the forts had been large, but although 
they had returned the fire of the squadron throughout the engagement, they 
had done so without effect, the shot for the most part falling short, and thus 
this important victory was achieved without a single casualty to any one upon 
the vessels or among the troops. Unfortunately the military force was insufficient 
to follow up the advantage thus gained by occupying a position on the main 
land, and important as was the occupation of the defences of Hatti-ras inlet, it 
was not until some time after that any very strong hold was obtained upon the 
coast of North Carolina. 

Another region which early taxed the energies of the navy was that of the 
lower Potomac, where it was necessary to place a flotilla. The duties of this 
flotilla were extremely embarassing, and it was evident that without the active 
co-operation of the army it would be impossible to prevent the obstruction of 
navigation by hostile batteries. For several months, however, the navy suc- 
ceeded in keeping the river open and restricting to a great extent communica- 
tion between the shores, until the close of October, 1861, when the rebels suc- 
ceeded in erecting batteries at various points on the Virginia shore, thus render- 
ing passage of the river dangerous. It was in the heroic discbarge of the 
annoying duties of his post that the first commander of the flotilla, Commander 
J. H. Ward, lost his life; the first officer of the navy killed in action during the 
rebellion. He was shot by a musket ball while sighting a gun, in an attempt 
to effect a landing at Matthias Point, where a formidable battery was afterwards 
erected. 

In spite of the continued increase of the squadrons, the labor of enforcing 
the blockade increased quite as rapidly, since the needs of the blockaded States 
called forth the most desperate efforts for their relief. The duties so imposed 
upon the flag-officers thus became more arduous and extensive than could well 
be performed by a single commander, and rendered a division of the squadrons 
necessary. Shortly after the capture of Hatteras Inlet, Flag-Officer Stringham 
relinquished his command, and the Atlantic Squadron was divided into two. 
Captain Louis M. Groldsborough was appointed to the command of the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, to guard the coast of Virginia and North Caro- 
lina, and raised his flag on the Minnesota, September 23d, 1861. The remain- 
der of the coast, from the northern boundary of South Carolina to Cape Florida, 
was entrusted to the squadron of the South Atlantic, under Captain Samuel F. 
Du Pont. At the same time, Captain William W. McKean relieved Flag-Officer 
Mervine from the command of the Gulf Squadron, the division of which was 
postponed until a larger force could be sent around the peninsula. This was 
consummated on the 21st of February, 1862, Flag-Officer McKean retaining 
command of the Eastern Gulf Squadron, whose limits embraced the Florida coast^ 
from Cape Canaveral to Pensacola. The Western Gulf Squadron guarded the 
coast from and including Pensacola, to the Rio Grande, including numerous im- 
portant harbors and the outlet of the great valley of the Mississippi. This most 
important command, which included the preparation of a great expedition for 
the capture of New Orleans, was entrusted to Captain D. G. Farragut. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 259 

In addition to the five large squadrons thus constituted upon the maritime 
frontier, it early became necessary to have an organized naval force on the Mis- 
sissippi and its tributaries; and on the 16th of May, 1861, Commander John 
Eodgers was directed to report to the War Department for the purpose of or- 
ganizing an armed flotilla on the western waters. He immediately proceeded 
to the West, purchased steamers, which were fitted and armed as gunboats, and 
commenced the organization of the Mississippi flotilla, which soon after made 
itself known by a succession of brilliant achievements. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

We have already spoken of the annoyance experienced at the commencement 
of the blockade, from vessels of light draught which made egress and ingress 
through the many sounds on the coast of North Carolina. The occupation of 
one of the most important inlets was not sufficient to exercise much control over 
these operations, and it early became necessary to gain possession of the im- 
portant points within the sounds. Flag-Officer Louis M. Groldsborough had, as 
has been stated, assumed command of the North Atlantic Squadron, in Sep- 
tember, 1861, and early in the following January a joint expedition of the navy 
and army, for operations in the waters of North Carolina, moved from Hampton 
Roads, under command of that officer and Brigadier-General A. E. Burnside, 
respectively. 

The naval force, consisting of seventeen light-draught. vessels, with an arma- 
ment of 48 guns, most of them of heavy calibre, arrived at Hatteras Inlet on 
the 13th, and in two days succeeded, with great difficulty, in passing over the 
bulkhead and through the narrow and tortuous channel. It was not, however, 
until some weeks later that the transports were able to surmount the obstacles 
and to be prepared for active co-operation, which period of delay was employed 
in obtaining information of the enemy's position and in forming plans for the 
attack. Roanoke Island lies between the two bodies of water known as Pamlico 
and. Albemarle sounds, being separated from the mainland by a shallow channel, 
Croatan sound. Opposite the southern extremity of the island the mainland 
juts out in a low marshy point, around which the vessels threaded their way, 
and on the morning of February 7th moved up Croatan sound in three columns, 
commanded respectively by Lieutenants Werden, Murray and Davenport, the 
whole under the immediate command of Commander S. C. Rowan. The enemy 
had formed an extensive obstruction, of a double row of piles and sunken vessels, 
stretching across the sound between the batteries on Pork and Wier points, and 
behind this their vessels, eight in number, were drawn up. By half-past ten 
o'clock the squadron had approached near enough to begin the attack, directing 
most of its fire against the fort on Pork Point, but not neglecting the vessefi 
or the other works, all of which returned the fire, though with but slight 
effect. By noon the engagement had become general, and was continued so hotly 
that at two o'clock the battered barracks behind the fort were burning furiously, 
and at half-past four the batteries for the most part ceased for a while, to reply 
to the firing of the fleet ; five of the enemy's steamers, apparently injured, 
retired behind the point, and the first landing of troops took place. Throughout 
the sound the depth of water is but slight, and even at the distance of a mile or 
more from the shore it scarcely exceeds a general depth of seven feet. As noua 



260 NOETH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

of the vessels, with one or two exceptions, drew less than this amount of water, 
and some of them drew more than eight feet, the discretion of their commanders 
was taxed to the utmost in placing them so that their guns would tell effectively. 
The landing was effected, in light-draught steamers and boats, at Ashby's 
harbor, a large body of the enemy guarding the shore being soon cleared away 
by some shrapnels from the guns of the Delaware. At five o'clock the batteries 
again opened, and the vessels of the enemy again came out, but were soon com- 
pelled to retire, and at six, the firing being only from Pork Point and at long 
intervals, the signal to cease firing was made. By midnight some 10,000 troops 
had been safely landed at Ashby's harbor, where they were joined by six 
launches from the fleet, with their howitzers, to hold the road during the night, 
and be ready for active operations in the morning. 

It was arranged by General Burnside that his forces should move at a very 
early hour on the morning of the 8th, and begin their attack upon the enemy ; 
and it was agreed that, as the direction they would have to take would probably 
soon bring them into the line of fire of the fleet, the vessels should not renew 
operations until it was known that their fire would not be destructive to friend 
and foe alike. At nine o'clock, a continuous firing in the interior of the island an- 
nounced that the army was hotly engaged about midway between the landing and 
Pork Point, and the vessels at once moved up to re-engage the forts. This they 
continued until the firing in the interior slackened, when, taking it for granted 
that General Burnside was carrying everything before him and approaching the 
rear of the batteries, Flag-Officer Goldsborough gave the order to desist, and pro- 
ceeded to the task of clearing a passage-way through the obstructions. By four 
o'clock this was accomplished, and at about the same time that the vessels 
succeeded in bursting through the barricades, the American flag was unfurled 
over the battery on Pork Point. A few minutes afterwards the enemy himself 
fired the works on Redstone Point, together with a steamer which had taken 
refuge under its guns, and thus ended the eventful struggle of two days, which 
secured complete possession of the island of Koanoke./ 

Retreating from Roanoke Island, the rebel naval fleet fled up the sound and 
into Pasquotank river, towards Elizabeth City, Commander Rowan pursuing 
them with a flotilla of fourteen vessels, and anchoring for the night a few miles 
from Port Cobb. On the morning of the 10th, the rebel steamers were dis- 
covered drawn up behind the battery, which mounted four heavy guns, and sup- 
ported by a schooner — the Black Warrior — moored to the opposite bank, and 
carrying two heavy 32-pounder3. When within long range fire was opened 
from the battery, the schooner and the steamers; but the vessels moved on 
silently and steadily, shot and shell falling thick and fast among them. When 
within three-quarters of a mile of the battery. Commander Rowan gave the signal 
for a dash at the enemy; fire was opened with telling effect, and the vessels put at 
their utmost speed. The enemy was completely demoralized by this bold and 
wholly unexpected movement; the Black Warrior was set on fire by her officers 
and destroyed, the fort abandoned, and the entire fleet captured or destroyed. 

Passing up the river the flotilla took possession of Elizabeth City, which the 
enemy had attempted to fire before hastily leaving it, and Lieut. Murray was 
dispatched with a small force to Edenton, of which he quietly took possession 
on the 12_th, and was then sent to obstruct the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal, 
a duty which he successfully accomplished. At the same time. Commander Rowan 
made a reeonnoissance of the Chowan river as far as Win ton, where a sharp engage- 
ment took place on the 19th, but which was, the following morning, occupied by 
the troops under Col. Hawkins, who entered the town and destroyed the military 
stores and quarters found there. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 261 

riag-Officer Goldsborougli having been recalled to Hampton Roads, leaving 
Commander Rowan in command of the naval forces in the sound, a combined 
expedition of the navy and army, under that officer and General Burnside, left 
Hatteras Inlet on the morning of the 12th of March, for an attack upon Newborn, 
N. C. The fleet, numbering fourteen sail, besides the transports, entered the Neuse 
river in the afternoon, and at nightfall anchored in three columns off Slocum's 
creek, the point selected for the debarkation of the troops, about fifteen miles 
distant from Newbern. Early the following morning the gunboats were deployed 
at either side of the mouth of the creek, and opened with grape and canister 
upon the landing place, while the troops started from the transports, the fire 
ceasing as soon as the first brigade had landed. At the same time six naval boat 
howitzers, under command of Lieutenant R. S. McOook, were sent ashore to 
assist in the attack upon the enemy's works. As soon as all the troops had em- 
barked, the flag-ship, with another vessel, proceeded on a reconnoissance up the 
river, where fire was opened upon it by the battery Fort Dixie, and a spirited 
fire was kept up until dark, when all the vessels anchored for the night in a 
position to support the troops on shore. At daylight, on the morning of the 14th, 
General Burnside engaged the enemy in force, and Commander Rowan advanced 
steadily up the river with his fleet. The passage of the river was obstructed by 
a formidable line of piles and torpedoes, and defended by six well constructed 
forts, at distances of half a mile to a mile and a-half from each other, mounting 
some thirty-two heavy guns ; but under pressure of the combined attack the rebels 
abandoned their defences in succession, the army and navy contesting the honor 
of raising the American flag on their ramparts, so that at noon the fleet arrived 
before the deserted town of Newbern. The attempt had been made by the re- 
treating enemy to fire the fbwQ, as was not unusual during the war, but the 
injury effected was not great, except that the railroad bridge was destroyed by 
fire communicated from a raft loaded with cotton, saturated with turpentine, which 
had been prepared to send down against the fleet. A large quantity of public 
stores fell into the hands of the navy, and were turned over to the victorious 
troops, who arrived and took possession of the town at two o'clock. 

After the fall of Newbern, Lieut. Commanding Murray was dispatched with 
a naval column, accompanied by a detachment of troops, to take possession of 
"Washington, N. C, which he did without opposition on the 21st, the defences 
of the town having been abandoned, and most of the arms and stores removed 
or destroyed. Lieut. Murray was met at the wharf by the authorities, to whom 
he explained the object of his visit, and then proceeded with the troops to the 
court house, where the American flag was raised with all the ceremonies. The 
occupation of Washington restored to the government the important Hatteras 
light-house property, the most valuable portion of which, however, the lenses, had 
been removed by the rebels to Tarboro before his approach. On the 1st of April, 
Commander Rowan dispatched to New York and Philadelphia nine vessels 
freighted with prize naval stores, some of the fruits of the capture of Newbern. 

Fort Macon, Beaufort harbor, was the next object which engaged the atten- 
tion of the army and navy. On the morning of the 25th April, fire was opened 
upon the fort from the batteries on shore, and Commander Samuel Lookwood, 
the senior officer of the blockading fleet off Beaufort, prepared his vessels for 
action and proceeded within range of the fort, his three steamers, the Daylight,- 
State of Georgia and Chippewa, steaming round in a circle, and delivering their 
shot as they came within range, at a distance of a mile and a quarter from the 
fort. The firing continued for an hour and a quarter, when the heavy sea 
rendering the guns unmanageable, the navy was obliged to withdraw, hoping 
that a subsidence of the wind would enable him to renew the action in the 



262 NOKTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

afternoon. The wind and sea, however, increased in violence, rendering a renewal 
of the engagement on the part of the navy impossible ; but toward evening a 
flag of truce appeared on the fort, and on the following morning the gallant 
fellows, who had been reluctantly compelled to leave the action, where their fire 
had rendered most essential service in withdrawing the fire of the enemy from 
the land batteries, were enabled heartily to cheer the reappearance of the old 
flag over the ramparts of Fort Macon. Entering the fort, Commander Rowan 
had an interview with General Burnside, with whom he signed the terms of 
capitulation on the part of the United States. It is not a little remarkable 
that this important post should have been taken with a loss of but one killed 
and two wounded in the army, and a single officer wounded in the naval 
forces. 

At the same time, Commander Rowan, finding that the army had failed to 
accomplish the object for which it was landed at Elizabeth city, and had 
returned without destroying the canals, determined to undertake this duty 
with the navy, and accordingly sent Lieutenant Hurser with the three gunboats 
and two schooners, one carrying apparatus for blowing up the banks, and the 
other filled with sand to block up the Albemarle and Chesapeake canal. This 
he successfully performed, by sinking the sand schooner at the mouth of the 
canal, and obstructing the passage for fifty yards with brush, stumps and earth, 
accomplishing in two days what many months' labor could hardly undo. 
The same officer also, during the following season, rendered varied service in the 
neighboring waters, in the destruction of stores, etc., and in the recovery of the 
Wade's Point light-house apparatus, which was found stored in a barn near 
Elizabeth city, and in numerous expeditions to points upon the sound. 

While the operations we have recorded were in progress, most exciting scenes 
had been enacted in Hampton Roads. On the 8th of March, one of the look- 
out vessels of the squadron lying there reported, by signals, that the enemy was 
coming out from the James river; and soon the iron-plated steam-battery Merri- 
mack, accompanied'ijy several small gunboats, was seen passing Sewell's Point 
and standing toward Newport -News. Passing close by the frigate Congress, to 
which she delivered a destructive broadside, this formidable monster bore down 
upon the Cumberland sloop-of-war, in command, in the temporary absence of 
Commander Radford, of Lieut. George U. Morris. The Cumberland at once 
opened fire, but entirely without efiect, upon her antagonist, which stood on and 
struck her under the starboard fore-channels, at the same time delivering her fire. 
The destruction was terrible. So great, indeed, was the injury inflicted by this 
crushing blow, that notwithstanding the pumps were kept actively at work, the 
water rose rapidly in the hold, and in about two hours had drowned the forward 
magazine. All this time the gallant crew had kept up an active fire, and did 
not desist until, at 3.35 P. M., when the water had risen to the main hatchway, the 
ship canted to port, and after a parting volley, each man took his chance of life 
by jumping overboard. All of the wounded who were able to walk had been 
ordered up, but those who had been carried into the sick-bay were so mangled 
that it was impossible to save them, and they were left to go down with the 
vessel they had served so well. Of the gallantry of this action, which has fur- 
nished one of the brightest, as well as one of the saddest pages to the naval his- 
tory of the world, it is difficult to speak in fitting terms; and perhaps no better 
words can be found than the simple sentence in which Lieut. Morris concluded 
his report to his commanding officer, who arrived at Newport News only in time 
to see his vessel go down : " I will only say, in conclusion, that all did their duty, 
and we sank with the American flag at the peak." The Cumberland lost more 
than a hundred men, nearly one-third of her crew. 



NOETH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 263 

While tbe Merrimack was engaged with the Cumberland, the smaller vessels 
accompanjing her attacked the Congress, killing and wounding many of her 
crew ; and her commander, seeing the fate of the Cumberland, set sails, and 
with the assistance of a tug, ran the vessel ashore. At half-past three the Mer- 
rimack took position astern of her at a distance of a hundred and fifty yards, and 
raked her with shells ; one of the smaller steamers meanwhile keeping up a fire 
on her starboard quarter, and two others approaching from up the James river, 
opening fire with precision and doing great damage. The two stern guns were 
now the only means of defence left the Congress, and these were soon disabled, 
one being dismounted and the other having its muzzle knocked away, and the 
men were swept away from them rapidly and with terrible slaughter by the cruel 
fire of the enemy. 

Meanwhile, the steam-frigate Roanoke, the vessel of Capt. Marston, the 
senior officer, and the Minnesota, the most powerful vessel in the Eoads, were 
aground at some miles' distance ; and Lieut. Pendergrast, on whom, at the death 
of Lieut. Smith, who fell at his post, at half-past 4 o'clock, devolved the com- 
mand of the Congress, seeing the rapid slaughter of his men, without any pros- 
pect of relief, and being unable to bring his guns to bear upon the enemy, 
while his ship was on fire in several places, concluded to haul down his colors, 
and suffer no further loss of life. An officer from the Merrimack boarded the 
vessel, and soon after a tug came along-side, whose captain demanded of the 
crew to surrender and leave the ship, as he intended to burn her imme- 
diately. A sharp fire from the troops on the shore, however, soon compelled 
the tug to leave, and the Merrimack again fired several shell, after which she 
hauled off to engage the Minnesota, and Lieut. Pendergrast, left to himself, made 
all haste to get his men ashore, the ship being on fire in several places, and near 
the magazine. 

The Minnesota, upon the first appearance of the battery, had got under way 
to engage her, but after proceeding to within a mile and a-half of Newport 
News, had there grounded, and as the tide was ebbing she could not be floated off. 
Here, then, the great frigate lay at 4 o'clock, when the Merrimack, with her two 
consorts, leaving the Congress to her fate, bore down upon her. Fortunately, 
however, the iron battery drew too much water to come within a mile of her ; 
but the two other steamers, firing rifled guns, did much damage in killing and 
wounding men, until the heavy gun of the Minnesota drove them off, followed 
at 7 o'clock by the Merrimack, when all three steamed towards Norfolk. 

The firing of her broadside guns had crowded the Minnesota still further 
upon the mud bank, and although all hands were at work during the night with 
tugs and hawsers, it was found impossible to move her. The situation of the 
vessel, hopelessly grounded, with the certainty of the renewal of the attack by 
her apparently invulnerable antagonist in the morning, was unpleasant in the 
extreme ; but at midnight a new and powerful actor arrived upon the scene. The 
iron-clad Monitor, Commander John L. Worden, the first of three iron-clad ves- 
sels which had been built by the Navy Department, had arrived, most oppor- 
tunely, at Hampton Roads, at 9 o'clock, and immediately received orders from 
Captain Marston to proceed to Newport News and protect the Minnesota from 
the attack of the Merrimack ; and all untried as the strange little craft was, 
she was warmly welcomed as she anchored alongside. 

At eight o'clock the following morning the Merrimack was perceived ap- 
proaching. When she had come within a mile of the Minnesota, that vessel 
opened upon her and signaled the Monitor to attack. Then came the contest 
which was to exert so important an influence upon naval architecture. Running 
down the wake of the frigate, the tiny Monitor placed herself alongside of her 



264 NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

huge antagonist and fired gun after gun, which were returned by whole broad- 
sides without efiect. After a time the little vessel began maneuveriDg, shooting 
by her antagonist and sending her shots first into her bow, and again raking her 
stern, while broadside after broadside was fired from the Merrimack, either pass- 
ing quite over, or, if they struck, glancing harmless from her bomb-proof turret. 

Finding that she could make no impression on the Monitor, the Merrimack 
again gave her attention to the Minnesota, returning a tremendous broadside from 
the frigate with a shot from her rifled bow gun, which went crashing through 
the vessel, bursting in the boatswain's room and setting fire to the ship. The 
fire was, however, promptly extinguished. Her second shell exploded the boiler 
of the tugboat alongside ; but an incessant fire from the frigate was now concen- 
trated upon her, some fifty solid shot striking upon her sides, without^ however, 
any apparent effect. The Monitor by this time again came between the con- 
tending vessels, forcing the battery to change her position. In doing this she 
grounded, and the broadsides of the Minnesota were again poured upon her. As 
soon as she got off she stood down the bay, chased at full speed by the Monitor. 
Suddenly she turned and made for her antagonist, but a plunging shot through 
the roof arrested her dash, and for a time the encounter between this seemingly 
ill-matched pair was again hot and furious. After a time the Merrimack seemed 
to tire of the fray, and again headed toward the frigate. It was a trying moment 
for the Minnesota, fast aground and badly crippled ; but the enemy had no mind 
to renew the experience of the morning, and, it being then shortly after noon, 
retreated to Sewell's Point. During the night Captain Van Brunt succeeded 
in getting his ship afloat, and next morning was safely at anchor near Fortress 
Monroe. 

Toward the close of this terrific engagement, a percussion shell exploded 
against the look-out chink of the pilot house of the Monitor, where Captain 
Worden, who so brilliantly fought his little vessel, and who thus made him- 
self in a few hours the hero of the day, was stationed throughout the engagement. 
The result was a severe injury to the eyes of that officer, which, with the effects 
of the concussion, so disabled him as to oblige him to place the vessel in com- 
mand of Lieutenant Greene, executive officer, and to be subsequently removed 
to Washington. One officer and one seaman were also injured by concussion 
during the day, the only casualties on board the Monitor, whose impregnability 
was thus abundantly proven. This remarkable combat operated in a great 
degree to alter the ideas of the whole world in regard to naval operations, and 
its influence was immediately apparent in the construction of vessels, not only 
by the American Navy but by those of European nations, though it is doubtful 
whether it effected so great a revolution in naval affairs as was at the time 
anticipated. The capacities of the Monitor class are more limited than they 
were, after this affair, supposed to be, but we shall have abundant instances of 
their achievements to note in the course of our record. 

The arrival of the Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula rendered it neces- 
sary to detail several gunboats from the North Atlantic Squadron, to convoy the 
transports and to protect the flank of the army on its march. Gen. McClellan 
occupied Yorktown, May 4th, and immediately afterwards telegraphed to Comman- 
der William Smith to come up and assist in the communication with Gloucester. 
Commander Smith accordingly proceeded up York river with his flotilla, and 
was enabled to render the army valuable assistance. On the 7th, the enemy, 
in large force, attacked Gen. Franklin's division, the right wing of the army, at 
West Point, and he having requested the assistance of the navy, Commander 
Smith dispatched the Wachusett, Maratanza and Sebago to his support. These 
gunboats, taking position near the rebels, opened upon them with great effect, 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 265 

giving most essential aid to Gen. Franklin, and enabling him to hold his posi- 
tion and repel the attack. 

On the 8th of May, the Monitor moved up and shelled Sewell's Point. 
The Merrimack came out, but though the Monitor kept well up toward her, 
she refused to engage her plucky adversary, and soon retired under the 
point. This was her last appearance, for two days after Norfolk surrendered 
to the military forces under G-en. Wool, and the next morning a terrific explo- 
sion, in the direction of Craney Island, announced to the navy in Hampton 
Eoads that the once dreaded battery was no more. Lieut. Selfridge, of the 
flag-officer's staff, proceeding in a tug to Sewell's Point, raised the American 
flag over the abandoned works, and the ships sailed up to Norfolk unmolested. 

Two days before the fall of Norfolk, three gunboats, the G-alena, Aroostook and 
Port Royal, under Commander John Kodgers, were sent up the James river, in 
accordance with the orders of the President. On the 11th, the Monitor and Nau- 
gatuok joined the expedition at Jamestown Island, and the little squadron, after 
numerous engagements with the enemy's batteries and sharp-shooters, arrived at 
Drury's Bluff, eight miles from Kichmond, where they encountered a heavy battery 
and two barriers formed of piles and sunken vessels. The Galeaa and Monitor ran 
within six hundred yards of the Bluff, but the latter was obliged to drop down 
again some distance, being unable to elevate her guns sufficiently to make them 
tell efficiently upon the battery. After an action of three hours the gunboats, 
having exhausted their ammunition, returned to City Point, the Naugatuck disa- 
bled by the bursting of a gun. Other expeditions were also made up the James 
and Pamunkey, and other rivers, during the summer, though none of them 
were important in their results. 

On the 5th of September, Bear Admiral Goldshorough was, at his own re- 
quest, relieved of command of the North Atlantic Squadron, by Acting Bear 
Admiral P. P. Lee. The operations of the squadron during the remainder of 
the year embrace nothing of special importance, with the exception of two or 
three incidents, which, although without practical results, deserve more than a 
mention by reason of the courage and gallantry displayed in them. The opera- 
tions to which we allude were those of the fleet in the waters of North Caro- 
lina, at that time under Commander S. K. Davenport. The intricacies of 
these waters called for continual activity on the part of the naval force, more 
especially as the army, scattered at a number of points, was frequently in need 
of support; as on one occasion, the 6th of September, when the enemy attacked 
and entered the town of Washington, and would probably have obtained posses- 
sion of this important point, but for the timely action of Lieut. Benshaw, of 
the gunboat Louisiana, who immediately opened fire and soon succeeded in 
driving the rebels from the town. The navy also, upon numerous other occa- 
sions, rendered very material assistance to the army in its movements. 

Major General Dix having requested the co-operation of a naval expedition in 
a proposed attack upon Franklin, Va., a town upon the Blackwater river, about 
twenty miles above its confluence with the Chocan, and somewhat more than 
that distance southwest from Portsmouth, Lieut. Commander Flusser, of the 
Perry, was directed to act in concert with the land forces. The expedition, con- 
sisting of the Perry, Hunchback, Acting Lieut. Commander Colhoon, and the 
Whitehead, Acting Master French, ascended the river on October 2d, and lay 
over night within three miles of the town. Very early next morning the vessels 
got under way, but the stream was narrow and very tortuous, the banks high 
and offering safe refuge for the riflemen of the enemy, who kept up a contin- 
uous scattered fire upon the crews. The vessels were several times aground, 
and the barricades placed in the channel helped to make a passage almost im- 



266 NORTH ATLANTIC SQtIADEON. 

possible. But courage and determination forced a way through every difficulty, 
until the town was almost within sight. But here a fresh impediment was en- 
countered, a barricade which it was impossible to pass or to remove under such 
a fire, and so all further progress was stopped. The long expected fire of the 
co-operating land forces was now opened, and the enemy seemed determined to 
make it impossible to move backward as well as forward. After the woods had 
been well shelled in every direction, the vessels were ordered to drop down 
the narrow, winding channel with high bluffs on either side. Under a heavy 
fire of musketry, and over and through all obstructions made by the enemy, 
the gallant little vessels pushed on, and at nightfall reached the point from which 
they started. Like many another expedition at this time, this one_ proved 
almost barren of results, beyond the confidence in themselves and in their 
leaders which was inspired in the men. Several of them are reported as worthy 
of especial commendation. One swam ashore with a line through a heavy fire; 
another put out the burning fuse of a shell which had dropped on the deck ; 
and so of others. Lieut. Gushing was especially commended to the notice of 
the Department. 

An expedition, undertaken by Lieut. Gushing, of the steamer Ellis, was 
boldly conceived and carried out with great spirit. The object was the destruc- 
tion of salt works and of vessels engaged in contraband trade, and the capture 
of mail matter and public property at Jacksonville, in all of which it was very 
successful. Entering the New river inlet on the morning of November 23d, 
Lieut. Gushing burned a valuable outward-bound trader, captured other 
schooners, and had the happiness of seeing the county town in possession of his 
men. There they found a valuable mail made up for Wilmington, and also some 
public arms; but such men and officers as were in the town escaped. No time 
was to be lost, however, and at 2 P. M. the Ellis started to return, but this_ did 
not prove to be so easily accomplished. The enemy had put guns in position 
at several places; and near where the vessel fired in the morning was still 
burning they collected in some force, but were put to flight after a few 
rounds of shell. Unfortunately, daylight began to fail before the mouth of the 
river was reached, and the two pilots declared it impossible to pass through a 
narrow and crooked channel, except by day and with high water. So the night 
had to be passed at anchor, with the enemy in force on either bank ; but it 
was better to risk a night attack than to lose the vessel on the rocks. How- 
ever, the enemy kept quiet till morning ; but grew troublesome when the ves- 
sel got under way, and soon opened a battery of two pieces. A sharp fight 
followed; but the rebels were driven from their guns, and all would have gone 
well, for the Ellis was but five miles from the bar, had not the pilots, mistaking 
the channel, run the vessel hard and fast aground. All attempts to lighten her 
proved in vain. Everything was removed except the pivot gun and a few 
stores ; six men volunteered to remain with the commander, and all the rest were 
allowed to go aboard the schooner, and it dropped down out of reach of 
the shot. 

In the morning the enemy opened a heavy cross-fire, which soon disabled the 
engine, and before long, cut up the vessel in every part, but the brave little 
crew held to their gun as long as it could be worked. The time came at 
last, however, when they must either surrender, or undertake a perilous escape 
in the small boat, and this the gallant commander resolved to attempt, though 
escape from a fire concentrated from every side seemed hardly to be dreamed of. 
The vessel was fired in five places, and the little crew managed to reach the 
prize in safety, and the schooner was quickly on her way to sea, but did not 
pass the bar and breakers without great peril. Everything that could be 



NOETH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 267 

moved was brought away from the steamer, and she blew up soon after she was 
abandoned. 

The year 1862 closed with a disaster, in the loss of the Monitor, the little 
vessel which had rendered such signal service in saving the fleet in Hampton 
Boads from the destructive attack of the Merrimack. She left the Roads on 
the 29th of December, in tow of the steamer Rhode Island, but off Cape Ilatte- 
raa she foundered in a heavy sea, the utmost efforts of her officers and crew 
being insufficient to keep her afloat. Commander Bankhead acted with the 
greatest coolness and gallantry, and succeeded, though with great danger and diffi- 
culty, in transferring most of his crew to the boats of the Rhode Island, with 
the loss, however, of four officers and twelve men. 

The year 1863 was spent by the vessels of the North Atlantic Squadron in 
constant activity, guarding the extended coast, penetrating the rivers and sounds 
of Virginia and North Carolina, repelling attacks upon points already occupied, 
and protecting and helping the army in times of difficulty and embarrassment. 
A number of expeditions have been heretofore described, which will serve as 
examples of many more, carried out with skill and bravery at various times. 

On the 11th of April, Admiral Lee received information that the enemy in 
large force was about to attack the town of Suffi)lk, then held by General 
Peck, and he at once dispatched Lieutenant Lamson, of the Mount Washington, 
with three other small vessels, to occupy the Nansemond between Suffolk and 
the mouth of the Western branch, with instructions to render all the assistance 
in their power to the army, while Lieutenant Gushing, with the Barney, occu- 
pied the lower Nansemond. The stream is a very narrow one, and the vessels 
were constantly exposed to the fire of both artillery and musketry. The occupa- 
tion of the river extended through a considerable period, and was condueted 
with skill and courage. At about the same time the enemy again made a 
demonstration against Washington, N. C., appearing before the intrenchments on 
the 8th of March, and investing the town until April 15th, when he suddenly 
abandoned his works and retired ; the naval forces, under Commander Daven- 
port, being constantly and severely engaged during this time. 

In Virginia, also, the navy continued to co-operate with the land forces in 
various expeditions, intercepting mails, destroying stores, etc., while the vessels 
all along the coast made frequent captures of valuable prizes ; although, notwith- 
standing their vigilance, numerous vessels succeeded in eluding the blockade at 
Wilmington and other points. On the 18th of August the iron propeller Hebe 
attempted to enter Wilmington, but, being headed off, was run ashore and 
abandoned. A boarding party from the Niphon was captured by the enemy, 
who had brought a battery to protect the wreck. They were, however, soon 
driven away, the battery captured and the wreck destroyed. This was but one 
of many instances of the same sort, in which vessels with cargoes of great im- 
portance to the insurgents were captured or destroyed under perilous circum- 
stances. 

In order to secure the most thorough performance of the duties imposed upon 
the blockading squadron, Admiral. Lee, in the summer of the following year, 
(1864,) by direction of the Navy Department, established four divisions of the 
North Atlantic Squadron — one on the James river, one on the sounds of North 
Carolina, and two off Cape Fear river and adjacent inlets, and removed his head- 
quarters from Hampton Roads to Beaufort. 

Major General Butler, on the 5th of May, removed his army from Newport 
News up James river, under convoy of a naval force, and landed on the follow- 
ing night at City Point. Two of the gunboats were destroyed in this move- 
ment, by the explosion of formidable torpedoes which the enemy had planted in 



268 NOKTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

the bed of the river. The enemy had been for two years previous engaged in 
the preparation of a fleet of iron-elads and rams, with which the naval forces 
anticipated an engagement ; but the military commanders, considering that the 
safety of the army transports was of vital importance, and should be placed be- 
yond any contingency, ordered the obstruction of the channel by the sinking of 
vessels. This, although doubtless conducing to the security of the army opera- 
tions, greatly restricted the movements of the fleet, and was not very favorably 
regarded by the naval commanders. A number of short but severe engage- 
ments, however, took place at various times between the gunboats and the many 
powerful batteries with which the enemy had lined the shore of the James, in 
many of which the navy acquired great credit. 

In the sounds of North Carolina important events were in preparation. The 
value of the possession of these waters was evidenced by the frequent and persis- 
tent efforts made by the enemy to repossess himself of them and of the impor- 
tant points upon their shores, held by the army and navy. In the spring of 
1864, the possession of the sounds seemed very insecure ; the land force was 
small and scattered; most of the gunboats were slightly built, the iron-clads 
then at the disposal of government being unsuited for operations in shallow 
waters ; and far up in the almost inaccessible waters of the Roanoke and the 
Neuse, it was known that the construction of armored vessels, as well as of 
others of lighter draught, was in progress. 

On April 17th, the enemy besieged Plymouth, and two days after the ram Al- 
bemarle, a formidable iron-plated battery, descended the Roanoke and attacked 
the wooden gunboats lying off that town. Lieutenant-Commander Flusser, in 
anticipation of tlie attack, had chained together his vessels, the Miami and the 
Southfield, intending to fight the ram in that way, but at three o'clock in the 
morning she made her appearance, and in half an hour had sunk the Southfield, 
disabled the Miami, whose gallant commander was killed, and obtained posses- 
sion of the river. The next day the defences of the town were carried, the 
garrison taken prisoners, and thus the entire command of the upper sound passed 
into the hands of the enemy. 

To prevent further disaster, vigorous measures were at once adopted. Cap- 
tain Melancthon Smith was ordered to assume command in the sounds, with in- 
structions to attack the ram at all hazards, in the best manner to insure its 
destruction. On the 5th of May, the enemy besieged Newborn, and on the 
same day the ram again came out. Captain Smith promptly engaged her, with 
four vessels, the Matabessett, Wyalusing, Sassacus and Whitehead. The en- 
gagement began about half-past four and continued furiously for three hours, 
the gunboats firing rapidly and repeatedly, and ramming the battery, (but this 
unsuccessfully,) with such effect that at dark she retired up the river, and did 
not again make her appearance until the 24th, when she was seen near the 
mouth of the river, but on a shell being thrown from the Whitehead immedi- 
ately returned. 

The next day, a bold attempt was made by five volunteers from the Wyalu- 
sing to destroy the ram by means of a torpedo. The attempt was, however, 
unsuccessful, and the gunboats remained throughout the summer awaiting her 
movements. As no cause could be assigned for her non-appearance, a consider- 
able force was required to be constantly on guard, and this being not only so 
wearisome service, but embarrassing to a great extent the operations of the 
navy, it became important to make a decided attempt for her destruction. For 
this perilous service, Lieut. W. B. Cushing was selected ; a torpedo of extra- 
ordinary power was properly arranged in a light picket boat, and placed at his 
disposal, and on the night of October 27th, accompanied by fourteen brave officers 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 269 

and men who had volunteered for the service, he ascended the Koanoke to Ply- 
mouth, approached the ram under a heavy fire, exploded his torpedo, and sunk 
her. A shot from the ram sunk the torpedo boat just as its work was completed, 
and Lieut. Gushing, with four of his party, escaped, the remainder being killed 
or wounded. This daring achievement removed the main defence of Plymouth, 
and Commander Macomb at once availed himself of the opportunity, and with 
the naval force at his command pressed up to the town, drove the rebels from 
their works, took possession of the place with all its armament, and re-established 
the supremacy of the Government in the waters of North Carolina. 

At two o'clock on the morning of April 9th, 1864, the flag-ship Minnesota, then 
anchored off Newport News, at the mouth of James river, was struck and 
slightly injured by a torpedo boat. Acting Ensign Birtwistle, who was officer of 
the deck at the time, discovered a boat a little forward of the port beam, and 
about one hundred and fifty yards distant. He hailed, and ordered the boat to 
keep off, or he would fire into her. As she continued to approach. Acting Ensign 
Birtwistle hailed the tug Poppy, tender to the flag-ship, and lying astern, and 
ordered her to run the boat down. For some reason, which has never been 
satisfactorily explained, the tug did not obey the order, and before a gun could 
be brought to bear on the torpedo boat, she had struck the flag-ship and 
steamed off, and was soon lost sight of in the darkness. Fortunately the injury 
to the Minnesota was very slight. 

About the middle of April, 1864, an expedition under Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Breck was sent to destroy the extensive salt works belonging to the 
State, situated at Masonboro, N. C. The expedition was entirely successful, 
and returned to the squadron without the loss of a man, after destroying prop- 
erty of immense value to the rebel confederacy. Early in July a joint expedi- 
tion from the army and navy was sent to cut the Wilmington and Weldon Hail- 
road, but the rebels, having obtained information that the expedition was on 
foot, were enabled to defeat its object. 

In July, 1864, Lieutenant-Commander William B. Cushing, accompanied by 
Acting Ensign J. E. Jones, and Acting Master's Mate William Howertt and 
fifteen men, left the squadron for the purpose of making a reconnoissance of 
Wilmington, N. C. ; they approached within two miles of the city, and returned 
to their ships fully informed in regard to the rebel fleet and the fortifications 
of Wilmington. Lieutenant-Commander Cushing displayed his usual gallan- 
try in several trying positions in which he was placed. 

In September, 1864, Acting Kear Admiral Lee was enabled to transmit to the 
Navy Department a package of Wilmington newspapers, in which were editorial 
articles bitterly complaining of the stringency of the blockade. No finer compli- 
ment could have been paid to the ability of Admiral Lee and the efficiency of 
his squadron. 

For a long time, since early in 1862, in fact, the Navy Department had been 
fully aware of the importance of closing the port of Wilmington. It was the last 
port remaining to the rebels, and it was through it that supplies and muni- 
tions were obtained; through it cotton was sent to Europe, and the rebel 
credit abroad chiefly sustained. Owing, however, to the many claims upon 
its attention, the co-operation of the War Department, though often asked for, 
could not be obtained until, in the fall of 1864, Lieutenant-General Grant, 
having given the subject the closest consideration, was of opinion that under 
cover of the guns of the navy a landing might be effected on the beach. A 
part of the naval vessels might, he thought, force a passage beyond the batteries, 
and thus the works on Cape Fear being isolated, a combined attack upon them 
might be followed by their reduction. 



270 NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

This plan of operations the heads of departments adopted, and it became 
necessary to select for the command of the very large fleet which would be 
required; that officer whose past career would -be the best guarantee of future 
services. The choice fell upon Admiral Farragut. But the health of this 
distinguished officer had been so impaired by long and arduous service in the 
gulf, that he was obliged to decline the command, and Eear Admiral David D. 
Porter, who had become well known in connection with the operations of the 
Mississippi Squadron, was selected in his place, and ordered to take command 
of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. This plaoed the port of Wil- 
mington and its defences within the sphere of his operations. Major-General 
Butler was to have command of the land forces. 

The 1st of October was first named for the sailing of the expedition, but so 
many delays occurred, that it was not until the month of December that the 
expedition was in motion. This delay seems to have been unavoidable on the 
part of the army, owing to the many operations in which it was engaged, but 
the naval preparations were complete long before. In the meantime every 
squadron was suffering a depletion to furnish the vessels which lay idle at 
Hampton Koads and Beaufort. At length, however, all was in readiness, and 
on the 16th of December the troops were embarked in transports, only to be 
once more delayed, however, by a severe gale, which lasted three days, and 
caused them severe suffering in their crowded quarters. 

On the 18th, Admiral Porter sailed from Beaufort with all the monitors and 
smaller vessels, and was joined at the rendezvous, twenty miles east of New 
Inlet, on the North Carolina coast, by the larger war vessels and by the trans- 
ports which had there assembled. The next day another heavy gale set in, 
which lasted two days. This somewhat scattered the fleet, but a calm succeeded, 
with weather so favorable, that at length the propitious time seemed to have 
arrived. 

A novel experiment was, however, to be first made : a powder magazine was to 
be exploded, so close to the fort that it was thought by many that the fort 
itself would be leveled to the ground, or that the magazines of the fort would 
be ignited, and that thus the rebels and all their works would be swept from 
the earth. A vessel called the Louisiana, which had been brought from Nor- 
folk, loaded with an immense charge of powder, and carefully fitted with long 
fuses and machinery, was to do this deadly work. On the night of the 
23d, she was towed by another steamer close in shore, so near that the guns 
in the casemates of Fort Fisher could be distinguished from her deck. The 
rebels, mistaking her for a blockade runner, welcomed her with the usual sig- 
nals, and the brave little party having her in charge lighted their fuses and 
fires in the cabins almost in sight of the garrison. They then took to their 
small boat, and escaped to the vessel which had towed the powder boat to the 
shore. An hour after, the explosion followed, but the result was by no means 
what was hoped for. The enemy was somewhat stunned for a time, but little 
real damage was done. 

In the meantime the fleet remained at a distance of twelve miles from the 
bar, and the transports an equal distance down the coast, but with orders to 
stand in shore as soon as the noise of the explosion should be heard. A care- 
fully prepared plan had been distributed to each commander of a vessel and 
early in the morning they were to take their places accordingly, and to open fire 
as each got its assigned position. The whole fleet, consisting of about fifty 
vessels, was formed in three divisions, each with its reserve close at hand, and 
all plaoed upon the radius of a circle about a mile from the fort. At 11.30 the 
New Ironsides took its position and at once opened fire, followed by the Monad- 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 271 

nock, Canonicus and Mahopao. At first the enemy replied briskly, but as the 
larger vessels were followed by the others, each adding to the deadliness of the 
fire, his guns were served with less vigor, and, in an hour and a quarter after 
the first shot was fired, the fort relapsed into silence. The effect within the 
fort of such a concentrated fire must have been fearful. Two of the magazines 
were blown up, and shot and shell so rained upon the garrison that no living 
thing could stand it. The bravest would have been forced to take refuge in the 
bomb-proofs. A moderate fire was continued for three hours after the enemy 
had ceased to reply, but the army transports not having arrived, the fleet retired 
for the night to a safe anchorage. 

During this day's operations, a few of the vessels were struck, and one or two 
were severely injured, but they were of the smaller and less serviceable class. 
Much damage, however, was done by the bursting of large guns in the fleet. 
No less than six of the one-hundred pound Parrots thus exploded, killing and 
wounding a large number of ofiScers and men. The next day was Christmas, 
and all the transports had come in. After consultation with General Weitzel, 
oa the part of General Butler, a plan of operations was decided upon. The 
forts were to be attacked again by the navy, while the army should be landed 
and an assault made. A hundred small boats were to assist in landing the 
troops. At seven o'clock on the 25th, signal was made to get under way, and the 
vessels proceeded to take position as before, which they did promptly and in 
the best order. Again the terrible rain fell around and over the fort, but this 
day little reply was made from the fort. The landing of the troops was 
begun about five miles further up the beach, and was quite unopposed. Three 
thousand men were put ashore, and a reconnoisance made of the neighborhood 
of the works. One soldier even went inside the fort ; an orderly with dispatches 
was captured, and the flag-staff, which had been shot down, was brought away ; 
but the enemy kept himself so close that scarce a human being was to be seen. 

Two light batteries and a few men were captured. But General Butler 
decided that the fort was substantially uninjured as a place of defence; that so 
soon as the fire of the fleet should be withdrawn the enemy would be as strong 
as ever, and that only a regular siege, for which he was not prepared, could 
reduce the works. He therefore decided to withdraw the troops to the trans- 
ports again. This he did, and the next morning the army returned to Fortress 
Monroe. The war vessels in the meantime remained, keeping up a slow but 
constant fire, hoping to tire out the enemy or to dismount their guns. 

On the 29th of December, the Secretary of the Navy again addressed General 
Grant, at the suggestion of the President, asking that a new and more formi- 
dable attempt might be made by the army ; telling him that the fieet could 
maintain itself for the present, prevent the erection of new works, and be ready for 
any service which might be required of them. General Grant decided to send 
immediately a competent force, under command of Major General A. H. Terry. 
He arrived at Beaufort on the 8th of January, and a new plan of operations was 
arranged. Two days of stormy weather succeeded, but on the 13th every pre- 
paration had been made, and the vessels got under way once more, ranged in 
three lines, with the transports in company. 

This time the order of attack was different. The New Ironsides went in first, 
followed by the monitors, all of which got promptly into position, undisturbed 
by the fire from the fort, which opened at 7.30, and at first was quite spirited. 
Before long, however, the guns in the fort began to grow silent, and the vessels 
evidently had the best of it. 

The fire of the fleet was kept up all day, and at intervals through the night 
a few shot and shell were thrown. No sooner had the firing begun in the 



272 NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

morning than the landing of the troops was undertaken, and it had been carried 
on so rapidly, that by 2 P. M. they were all ashore, with twelve days' pro- 
visions. 

The next day was the 15th, and on it the grand attack was to be made by sea 
and land. The troops by this time were rested after their long confinement on 
ship-board, and were eager for the attack. At 9 A. M., the squadron was sig- 
naled to attack in three lines, and at about eleven o'clock they were all in position. 
Each had opened fire as they took position in line, and the bombardment was 
kept up furiously all day. At first the rebels replied with some effect, from the 
same batteries as before, but they were soon driven away into the bomb-proofs. 
Sixteen hundred sailors and four hundred marines had been detailed to assist in 
the assault ; they were to attack the sea face of the fort, while the soldiers 
assaulted from the land side. By three o'clock the troops were all in position, 
and the signal to change the direction of fire was given, when the guns were' 
turned on the upper batteries, away from the point where the assault was to be 
made. 

As soon as the army was found to be in motion, the men from the fleet were 
ordered to advance also. This they did on the run, along the beach. The sailors, 
being armed with cutlasses and pistols, were expected to treat the fort as a ves- 
sel and board it with a dash. They went forward promptly to where the pali- 
sades joined the fort, but the enemy here opened such a heavy fire upon the 
advance that they were here checked, and a number of officers and men fell 
killed and wounded. The first line was thus thrown back, but the second and 
third lines, forming one compact column, advanced rapidly up the sea face of 
Fort Fisher, and nearly gained the parapet, which was lined with one dense 
mass of musketeers, whose fire checked and fiaally brought them to a halt. 
Although rallied several times by the officers, and exhibiting great valor and 
determiaation, they failed to get any further, though a few gained the parapet. 
The men in the rear commenced to retreat, and were soon followed by the rest, 
who got under cover till night. The attack in front, however, had the effect of 
diverting the attention of the enemy, who supposed this to be the main column, 
and the troops, assaulting from behind, thus met with less opposition. The fire 
from the vessels was kept up on those portions of the fort still held by the 
enemy, each traverse, as it was captured, being freed from the shot which fell 
wherever the rebels still held possession. In this remarkable manner the army 
and navy co-operated ; and the result was, that though the fighting lasted till 
long after nightfall, this immense fort, with traverses and bomb-proofs of 
enormous strength, was captured by a handful of men under the fire of the 
guns of the fleet, and in seven hours after the attack was begun. The number 
of guns captured was seventy-five, and of prisoners twenty-five hundred, among 
them Generals Whiting and Lamb, both wounded. 

Rear Admiral Porter, his officers and men, received the thanks of Congress 
for their services in the capture of Fort Fisher. 

Within twenty-four hours after the fall of Fort Fisher, Fort Caswell, Bald- 
head Fort and Fort Shaw were evacuated by the rebels, who, before leaving, 
spiked the guns and demolished the works. Fort Campbell was abandoned a 
few hours later, thus placing in the possession of the United States forces the 
entire chain of rebel defences in the vicinity of Fort Fisher. 

The next important duty devolving upon the officers and men of Admiral 
Porter s squadron was the removal of the torpedoes from Cape Fear river, an 
extremely hazardous undertaking, requiring the greatest caution. About the 
15th of February, the combined forces resumed operations against Wilmington, 
N.L.; moving up the river in concert. Fort Anderson, the most important 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 273 

work remaining in possession of the rebels, surrendered on the 18tli of Febru- 
ary, after a vigorous bombardment of two days from the vessels of the squadron, 
supported by General Sohofield, who advanced upon the fort with 2,000 men. 

On the 21st, the rebels were driven from Fort Strong, which left the way to 
Wilmington unobstructed, and on the 22d of the month that city was evacuated. 

With the fall of Wilmington ended the war record of the North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, which a few months later was disbanded. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

In October, 1861, a joint expedition of military and naval forces was organized 
by the Government. Captain Samuel F. Du Pont, an officer of great professional 
skill and experience, was appointed to its command, the military force being 
under the control of Brigadier- General W. T. Sherman. The intention of the 
Department was to seize and occupy one or more points on the southern coast 
where the blockading squadron might find shelter, possess a depot, and afford 
protection to loyal citizens. To Flag-officer Du Pont was entrusted the impor- 
tant and responsible duty of selecting the point of attack. And he, believing 
that the capabilities of the expedition justified it, determined, after consultation 
with Brigadier General Sherman, to make Port Koyal, S. C, a well defended 
harbor, the objective point. 

On the 29th of October, 1861, the fleet, consisting of forty-eight vessels, in- 
cluding transports, a larger squadron than ever before assembled under the United 
States flag, left Hampton Roads. On Friday, November 1st, the fleet, being then 
off Hatteras, encountered one of the severest storms ever known on the coast. 
The gunboat Isaac Smith was compelled to throw her formidable battery over- 
board, to keep from foundering, and thus relieved was enabled to go to the 
assistance of the chartered steamer Governor, then in a very dangerous condition, 
and on board of which was the battalion of marines under Major Reynolds. 
They were finally rescued by Captain Ringgold, in the Sabine, under difficult 
circumstances, soon after which the Governor went down. The transport Peer- 
less, in a sinking condition, was met by the Mohican, Commander Godon. All 
the men on board the transport, twenty-six in number, were saved by the boats 
of the Mohican under very perilous circumstances. 

On Sunday, November 3d, the weather moderated, and on the following 
morning the fleet arrived at Port Royal, and came to anchor off the bar. All 
aids to the navigation of Port Royal harbor had been removed by the rebels ; 
but, thanks to the skill of Commander Davis, Fleet Captain, and Mr. Boutelle, 
of the Coast Survey, the channel was immediately found, sounded out aid buoyed. 
By 3 P. M., the transports, with all the gunboats, were sent forward, and before 
dark they were securely anchored in the roadstead. 

The gunboats almost immediately opened their batteries on two or three rebef 
steamers under Commodore Tatnall, instantly chasing him under the shelter of 
the batteries. In the morning. Commander John Rodgers, serving temporarily 
on Admiral Du Font's staff, accompanied by Brigadier General Wright in the 
gunboat Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commanding Stevens, and supported by the Seneca, 
liieutenant-Commanding Ammen, and the steamers Curlew and Isaac Smith, 
made a reconnoissance in force, and drew the fire of the batteries on Hilton Head 
and Bay Point, sufficiently to show that the fortifications were works of strength 
and scientifically constructed. 
18 



274 SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

On the morning of Tuesday, the frigate Wabash, the flag-ship, crossed the 
bar, followed closely by the frigate Susquehanna and the Atlanta, Vanderbilt, 
and other transports of deep draught. Preparations for the ensuing battle were 
at once commenced, but the inclemency of the weather made the postponement 
of the attack unavoidable. Thereconnoissance of the 5th of November led Flag- 
officer Du Pont to believe that the forts on Bay Point and Hilton Head were 
armed with more than twenty guns each, of the heaviest calibre and longest 
raufie, and were well constructed and well manned, but that the one on Hilton 
Head was the strongest. The distance between them was two and two-tenths 
nautical miles, too great to admit of their being advantageously engaged at the 
same time, except at long range. He therefore determined to undertake the 
reduction of Fort Walker, on Hilton Head, first, and afterwards to turn his at- 
tention to Fort Beauregard, the fort on Bay Point. The greater part of the 
guns of Fort Walker were presented upon two water fronts, and the flanks were 
but slightly guarded, especially on the North, on which side the approach of an 
enemy had not been looked for. 

A fleet of the enemy, consisting of seven steamers armed with rifle guns, oc- 
cupied the northern portion of the harbor, and stretched along the mouth of 
Beaufort river to Scull creek. 

It was high water on the 7th instant at 11.35 A. M., by the tables of the 
Coast Survey. 

These circumstances, the superiority of Fort Walker and its weakness on the 
northern flank, the presence of the rebel fleet, and the flood tide of the morn- 
ing, decided the plan of attack. 

The order of battle comprised a main squadron ranged in a line ahead, and a 
flanking squadron, which was to be thrown off on the northern section of the 
harbor to engage the enemy's flotilla and to prevent their attacking the rear 
ships of the main line when it turned to the southward" or cutting off a disabled 
vessel. 

The main squadron consisted of the frigate Wabash, Commander C. K. P. 
Eodgers, the leading ship; the frigate Susquehanna, Captain J. L. Lardner ; 
the sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godoa ; the sloop Seminole, Commander 
J. P. Gillis ; the sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant-Commanding R. H. Wyman ; the 
gunboat Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commanding N. Collins; the gunboat Ottawa, 
Lieutenant-Commanding T. H. Stevens ; the gunboat Pembina, Lieutenant-Com- 
manding J. P. Bankhead, and the sailing-sloop Vandalia, Commander F. 8. 
Haggerty, towed by the Isaac Smith, Lieutenant-Commanding J. W. A. Nich- 
olson. 

The flanking squadron consisted of the gunboat Bienville, Commander 
Charles Steedman, the leading ship; the gunboat Seneca, Lieutenant-Command- 
ing Daniel Ammen; the gunboat Curlew, Lieutenant-Commanding P. G. Wat- 
mough ; the gunboat Penguin, Lieutenant^Commanding T. A. Budd ; and the 
gunboat Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott, the closing ship of that line. 
^ The plan of attack was to pass up midway between Ports Walker and Beau- 
regard, receiving and returning the fire of both to a certain distance, about 
two and a-half miles north of the latter. At that point the line was to turn to 
the south, round by the west, and close in with Fort Walker, encountering it 
on its weakest flank, at the same time enfilading in nearly a direct line its two 
water faces. 

When abreast of the fort the engine was to be slowed and the movement 
reduced to a rate of speed that would be but sufficient to overcome the tide, to 
preserve the order of battle by passing the batteries in slow succession, and to 
avoid becoming a fixed mark for the enemy's fire. On reaching the extremity of 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQTJADKON. 275 

Hilton Head the line was to turn to the north by the east, and passing to the 
northward, to engage Fort Walker with the port battery nearer than when first 
oa the same course. These evolutions were to be repeated. 

At 8 A. M., the flag-ship signaled to the squadron to get under way, and 
to take position in the line of battle. At nine o'clock, the signal was made for 
close order. At 9.26, the Wabash poured a broadside into Fort Walker, and 
the action commenced, and after a spirited engagement of three hours' dura- 
tion, fought at a distance of six hundred yards, the order of battle being strictly 
observed, the vessels having passed the batteries three times, the enemy desert- 
ed the works at Hilton Head, and Commander John Rodgers, with a boat's crew 
from the Wabash, landed and hoisted the American flag over the deserted post. 

As soon as this was done, a detachment of gunboats was sent to reconnoitre 
Fort Beauregard and ascertain its condition, when it was discovered that that 
work also had been abandoned. Lieutenant-Commanding Ammen had the honor 
of hoisting the national ensign over the rebel works. 

None of the vessels that participated in the battle of Port Royal received any 
serious injury, while the loss in killed and wounded was but light. Flag-officer 
Du Pont and his command received a letter of commendation from the Navy 
Department, and the thanks of Congress, for their services at Port Royal. 

In the latter part of November, Commander John Rodgers, of the steamer 
Flag, took possession of Tybee Island at the mouth of Savannah river, the fortifi- 
cations having been previously abandoned by the rebels. 

On November 25th, 1861, Commander Drayton, of the Pawnee, left Port Royal 
harbor in command of an expedition up St. Helena sound and adjacent rivers, in 
company with the Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commanding Collins, and the Pembina, 
Lieutenant-Commanding Bankhead. Reconnoissanee was made of St. Helena 
sound and the Coosa and Ashepoo rivers, and the fortifications on Otter Island, 
at the junction of Barnwell Creek with the Coosa, were found to be deserted, 
their magazines blown up and everything valuable carried away or destroyed. 
A reconnoissanee of the North and South Edisto rivers revealed a like abandon- 
ment of their fortified places on the part of the enemy. 

Flag-officer Du Pont, being fearful of losing possession of the bay of St. 
Helena, dispatched a second expedition under Commander Drayton, with orders 
to hold the island until General Sherman was prepared to assume military 
occupation of it. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, with a force of gunboats under 
his command, was ordered to make a reconnoissanee of Warsaw Inlet, in order 
to ascertain the position and force of the enemy's battery there. The recon- 
noissanee was made, and Commander Rodgers reported that the rebels, after 
removing the guns, had abandoned the fortifications at Warsaw Island. In the 
latter part of December, Commander Drayton, with his own vessel, the Pawnee, 
and accompanied by the gunboat Seneca, Lieutenant-Commanding Ammen, 
the Penguin, Lieutenant-Commanding Budd, and the coast survey steamer 
Vixen, Captain Boutelle, made a reconnoissanee of North and South Edisto 
rivers and the adjacent waters. He discovered numerous fortifications which 
had been abandoned by the rebels. A large quantity of cotton was captured 
by the expedition. 

Commander C. R. P. Rodgers was directed to take under his command the gun- 
boats Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commanding Stevens, and Seneca, Lieutenant-Com- 
manding Ammen, and the steamer Henry Andrew, Acting Master Mather, and 
to proceed to Ossibaw, where he was to inform himself as accurately as possible 
of the state of affairs in the inlet and sound, and Vernon and Great Ogeechee 
rivers. He left Tybee Roads on the Ilth of December, and crossed the bar at 
Ossibaw soon after 8 A. M. 



276 SOTITH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

The expedition returned to Port Royal Roads on the following day, and Com- 
mander Kodgers reported that there were no batteries on Ossibaw Island, or in 
the Great Ogeechee, up which river he had ascended as far as Morrell's plantation, 
which he found abandoned. He also reported that there was a fort, advan- 
tageously situated and mounting eight guns, on the eastern end of Green Island ; 
it commanded Vernon river, the Little Ogeechee, Hell-Gate, the passage from 
the Vernon into the Great Ogeechee, and the channel of the latter river. 

On the 28th of December, General Sherman addressed a communication to 
Flag-officer Du Pont/requesting him to furnish a naval force to co-operate with 
the army in arresting the design of the enemy, who had been for some time 
endeavoring to shut up the national forces on Port Royal island, by obstructing 
the Coosa river and Whale branch, by constructing batteries at Port Royal 
Ferry, Seabrook and Boyd's Neck, and also by concentrating a force of three 
thousand troops in the vicinity. 

Commander C. R. P. Rodgers was appointed to the command of the naval 
forces, which consisted of the gunboats Ottawa, Seneca, Pembina, Ellen, and 
C.B.Hale. The part assigned to the gunboats was to protect the landing of 
the troops at Heywood's plantation, the first point of debarkation ; to cover the 
route of the advancing column and the second point of debarkation, and to 
assail the batteries on the front. The attack was made on the first day of January, 
1862, and the movement was entirely successful. 

The aid rendered the army was of such a character as to elicit from Brigadier 
General Sherman, who commanded the military forces, the most cordial thanks. 

Flag-officer DuPont, having in contemplation an attack on Fernandina, deemed 
it advisable to direct the enemy's attention from that point, by sending an expe- 
dition of gunboats to make a reconnoissance of the Little Tybee river and the 
adjacent streams, which would serve as a demonstration upon Savannah. The 
expedition was commanded by Fleet Captain Charles H. Davis, and consisted 
of the Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commanding Stevens j Seneca, Lieutenant-Command- 
ing Ammen ; Isaac Smith, Lieutenant-Commanding Nicholson ; Potomska, 
Lieutenant-Commanding Watmough; Ellen, Lieutenant-Commanding Budd; 
Western World, Acting Master Gregory, and two armed launches of the 
Wabash ; having in company three transport steamers, on board of which were 
the _6th Connecticut, the 4th New Hampshire and the 97th Pennsylvania 
Regiments, in all twenty-four hundred men, commanded by Brigadier-General 
H. G. Wright. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers accompanied the expedition. 

The expedition left Port Royal on the 1st of February, and anchored in 
Warsaw Sound the same evening. On the 2d they entered the Little Tybee 
river, and passed Fort Pulaski without being fired on. After passing the high- 
land on Wilmington Island, the further progress of the gunboats was arrested 
by a blockade of heavy piles across the channel. The vessels were anchored, 
and boats were dispatched from them to examine the numerous creeks leading 
into the river. 

Captain Rodgers landed with the armed launches and a detachment of troops, 
to scout and determine whether there were then or had been any batteries in 
position in the vicinity; none were found ; Captain Ammen landed, passed the 
marsh, and cut the telegraph wire leading from Fort Pulaski to the city. 

About noon, five steamers, composing the rebel fleet, commanded by Commo- 
dore Tatnall, attempted to pass down the river with scows in tow. They were 
immediately fired upon by Fleet Captain Davis, and Commodore Tatnall returned 
the fire. The engagement lasted less than half an hour. Commodore Tatnall, 
with one of his squadron, was driven back; the rest escaped apparently without 
injury, and succeeded in reaching Fort Pulaski. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 277 

In the afternoon, ttey returned up the river from the fort, and the firing was 
resumed. They had waited for low water, and were so well protected by the 
banks of the river, while Flag-officer Davis's gunboats were lying in a natural., 
trench or moat, that the harm inflicted upon them was entirely disproportionate 
to the amount of ammunition expended. 

As a demonstration, the appearance of the naval and military force in Wil- 
mington and Warsaw Sounds was a complete success. Savannah was thrown 
into a state of great alarm, and the energies of the place exerted to increase its 
military defences, for which purpose troops were withdrawn from other points. 
As a reconnoissance the results were equally satisfactory. Much valuable 
information was obtained, and used with advantage by Flag-officer Du Pont in 
his subsequent operations. 

On the last day of February, 1862, Flag-officer Du Pont left Port Royal in 
the Wabash, and on the 2d of March transferred his flag to the sloop-of-war 
Mohican, and entered Cumberland sound in that vessel, accompanied by the 
following vessels, sailing in the order named : Ottawa, Mohican, Ellen, Seminole, 
Pawnee, Pocahontas, Flag, Florida, James Adger, Bienville, Alabama, Key- 
stone State, Seneca, Huron, Pembina, Isaac Smith, Penguin, Potomska, armed 
cutter Henrietta, armed transport McClellan, (the latter having on board a bat- 
talion of marines under command of Major Reynolds,) and the transports Em- 
pire City, Marion, Star of the South, Belvidere, Boston and Georgia, contain- 
ing a brigade under the command of Brigadier-Greneral Wright. 

The main object of the expedition was the repossession of Fort Clinch and the 
capture of Fernandina. The rebels abandoned their works without a struggle, 
and Lieutenant White, of the Ottawa, hoisted the national flag on Fort Clinch, 
the first of the national forts on which the ensign of the Union had resumed its 
proper place since the first proclamation of President Lincoln was issued. 

Commander Percival Drayton, in the gunboat Ottawa, Lieutenant-Command- 
ing Stevens, proceeded to Fernandina, and took possession of that place. Com- 
mander C. R. P. Rodgers, with a second division, was sent to occupy St. Marys. 
Lieutenant-Commanding T. H. Stevens, in the Ottawa, pushed on from this place, 
and, encountering the rebel riflemen and cavalry on the banks, dispersed them 
by a few shots from his 11-inch Dahlgren gun. 

On the 7th of March, Commander S. W. Godon was dispatched with a divi- 
sion of gunboats, consisting of the Mohican, Pocahontas, and the Potomska, to 
hold Brunswick ; and on the same day another division of the squadron was 
sent to Jacksonville, both places surrendering without opposition. 

On the 12th of March, Commander 0. R. P. Rodgers received the surrender 
of St. Augustine, the citizens raising the United States flag. This expedition 
gave to Flag-officer Du Pont possession of Fort Clinch, Fernandina, St. Marys, 
Cumberland island and sound, Amelia sound, Jacksonville, St. Augustine and 
Brunswick — in fact, the coast and inland waters from St. Simon's southward. 

Soon after Flag-officer Du Font's return to Port Royal, Robert Small, a col- 
ored pilot, escaped from Charleston, under circumstances of peculiar daring. 
From him was received information which led to the occupation of Stono inlet 
and river, thus securing an important base for future military operations. 

Under date of the 24th of March, 1862, Flag-officer Du Pont reported to the 
Navy Department the death of Lieutenant-Commanding Budd, Acting-Master 
Mather and others, who had been killed by the enemy while on a boat expe- 
dition in Mosquito lagoon. Flag-officer Du Pont closes his official report with 
the following tribute .to their worth ; 

" Lieutenant-Commanding Budd and Acting-Master Mather were brave and 
devoted officers. The former commanded the Penguin in the action of the 7th 



278 SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

of November, and received my commendation. The latter, in the prime of life, 
was a man of uncommon energy and daring, and had no superior, probably, 
among the patriotic men who have been appointed in the navy from the mer- 
cantile marine." 

Fort Pulaski, after a bombardment of two days, surrendered to the military 
forces on the 12th of April. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, with a detachment 
of officers and men from the Wabash, had the good fortune to represent the 
navy on this occasion, they being in charge of Battery Sigel. 

Feeling the impossibility of effectually blockading the port of Charleston, the 
Navy Department, in 1862, commenced active preparations to send a force of 
iron-clads to the South Atlantic Squadron, for the purpose of demolishing the 
defences of Charleston harbor, and, if possible, capturing the city itself. As 
soon as the iron-clads were turned over to the department by the contractors, 
they were placed in commission and sent to report to Rear Admiral Du Pont. 

On the 26th of January, 1863, Commander Worden, of the iron-clad Blon- 
tauk, opened fire upon the enemy's battery at Genesis Point, Great Ogeechee river. 
After a bombardment of four hours, during which the enemy's fort was seri- 
ously damaged, the Montauk was compelled to haul off, her ammunition being 
expended. 

At 4 A. M., January 31st, 1863, during the obscurity of a thick haze, the 
rebel rams Chicora and Palmetto came out of Charleston by the main ship 
channel, unperceived by the squadron, and made a raid on the blockading fleet. 
The Mercedita was the first vessel attacked, a heavy shell from the enemy 
entering the starboard side, passing through the condenser, the steam drum of 
the port boiler, and exploding against the port side, blowing a hole, in its exit, 
some four or five feet square, killing the gunner, and by the escape of steam 
scalding a pumber of men, and rendering her motive power useless. 

The iron-clad, leaving the Mercedita to her fate to sink or not, next engaged 
the Keystone State, Commander Le Roy, who was also attacked by the other 
ram. Their fire was gallantly returned ; but a shell exploding on the forehold of 
this vessel, she was set on fire. 

Commander Le Roy kept off until the fire was got under, when he steered 
again for one of the iron-clads, and ordered full steam, determined to try to run 
her down. The guns had been trained and depressed for a plunging fire at the 
moment of collision, and the ship had acquired a speed of twelve knots, when a 
shell or shot from the enemy passed through both steam chests, wholly disabling 
her boilers and rendering her powerless. 

Ten rifled shells struck the Keystone State ; two burst on the quarter-deck, 
but most of them struck near and below the water line. In the meantime, the 
Augusta, Commander Parrot; the Quaker City, Commander Frailey, and the 
Memphis, Acting Lieutenant Watmough, kept up a fire upon the enemy, divert- 
ing their attention from the Keystone State, which was soon after taken in tow 
by the Memphis and drawn out of range. The Augusta and Quaker City were 
both struck in their hulls; the Memphis only in her rigging. The Housatonic, 
Captain Taylor, gave chase, and a shot from her struck the pilot-house of one of 
the iron-clads, doing some damage and carrying away one of her flags. The rebel 
vessels then passed to the northward, and took refuge in the swash-channel, 
behind the shoals. The only casualties were on the Mercedita and Keystone 
State. On the Keystone State they were very large; about one- fourth of her 
crew were killed and wounded, and among the former, the medical officer of the 
ship. Assistant Surgeon Jacob H. Gotwald, who was scalded to death while 
rendering surgical aid to one of the wounded men. Nine of those who 
died perished from the escape of steam when the boilers and steam-chimneys 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADEON. 279 

were penetrated; and among the wounded, the greater number received their 
injuries from the same cause. 

On the return of the rams to Charleston, General Beauregard issued a procla- 
mation that the blockade of the port had been raised by force of arms. This 
statement was promptly refuted by Kear Admiral Du Pont, who forwarded to 
the Navy Department a paper signed by all the commanding officers on the 
blockade, showing that, with the exception of the time occupied in engaging 
the rams, the blockading vessels had not, for one moment, left their regular sta- 
tions. 

On the 30th of January, the steamer Isaac Smith was fired upon, and 
grounded under the guns of a rebel battery in Stono river, and, after a gallant 
resistance, was compelled to surrender. The vessel was destroyed, and her offi- 
cers and crew taken prisoners. 

A second attack was made by Commander Worden, of the Montauk, on the 
rebel battery situated on the Ogeechee river, on February 1st, 18G3. After a 
bombardment of six hours, finding it useless to continue the fire, he withdrew 
out of range, the Montauk being struck forty-six times without material damage. 

On the evening of the 27th of February, Commander Worden observed the 
enemy's armed steamer Nashville in motion above the battery known as Fort 
McAllister. A reconnoissance immediately made proved that in moving up the 
river she had grounded. At daylight the next morning, Commander Worden, 
in the Montauk, and accompanied by the gunboats Seneca, Wissahickon and 
Dawn, moved up under a heavy fire from the battery, and opened their guns on 
the Nashville, the Montauk engaging at twelve hundred yards and the wooden 
gunboats at long range. 

At 9.55 A. M., the magazine of the Nashville was exploded by a well-directed 
shot from the Montauk, and Commander Worden, after assuring himself of the 
complete destruction of the rebel vessel, dropped down beyond the range of the 
enemy's guns. In so doing, a torpedo exploded under his vessel; inflicting, 
however, but little injury. 

The Nashville had been blockaded in the Ogeechee river for over eight 
months, and the enemy had constructed a line of torpedoes across the river, to 
prevent its ascent by light draught vessels to cut her out. The gallantry and 
energy of Commander Worden released from blockading duty at least two 
vessels, that would otherwise have been kept in the Ogeechee river for months 
to come. 

Wishing to fully test the powers of the monitors and iron-clads before engag- 
ing in an attack on the defences in Charleston harbor. Hear Admiral Du Pont 
sent the monitors Passaic, Captain Drayton; Patapsco, Commander Ammen, 
and Nahant, Commander Downs, to engage Fort McAllister, on the Ogeechee 
river. 

After a bombardment of eight hours. Captain Drayton, finding that he had 
made but little impression on the fort, withdrew his vessels from action. 

On the morning of the 6th of April, Kear Admiral Du Pont, in the flag-ship 
New Ironsides, accompanied by the monitors Passaic, Captain Drayton ; Weehaw- 
ken. Captain John Rodgers; Montauk, Captain J. L. Worden; Patapsco, Com- 
mander Ammen ; Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers ; Nantucket, Com- 
mander Fairfax; Nahant, Commander Downs, and Keokuk, Commander Rhiud, 
crossed the bar, intending to proceed the same day to the attack on Fort Sumpter, 
but after reaching an anchorage inside, the weather became so hazy that the 
pilots declined to go further. 

On the following day, April 7th, at noon, being the earliest hour at which, 
owing to the state of the tide, the pilots would consent to move, the vessels 



280 SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

weighed ancior and took their designated positions, their commanders having 
previously received orders n,ot to reply to the batteries on Morris Island, but 
reserve their fire until they could pass Fort Sumpter, in case there were no 
obstructions, and to attack the north-west face, liie heavy fire received from 
Forts Sumpter and Moultrie, and the other rebel batteries, together with the 
nature of the obstructions, compelled the attack from the outside. 

The flag-ship New Ironsides could not be brought into such close action as 
the Admiral desired, as, owing to the narrow channel and rapid current, she 
became partly unmanageable, and was twice forced to anchor to prevent going 
ashore. She could not get nearer than one thousand yards. The monitors 
were enabled to get within easy range of Fort Sumpter, at distances varying 
from five hundred to eight hundred yards, in which positions they were sub- 
jected successively to a tremendous concentrated fire from all the batteries on 
fciullivan's Island, Morris Island, Sumpter and others of the most formidable 
kind, and from guns of the heaviest calibre. 

At 4.30 P. M., Bear Admiral Du Pont made signal to withdraw from action, 
intending to resume the attack the next morning. But when the comnianding 
officers of the iron-elads reported the severe injury their vessels had sustained, 
the Commander-in-Chief became convinced of the utter impracticability of taking 
the city of Charleston, with the force under his command, and so reported to 
the Department. 

The ships had been exposed to the severest fire of the enemy over forty minutes, 
and yet, in that brief period, five of the iron-clads wore wholly or partially dis- 
abled in that which was most essential to their success, their batteries. Com- 
mander' Bhind, in the Keokuk, had only been able to fire^ three times during the 
short period he was exposed to the guns of the enemy, and was obliged to with- 
draw from action to prevent his vessel sinking, which event occurred on the 
following morning. 

Bear Admiral Du Pont returned his thanks to the commanding officers of the 
vessels engaged in the attack, and to his Fleet Captain, Commander C. R. P. 
Bodgers, whom he complimented in words of high praise for his efficient, gallant 
and valuable services, from the capture of Port Boyal to the attack on the 
defences of Charleston. 

Bear Admiral Du Pont, having received information that the Atlanta and 
other iron-clads, at Savannah, were about attempting to enter Warsaw sound 
by Wilmington fiver, for the purpose of attacking the blockading vessels there 
and in the sounds further south, dispatched the Weehawken, Captain John 
Bodgers, and the Nahant, Commander John Downs, to Warsaw. At 4.10 A. M., 
on the 17th of June, the iron-clad Atlanta was discovered coming down the 
Wilmington river, accompanied by two other steamers, one a side-wheel, and the 
other a propeller. Captain Bodgers shipped the cable and prepared his vessel 
for action. At 5.15 A. M., being distant from the enemy three hundred yards, 
he commenced firing. At 5.30 A. M., the enemy hauled down his colors and 
hoisted the white flag, and was taken possession of by a boat from the 
Nahant. 

But five shots were fired by the Weehawken, and the action was of such brief 
duration that the Nahant did not have an opportunity to become engaged. The 
rebels were so confident of a speedy and decisive victory, that the steamers 
which accompanied the Atlanta were filled with gay parties from Savannah, to 
witness the triumph of their favorite vessel. 

Captain Bodgers received a complimentary letter from the Navy Department, 
thanking him not only for his services in the capture of the Atlanta, but 
throughout the rebellion. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADEON. 281 

The Navy Department also addressed the following letter to Kear Admiral 
Du Pont, who was about to relinquish the command of the South Atlantic Block- 
ading Squadron : 

Navy Department, June 26th, 1863. 

Sir : — The Department has received your several dispatches announcing the 
capture of the rebel iron-clad steamer Fingal, alias Atlanta, and inclosing the 
detailed reports of Captain John Rodgers and Commander John Downs of the 
affair. I take occasion to express the Department's appreciation of your prompt 
measures to prepare for the expected appearance of the rebel iron-clads, by send- 
ing off Savannah two of your own, ably commanded, and congratulate you on 
the acquisition of so powerful a vessel, which promises to be of important ser- 
vice on the station. 

To your ceaseless vigilance, and that of the oflScers under your command, 
were we indebted, some months since, for the destruction of the steamer Nash- 
ville, which the enemy had armed and fruitlessly endeavored to send out to 
destroy our commerce ; and now to your timely measures, and the efficient means 
provided, do we owe the capture of one of the most powerful iron-clads afloat — 
a vessel prepared after months of toil and great expenditure of money, and sent 
forth with confidence to disperse our blockading fleet and overcome our moni- 
tors. You may well regard this, and we may with pleasure look upon it, as a 
brilliant termination of a command gallantly commenced, and conducted for 
nearly two years with industry, energy and ability. 

The Department desires you to recommend an officer of the South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron to command the Atlanta. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

S. F. Du Pont, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 

Rear Admiral Du Pont having signified his wish to be relieved, Rear Ad- 
miral Andrew H. Foote was detailed to command the South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron. Rear Admiral Foote, while on the way to his command, was seized 
■with fatal illness and died in New York city. His associate and second in com- 
mand. Rear Admiral Dahlgren, proceeded immediately to Port Royal, and on the 
6th day of July assumed command of the squadron. 

Rear Admiral Dahlgren at once commenced active co-operation with Major 
General Gilmore, commanding military forces, in effecting the occupation and 
possession of Morris Island, on the south side of the entrance to Charleston 
harbor. 

On the 18th of July, 1863, a combined attack was made on Fort Wagner, 
by the troops under General Gilmore, and the iron-clads of the squadron. 
Admiral Dahlgren led the attack in the Montauk, followed by the Ironsides, 
Catskill, Nantucket, Weehawken and Patapsco. The fort was engaged at three 
hundred yards' range, and silenced for the day, so that not a shot was fired 
afterwards at the vessels, nor was there a man seen about it. The assaulting 
party of troops were repulsed with some loss, and Rear Admiral Dahlgren, in his 
official report, attributes the failure of the attack to the inadequacy of the force. 

On the 17th of August, General Gilmore opened all his batteries on Fort 
Sumpter, firing on Port Wagner and the intermediate space. Admiral Dahlgren 
at the same time moved up with the entire available naval force, leading in the 
Weehawken, followed by the Catskill, Nahant and Montauk ; the Passaic and 
Patapsco in reserve for Sumpter, the Ironsides in position opposite to Wagner, 



282 SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

and a number of gunboats engaged at long range. As the tide rose the Wee- 
hawken ran close in to about four hundred and fifty yards of Wagner, the other 
three monitors followed, and the Ironsides as near as her great draught of 
water permitted. After a steady and well-directed fire, Wagner was silenced 
about 9.20 A. M., and that of the vessels was slackened in consequence. 
Meanwhile the fire of their batteries was working effectually upon the gorge of 
Sumpter, which appeared to have been strengthened in every possible manner. 
At this time the Admiral's flag was shifted to the Passaic, which, with the 
Patapsco, both having rifled guns, steamed up the channel within two thousand 
yards of Sumpter, when fire was opened on the gorge, angle, and south east end 
of the work. Sumpter scarcely replied, Wagner was silenced, and battery Gregg 
alone maintained a deliberate fire at the Passaic and Patapsco. At noon the 
vessels were withdrawn from action to give their crews a rest, they having been 
working since daylight. 

During the afternoon, the shore batteries continued the fire at Sumpter with 
little or no reply from the enemy, and the Passaic and Patapsco were sent up 
to prevent Wagner from repairing damages. The fort replied briskly, but in a 
brief time left off firing. 

During this action, Captain George W. Eodgers, Chief of Staff, was killed 
while in command of the monitor Catskill, as was also Paymaster Woodbury, 
who was standing near him. Admiral Dahlgren, in his report, pays a sincere 
and beautiful tribute to the memory of the gallant Eodgers. 

After several other engagements between the monitors (which were in each 
instance led by Admiral Dahlgren in person) and the rebel works, Morris Island, 
with all its batteries, was captured by the combined forces of the army and navy. 
With the capture of Morris Island the commerce of Charleston ceased, blockade 
running coming to an abrupt termination. 

Rear Admiral Dahlgren received the thanks of the Navy Department for his 
untiring energy and personal gallantry, as exhibited in his operations in Charles- 
ton harbor. 

In February, 1864, a division of gunboats was sent to the St. Johns river 
to co-operate with the army in a movement into Florida. Rear Admiral Dahl- 
gren accompanied the expedition, and assigned an adequate naval force, which 
held possession of all points on the St. Johns occupied by the army. 

On the night of February 17th, the sloop-of-war Housatonic, one of the 
blockading fleet, was sunk by a torpedo boat off Charleston. Most of the crew 
were saved. 

The rebels made attacks with torpedoes upon several vessels, including the 
flag-ship of the blockading squadron, but were unsuccessful, except in the case of 
the Housatonic. 

In February, Rear Admiral Dahlgren received leave of absence, transferring 
the command of the squadron to Commodore S. C. Rowan. In March, a diver- 
sion was made at Bull's Bay. In May, a force was detailed to co-operate in an 
effort to sever the railroad between Charleston and Savannah. 

Rear Admiral Dahlgren returned to the squadron in May, and found that 
General Gilmore had been called with the greater part of his army to another 
field, leaving behind, however, a sufficient defensive force when sustained by the 
navy. The withdrawal of so large a portion of the military force necessarily 
put a stop to further serious demonstrations against Charleston. 

The retention of the harbor, as well as the safety of that coast, depended 
thenceforward maiply on the ifon-clads. 

In November, 1864, the Navy Department received official information that 
Major- General Sherman had commenced his march from Atlanta to the sea- 



SOXITH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 283 

board, and that lie might be expected to reach the Atlantic coast, in the vicinity 
of Savannah, about the middle of December. Kear Admiral Dahlgren was ad- 
vised of this fact, and was instructed to be in readiness to co-operate with 
General Sherman, and furnish him such assistance as he might desire. 

Before these instructions reached Kear Admiral Dahlgren, he had conferred 
with Major-General Foster, then commanding the division of the South, and con- 
certed with him plans to assist, so far as their joint forces would allow, in estab- 
lishing communication with the advancing army. A combined expedition was 
at once organized for cutting the railroad between Charleston and Savannah, 
and otherwise engaging the attention of the enemy in that quarter. Force was 
displayed at the most important points along the Carolina coast, and every avail- 
able means adopted to aid in the success of the grand military movement which 
was in progress through the heart of the enemy's country. General Sherman 
reached the vicinity of Savannah on the 12th of December, and communication 
between him and Kear Admiral Dahlgren was immediately established. The 
latter made the best disposition of the vessels under his command to assist the 
army in taking possession of Savannah. 

On the 18th of December, the investment of that city, by the army on one 
side and the navy on the other, was accomplished. 

The garrisons succeeded in escaping across the river, and in effecting a retreat 
towards Charleston, leaving General Sherman to occupy Savannah on the 21st 
of the month. 

Early in January, Kear Admiral Dahlgren was engaged in assisting in the 
transfer of the right wing of the army to Beaufort, S. C, and in the course of 
General Sherman's march northward, that officer and his army were aided by 
all needful demonstrations. 

On the 12th and 13th of February, a joint movement was made along the 
approaches from Bull's Bay to Mount Pleasant, with a view of embarrassing the 
military Commandant at Charleston, and blinding him as to the actual military 
design. No real or serious attack on Charleston was contemplated. Other less 
extensive movements were made at other points to attract the attention of the 
rebels and aid General Sherman in accomplishing his great purpose of moving 
towards Kichmond. 

Charleston was in the meantime vigilantly watched, to detect the first indica- 
tion of abandonment by the rebels, which it was known must take place at an 
early day. The troops stationed thereabouts were advanced and the iron-clads 
moved nearer to the works. 

Daring the night of the 17th of February, the batteries were ceaselessly 
employed, and the vessels in the harbor gave them watchful attention. 

'The morning of the 18th revealed the fact that Charleston was evacuated. 

During the night of the evacuation the monitors kept up a sharp and con- 
tinuous bombardment on the rebel batteries, the enemy replying from Moultrie 
with a few guns, but ceasing as the night wore on. Subsequent events developed 
the fact that the main body had left the island at 8 o'clock, except a party of 
one hundred and fifty men, who remained behind to keep up the firing and thus 
delay the knowledge of the evacuation. Kear Admiral Dahlgren at onOe 
pushed up the harbor, passing between Sumpter and Moultrie to the city 
batteries on Cooper river, under the guidance of a mate captured from a blockade 
runner a few nights previous. 

The flag-ship was anchored off the city, and Admiral Dahlgren, accompanied 
by several officers of his fleet, landed and walked along some of the principal 
streets. There was nothing to indicate the ravages of war, save here and there, 
where a rifle shot from distant batteries had scarred some dwellings. 



284 EASTERN GULF SQUADRON. 

The evacuation of Charleston was followed by that of Georgetown on the 23d 
of February, and on the 26th of the same month, the place itself was occupied 
by Rear Admiral Dahlgren. 



EASTERN GULF BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron embraced within its limits -the coast 
of Florida from Cape Florida to Pensacola. The division of the Gulf Squadron 
did not take place until 1862. Previous to that time the blockade of the entire 
coast from Cape Florida to the Rio Grande river, was under the command of 
Captain William Mervine, who was relieved in September, 1861, by Captain 
William W. McKean. 

In January, 1862, Flag-officer McKean dispatched Commander Emmons, with 
the steamer Hatteras, to operate against the rebels at Cedar Keys. The expedi- 
tion was entirely successful, destroying a large amount of public property, 
including military stores, and capturing a battery of two guns in position at 
Sea Horse Key, and several schooners laden and ready to run the blockade.. In 
the latter part of March, Commander Stellwagen, of the Mercedita, arrived off 
Appalachicola, with that vessel and the Sagamore, Lieutenant-Commanding 
Drake, and organized a boat expedition, the immediate object of which was the 
capture of a number of vessels, understood to be at or above that city. The 
place had been evacuated by the soldiers, some six hundred in number, on the 
first appearance of the naval force. No resistance was offered, and the expedi- 
tion brought out several vessels and destroyed others, owing to the difficulty 
of getting them over the bar. 

Information having been received that the rebel steamer Florida, which had 
succeeded in getting into St. Andrews, was lying some twenty miles above that 
town, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant David Cate, commanding tbe U. S. bark 
Pursuit, determined to make an attempt to cut her out. A volunteer expedi- 
tion was organized and left the vessel on the 4th of April, and on the night of 
the 6th reached and surprised the Florida. The crew were captured with slight 
resistance, and the vessel, a valuable side-wheel steamer of 500 tons, with a cargo 
of 200 bales of cotton, was brought out safely. 

_ About this time, April, 1862, the Gulf Squadron was divided into two sec- 
tions; the Western division taking in that portion of the coast which lay 
between Pensacola on the one hand and the Rio Grande on the other; including 
the navigable streams entering into the Gulf; Flag-officer Farragut taking com- 
mand of the Western Gulf, and Captain James L. Lardner the Eastern Gulf, 
relieving Flag-officer McKean. 

Flag-officer Lardner continued in the command of the squadron until the fall, 
when he was relieved by Acting Rear Admiral Theodorus Bailey. During the 
year 1863 many important boat expeditions for cutting out vessels and destroy- 
ing salt-works were projected and executed with success. More than one hun- 
dred blockade-runners were captured or destroyed by the squadron during the 
year, and violating the blockade became so precarious a business that few were 
desperate enough to attempt it. In the latter part of the year the limits of the 
Eastern Gulf Squadron were extended so as to embrace within its cruising 
grounds the waters of the Bahamas in the vicinity of Cuba. 

In May, an expedition was planned by the rebels for capturing or destroying 
the United States steamer Adela, then blockading off Appalachicola. The 
organization consisted of several hundred men, led by rebel naval officers. Infor- 



WEST GTJLF SQUADRON. 285 

mation of the proposed movement was received in time to defeat their object, 
and a joint military and naval force was dispatched against the party, and suc- 
ceeded in capturing most of them, with several boats, their ammunition, flags 
and accoutrements. 

On the 7th of August, 1864, Acting Rear Admiral Bailey, whose health was 
■ suffering from the debilitating influence of the climate, turned over the com- 
mand of the squadron, by permission of the department, to Captain Theodore 
P. Greene, the officer next in rank, and came north. Captain Greene continued 
in command until the 12th of October, when he was relieved by Acting Rear 
Admiral C. K. Stribling. During the year many armed incursions were made 
into the interior of Florida, destroying a number of salt works, and in this 
way inflicting serious injury upon the enemy. 

Several successful expeditions against the enemy were dispatched by Acting 
Rear Admiral Stribling, in the early part of the year 1865. In July, 1865, 
Acting Rear Admiral Stribling hauled down his flag as Commander-in-Chief of 
the Eastern Gulf Blockading Squadron, which had been merged into the Gulf 
Squadron. 

Rear Admiral Stribling received from the Department a letter, expressing its 
appreciation of his services while in command of the East Gulf Squadron. 



WEST GULF BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

On the night of the 12th of April, 1861, Captain H. A. Adams, of the frigate 
Sabine, and senior officer on the Pensaoola blockade, in pursuance of orders he 
had previously received, landed a party of United States troops, under Captain 
Vogdes, and the marines of the squadron, under Lieutenant Cash, for the pur- 
pose of reinforcing Fort Pickens. The expedition was under the charge of Com- 
mander Charles H. Poor, assisted by Lieutenant Smith, of the Brooklyn, Lieu- 
tenant Newman, of the Sabine, and Lieutenant Belknap, of the St. Louis. The 
service was performed without accident or disorder. The Brooklyn, Captain 
Walker, and the Wyandotte, Lieutenant-Commanding Mullany, carried the 
landing party to the designated spot with accuracy, notwithstanding the darkness 
of the night.. 

On August 3d, 1861, one of the tenders of the U. S. steamer South Carolina, 
then blockading off Galveston, while returning from a cruise to the southward, 
was fired upon from two rebel batteries. The fire was returned in the most 
gallant manner ; and after exchanging a few passing shots, the tender reported 
the fact to Captain Alden, of the South Carolina, which vessel was lying only 
three miles off. Captain Alden, knowing the defenceless condition of the 
town, believed the whole affair was the result of misunderstanding or accident. 
He therefore waited all day for some explanation on the part of the authorities, 
but none came. 

On the contrary, steam was gotten up on the General Rusk, a large ocean 
steamer, which had been for some time preparing for sea; and other demonstrations 
satisfied Captain Alden that, so far from their volunteering explanations, they 
were ready, and indeed wanted a brush. He therefore, about 4 P. M., got 
under way and stood down towards the batteries. This movement of the 
South Carolina was the signal for the General Rusk to get under way, but the 
South Carolina turning to give chase, she steamed back with all speed. A few 
minutes later the Rusk attempted, the second time to run out, but this being 
unsuccessful, she was content to return and watch the result out of harm's way. 



286 WEST GULP SQUADRON. 

The South Carolina now resumed her original course and stood direct for the 
batteries, and was no sooner in range than they opened their fire upon her. 
After exchanging some dozen or fifteen shots with them, Captain Alden with- 
drew, satisfied that he was doing more injury to the city, or perhaps to unoffending 
citizens, than to the batteries, or those who sought the collision. The firing of 
the enemy was so extremely bad, that not a shot touched the South Carolina. 
On the 5th of August, the Consuls of Foreign Powers saw fit to send a docu- 
ment to Captain Alden, protesting against what they termed the bombardment 
of Galveston without due notice to the non-combatanta. 

Captain Alden, in reply, recited the facts given above, which he deemed a suf- 
ficient answer, and in concluding very pertinently said : " I must respectfully 
remark, that it is the first time that I ever heard that the women and children, 
or unarmed citizens of one of our towns, were under the protection of foreign 
consuls." 

On the night of September 13th, 1861, an expedition was fitted out from 
the frigate Colorado, flag-ship, consisting of the first launch and first, second and 
third cutters, under the command of Lieutenants Russell, Sprotson and Blake, 
and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds of the 
Marine corps, Assistant Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant Engineer White, and 
Midshipmen Forrest and Higginson. The whole force detailed was about one 
hundred officers, sailors and marines. The object of the expedition was the 
destruction of a schooner which lay ofl' the Pensacola Navy Yard, supposed to 
be fitting out as a privateer, and the spiking of a gua in battery in the south- 
east end of the yard. 

The- attack was made on the morning of the 14th, at half-past three o'clock. 
The schooner was moored to the wharf, armed with a pivot and two broad- 
side guns, under the protection of a battery and field piece. The crew were 
prepared to receive their assailants, pouring in a volley of musketry as the 
boats neared the vessel. After a desperate resistance, they were driven from 
the deck of the schooner on to the wharf, where they rallied and were joined by 
the guard, a continual fire upon the attacking party being kept up. In the 
meantime the vessel was set on fire in several places, and while burning was 
freed from her moorings, and drifted down opposite Fort Barrancas, where she 
sank. 

Of the party assigned to attend to the spiking of the gun, only Lieutenant 
Sprotson and Gunner Boreton were able to find it, the party becoming separated 
in the darkness. Fortunately only one man was found in charge of the gun, 
and he immediately leveled his piece at Lieutenant Sprotson, but was shot 
down by Gunner Boreton before he could obtain correct aim, both pieces 
exploding simultaneously. The gun, a X-inch columbiad, was immediately 
spiked, and the officers returned to their boat. 

The object of the expedition was accomplished in the short space of fifteen 
minutes, and the whole force of the enemy being aroused, the assailants pulled 
away, and when a short distance from the shore fired six charges of cannister 
from their howitzers into the yard. 

This brilliant affair was not unattended with loss of life. Boatswain's Mate 
Charles H. Lamphere, and John R. Hemig, seaman and captain of howitzer, 
were killed by shots from the cross-trees of the schooner ; and Marine John 
Smith, the first man to board the schooner, and who behaved most gallantly, 
having lost his distinguishing mark, was killed by one of the attacking party. 
Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and Midshipman 
Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake 
were each grazed by one or more musket balls. 



WEST GTJLF SQUADRON. 287 

On tlie night of the 7th of November, 1861, aa expedition, eonf<isting of 
the first and second launches, under command of Lieutenants James E. Jouett 
and John J. Mitchell, accompanied by Mr. William Carter, gunner, and Acting 
Master's Mate Charles W. Adams, left the frigate Santee, then blockading off 
Galveston bar, Texas, for the purpose of surprising and burning the man-of-war- 
steamer General Rusk, lying under Pelican Island Fort. The expedition entered 
the harbor at 11.40 P. M., and succeeded in passing the armed schooner guard- 
ing the channel, and the Bolivar and Point Forts, without discovery, but unfor- 
tunately grounded on the Bolivar spit, and at this juncture was discovered. 

Lieutenant Jouett, deeming it imprudent, after this discovery, to encounter a 
vessel so large and so heavily armed and manned, determined to abandon that 
portion of the expedition. In returning, he boarded, and after a sharp conflict 
captured the armed schooner Jioyal Yacht. Several stands of arms, thirteen 
prisoners, and the rebel colors were captured. As the pilot of the expedition 
had been shot down, and the schooner had received a shell between wind and 
water, Lieutenant Jouett did not deem it advisable to bring her out. He there- 
fore burned her, after spiking the gun, a light 32-pounder. After this, the 
party returned to the ship. Lieutenant Jouett and Mr. William Carter, gunner, 
were seriously wounded, as were six men, one mortally, who afterward died. 
Flag-officer MoKean, upon receiving intelligence of this affiiir, issued a general 
order, to be read on the quarter-deck of every ship of the squadron, thanking 
the officers and men who composed the expedition, and expressing his conviction 
" that their names will be enrolled by a grateful country among those who in 
former years have shed so bright a lustre upon the American navy." 

On the afternoon of the 25th of March, 1862, two rebel steamers were dis- 
covered at Pass Christian. The New London, Lieutenant-Commanding Abner 
Reed, the blockading vessel, got under way immediately, and stood for that 
place, approaching as near as practicable on account of shoal water. The 
rebel boats approached within two thousand yards, when the engagement com- 
menced, the New London beginning the action on finding the enemy not disposed 
to come near her. The fight lasted one hour and fifty minutes, during which time 
the New London fired over one hundred and sixty shots of all kinds. The 
steamers of the enemy engaged were the Oregon and Pamlico ; they were struck 
several times; the New London was not hit during the action. After the 
engagement, the enemy left for the lakes. The New London remained on the 
ground until they were out of sight, and then returned to Ship Island. 

On the 3d of February, 1862, Captain D. G. Farragut sailed from Hampton 
PkOads, in the steam-sloop Hartford, to assume the duties of Flag-officer of the 
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. In addition to the ordinary blockade duties, 
he was especially charged with the reduction of the defences guarding the 
approaches to New Orleans, and the taking possession of that ,city. In his con- 
fidential instructions, he was informed that a fleet of bomb-vessels and armed 
steamers enough to manage them all, under command of Commander David D. 
Porter, would be directed to report to him. A large force of vessels, consisting 
of many of the best frigates and sloops in the service, recently fitting out at 
the various navy yards, had received orders to report to him at Key West. 
Eighteen thousand troops, under the command of Major General Benjamin F. 
Butler, were to co-operate with the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. Flag- 
officer Farragut arrived at Ship Island on the 20th of February, having been 
detained some time at Key West, and at once commenced active preparations 
for the attack on the defences of New Orleans. Much difliculty was experi- 
enced in getting the larger vessels over the bar, and in the case of the frigate 
Colorado, it was found impossible. On the 16th of March, the mortar vessels com- 



288 WEST GULF SQUADRON. 

menced the bombardment of ^ort Jackson assisted occasionally by tbe gunboats. 
On the 1st of April, Flag-officer Farragut detailed a force to cut and destroy the 
chain and raft across the river, and this hazardous undertaking was successfully 
carried through by Captain Bell, assisted by Lieutenant-Commanding Crosby, in 
the Pinolii, and Lieutenant-Commanding Caldwell, ia the Itasca. On the 23d of 
April, 1862, Flag-officer Farragut made his final preparations for the attack on 
and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. Every vessel was as well prepared 
as the ingenuity of her commander and officers could suggest. Chief Engineer 
Moore, of the Kiohmond, originated the idea of stopping the sheet-cables up 
and down on the sides of the ships in the line of the engines, which was 
immediately adopted by all the vessels. Each commander made his own ar- 
rangements for protecting the boilers or machinery, by coal, bags of ashes and sand, 
naval clothes bags, and in fact by every device imaginable. The bulwarks were 
lined with hammocks by some, by splinter-nettings made with ropes, by others. 
Some rubbed their vessels over with mud, to make them less visible. Lieutenant 
Cummings, the esecutive officer of the Richmond, made the valuable suggestion 
that white-washing the decks would give the men sufficient light in a night 
attack, and obviate the necessity of using lanterns, which were targets for the 
enemy to fire at. 

At 2 o'clock, A. M., April 24th, signal was made to get under way, but 
owing to the great difficulty in purchasing their anchors, the Pensacola and 
some of the other vessels were not under way until half-past three. The ves- 
sels then advanced in two columns, Captain Bailey leading the right and the 
advance in the gunboat Cayuga, he having been assigned to the first division of 
gunboats, which consisted of the Cayuga, Lieutenant-Commanding Harrison; 
the Oaeida, Commander Lee; Varuna, Commander Boggs; Katahdin, Lieu- 
tenant-Commanding Preble ; Kineo, Lieutenant-Commanding Ransom, and 
Wissahiofcon, Lieutenant-Commanding Albert Smith, supported by the steam- 
sloops Pensacola, Captain Blorris, and Blississippi, Commander M. Smith. 
This division was to attack Fort St. Philip. The second division of the 
column was led by the flag-ship Hartford, followed by the Brooklyn, Captain 
Craven, the Richmond, Commander Aldea, and the second division of gunboats, 
led by Fleet Captain Bell, in the Sciota, Lieutenant Commanding Donaldson, 
followed by the Iroquois, Commander De Camp ; Kennebeck, Lieutenant-Com- 
manding Russell; Pinola, Lieutenant-Commanding Crosby; Itasca, Lieutenant- 
Commanding Caldwell, and Winona, Lieutenant-Commanding Nichols, in the 
order named. 

The enemy's lights, while they discovered the vessels to them, were at the 
same time guides to the squadron, which soon passed the barrier chains, the 
right taking Fort St. Philip, and the left Fort Jackson. As the fire became 
general, the smoke grew so dense that it was very difficult to distinguish friends 
from foes. Commander Porter had, by previous arrangement, moved up to 
a certain point on the Fort Jackson side with his gunboats, while his mortar 
vessels, assisted by the sloop of war Portsmouth, engaged the water batteries to 
the south and eastward of Fort Jackson, and poured a terrific fire of shells into 
it. A fire-raft was discovered coming down upon the Hartford, and in attempt- 
ing to avoid it the ship was run on shore, where the rebel ram Manassas, which 
had not previously been seen, pushed the raft down upon the flag-ship, which 
was soon on fire half way up to her tops ; she was backed ofi', and through the 
good organization of the fire department, and the great exertions of Captain 
Wainwright and his first lieutenant, officers and crew, the fire was extinguished. 

In the mean time the battery of the Hartford was pouring its missiles of 
death into Fort St. Philip, which was soon silenced, with the exception of a gun 



WEST GULP SQUADRON. 289 

now and tten. By this time the enemy's gunboats, thirteen in number, 
besides two iron-okds, the Manassas and Louisiana, had become visible ; they 
were taken in hand, and in a short time eleven of them V7ere destroyed. The 
fleet was now fairly past the forts, and the victory was won. Several gun- 
boats were still making resistance. Two of them had attacked the Varuna, which 
vessel, by her greater speed, was in advance of her consorts ; they ran into her 
and caused her to sink, but not before she had destroyed her advers.aries j and 
when the Hartford passed, the wrecks of the three vessels were lying side by side. 
Just as the scene appeared to be closing, the ram Manassas was observed coming 
up at full speed, to attack the Hartford. Flag-officer Farragut directed Captain 
Smith, in the Mississippi, to turn and run her down. The order was instantly 
obeyed by that vessel turning and going at her at full speed. But when 
within fifty yards of each other, the ram put her helm hard aport and ran ashore ; 
the Mississippi poured two broadsides into her, and sent lier drifting down the 
river a total wreck. This closed the morning's fight. 

Captain Bailey had preceded the flag-ship up to the quarantine station, and 
had captured the Chalmette regiment. By order of Flag-officer Farragut, the 
officers and men were paroled the same day. Owing to the slowness of some 
of the vessels, and want of knowledge of the river, the fleet did not reach the 
English turn until about 10 A. M. on the 25th. The fleet was now formed in 
two columns as before. Captain Bailey was still far in advance, not having 
noticed the signal for close order, which was to enable the slow vessels to come 
up ; they opened on him a galling fire from the Chalmette batteries, but the 
larger vessels soon came to his assistance, and ranged in one after another, 
delivering their broadsides with such telling efiect that the batteries were 
silenced and the rebel troops driven out. 

The fleet then passed up to the city and anchored immediately in front of it. 
Captain Bailey was sent on shore to demand the surrender of New Orleans from 
the authorities. The Mayor replied that the city was under martial law. 
General Lovell, who was present, said he would surrender nothing; but in order 
to free the city from embarrassment, he would restore the authorities, and retire 
with his troops, which he did. All the steamboats lying at the levee were 
seized and sent down to quarantine for General Butler's forces. The levee of 
New Orleans was one scene of desolation. Ships, steamers, cotton, coal, etc., 
were all in one common blaze, and the ingenuity of the squadron was much 
taxed to avoid the conflagration. 

Flag-officer Farragut then pushed on to Carrollton, eight miles above, where 
there were two other forts which were found deserted. 

On the 28th of April, Forts Jackson and St. Philip, after a bombardment of 
one hundred and forty-four consecutive hours, by the mortar flotilla, surrendered 
to Commander David D, Porter. 

On the 29th, General Butler reached New Orleans, and made arrangements 
for bringing up his troops, which were soon afterward in full possession of the 
city. Flag-officer Farragut sent an officer on shore, who hoisted the American 
flag on the custom-house, and hauled down the Louisiana State flag from the city 
hall. A force of seven vessels, under command of Captain Craven, were sent 
up the river to keep up the panic as far as possible. A detachment of the 
smaller vessels, under Commander Lee, were sent as high as Vicksburg. Flag- 
officer Farragut, in his official report, tendered his thanks to Captains Bailey and 
Bell, the division commanders, for the gallant, cordial and efficient manner in 
which they performed the part assigned them in the capture of New Orleans. 
Secretary Welles addressed congratulatory letters to Flag-officer Farragut and 
19 



290 WEST GULP SQUADRON. 

Commander David D. Porter, and these officers and their commands received 
the thanks of Congress. 

Commander Palmer arrived off Baton Eouge, with the Iroquois, IMay 7th, and 
demanded its surrender; the conditions to be the same as at New Orleans. 
The authorities declining to yield the city voluntarily, Commander Palmer pro- 
ceeded abreast of the arsenal, landed a force and took possession of the same 
tosether with other public property, and hoisted the national flag. Commander 
S.'P. Lee, commanding the advance of the squadron, arrived near Vioksburg, 
May 18th, and demanded the surrender of the place. The demand was defiantly 
decUned, by both the civil and military authorities. Commaudor Lee ordered 
the removal of the women and children beyond the reach of harm, so that 
it might be at his option to fire or not fire, as he thought proper, upon the 
defences of the town without causing the loss of innocent life. Uear Admiral 
Farragut arrived a few days afterward, accompanied by a column of troops, 
under General Williams. Subsequently an additional military and naval force, 
including the mortar flotilla, was brought up, and preparations were made for 
attacking and passing the batteries. These batteries were placed on the heights 
of Vicksburg, scarcely within reach of the guns of the squadron, and were sup- 
ported by a large army in the rear. 

On the 28th of June, the mortar vessels commenced the bombaidment The 
batteries were silenced by the combined fire of the squadron and flotilla at 
times; but there being an insuf&cient land force to co-operate, the insurgents 
returned to their guns. 

On the 2d of July, Flag-officer Davis, the commander of the Mississippi 
flotilla, with a force of gunboats and several mortar vessels, joined Rear Admi- 
ral Farragut above Vicksburg. On the 15th of July, the rebel ram Arkansas 
came out of the Yazoo river, and passed through the fleets of Farragut and 
Davis, and took refuge under the batteries of Vicksburg. Flag-officer Farra- 
gut, with his vessels, passed down the river, with the determination of destroy- 
ing the ram if possible. But by delays in getting in position, it was so dark 
when he reached the town, that nothing could be seen but the flashes of the 
guns, so that the vessels were obliged to go down and anchor, to protect the 
transports, etc. 

Returning, Flag-officer Farragut reached New Orleans July 28th, and leaving 
an adequate force at that place and Baton Rouge, sailed again on the 11th of 
August, for Ship Island and Pensacola. The latter place having been evacu- 
ated by the rebels, it had been made the depot of the West Gulf Squadron. 

While the iron-clad Essex and the gunboats Kineo, Katahdin and Sumpter 
were lying ofi' Baton Rouge, a vigorous attack was made by the insurgents, 
August 5th, on the command of General Williams, occupying that place, and 
its recapture attempted by a largely superior force, led by General Breckin- 
ridge, late Vice President. The gunboats were immediately placed in position 
to give assistance, if required. The relative positions of the forces were such 
that the gunboats could not, with safety, be made available to the troops until 
late in the day, when they poured a fire into the rebels' left wing, which caused 
them to withdraw in haste, and fall back several miles. A simultaneous attack 
by land and water appears to have been the design of the enemy. The rebel 
ram Arkansas, which was to have taken part in it, removed a short distance 
above Baton Rouge, and the next morning the Essex, Commander AVilliam 
Porter, proceeded up the river and encountered her, and after a short engage- 
ment the Arkansas was abandoned, and blown up. 

About the middle of September, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. W. Kit- 
tridge, of the bark Arthur, took possession of Corpus Christi. A little later, 



WEST GTILF SQUADRON. 291 

« 

Acting- iMaster Francis Crocker, commanding the steamer Kensington, captured 
the defences of Sabine city, and took possession thereof. 

On the 4th of October, Commander William B. Kenshaw, of the steamer 
"Westfield, with that vessel, the Harriet Lane, Owasco and Clifton, captured the 
defences of the harbor and city of Galveston, there having been only a feeble 
resistance. 

The gunboats and transports passing up and down the Mississippi were 
annoyed by frequent attacks from guerillas and concealed batteries. In many 
instances tjiese attacks were made from villages, the parties engaged in them 
presuming that the fire would not be returned, to endanger innocent life. To 
check the practice, it became necessary, after giving due notice, to fire upon 
and destroy to some extent the towns from which the attacks were made. 

On New Year's day, 1863, the gunboats blockading Galveston, were attacked 
by four rebel vessels. The Harriet Lane, after a desperate resistance, was car- 
ried by boarding. Commander Wainwright was killed on the quarter-deck, 
and hid executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander Lee, was mortally wounded. 
The steamer Westfield, in going to the assistance of her consort, grounded, and 
to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy, Commander Renshaw blew 
her up, that officer. Lieutenant Zimmerman, Chief Engineer Green, and nearly 
a dozen men perishing with her. 

On the 11th of January, the United States steamer Hatteras, a purchased 
vessel, Lieutenant H. C. Blake commanding, was sunk by the piratical steamer 
Alabama, oflf the Coast of Texas. The Hatteras was one of the blockading 
vessels off Galveston, and had been ordered to chase the steamer, which after- 
ward proved to be the Alabama. 

In March, 1863, Rear Admiral Farragut, with a strong force of vessels, 
moved up the Mississippi, intending to attempt the passage of the Port Hudson 
batteries. Only his own vessel, the Hartford, and the steamer Albatross were suc- 
cessful. With them he approached Vicksburg and opened communication 
with Acting Rear Admiral Porter, of the Mississippi Squadron, and General 
Grant, both of whom were operating against Vicksburg. 

The navy now had control of the river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson, 
and was enabled to establish a blockade of Red river, and thus intercept the 
supplies from Texas, destined for the rebel armies. The steam-sloop Missis- 
sippi, one of the finest vessels in Farragut's squadron, grounded, and was 
destroyed in the attack on and attempted passage of the batteries at Port Hud- 
son, March 14th, 1863. 

Lieutenant-Commander. Cummings, executive officer of the Richmond, was 
mortally wounded in the same attack. He was one of the most gallant and 
promising young officers in the service. 

After establishing a blockade of Red river. Rear Admiral Farragut left his 
flag-ship, and returning below by way of the Atchafalaya, resumed operations 
for a final assault on Port Hudson. A force was always kept ready to co-ope- 
rate with the army in its movements, and On the part of the navy a continuous 
shelling of the place from mortar boats, vessels, and a naval battery on shore 
manned by seamen, was maintained. Nearly three thousand 13-inch shells 
were thrown into the vyorks by the mortar vessels, and the naval battery of 
four 9-inch guns, used as a breaching battery, performed good service. In con- 
sequence of the capture of Vicksburg on the 4th of July, the reduction of Port 
Hudson became inevitable, and the garrison finally surrendered on the 9th of 
July to General Banks, who for some weeks had besieged the place. The river 
being now open to peaceful commercial pursuits, Rear Admiral Farragut turned 



292 WEST GULP SQUADRON. 

over to Acting Rear Admiral Porter tte entire control of the western waters 
above New Orleans, and departed for that city. 

Rear Admiral Farragut was now tendered and accepted a leave of absence, 
and Uommodore H. H. Bell, the nest officer in rank, was appointed to the tempo- 
rary command of the squadron. 

While Eear Admiral Farragut was engaged on the Mississippi in active opera- 
tions against the enemy, others of his command were enforcing a rigid blockade 
" of the G-ulf coast. The Rio Grande being the boundary between the United 
States and Mexico, was open to the navigation of both countries, and could not, 
therefore, be blockaded. With the knowledge of this fact a multitude of 
schemes were projected, and under the guise of neutral trade, Matamoras sud- 
denly became a great commercial mart for the rebels and their friends. But the 
occupation of the Rio Grande and Brownsville put a final termination to the 
extensive commerce of Matamoras, which became as insignificant as it was before 
the rebellion. 

The occupation of Brownsville was followed by a like movement at Brazos, 
Aranzas and Cabello passes, in all of which the naval forces detailed by Com- 
mander Bell and placed under command of Commander J. H. Strong, afforded 
all required assistance. This possession of the several ports of Texas was of 
short duration. After a four months' occupation, the military forces were with- 
drawn, and the duty of guarding that extensive coast again devolved exclusively 
upon the navy. 

The bay of Mobile, guarded at its entrance by two formidable fortifications 
constructed by the government in former years, was difficult to blockade, and 
was one of the principal ports for trade with the rebels. It had been the inten- 
tion of the Navy Department to get possession of that bay, as soon as operations 
on the Mississippi would permit the detachment of a sufficient co-operative 
military force for the expedition. In this there was delay, caused by the army 
being fully occupied in other quarters. In the meantime, the rebels, availing 
themselves of the advantages of their position, proceeded to the construction and 
collection of a formidable navy, with the view of raising the blockade. The 
information received was of such a character that the Department deemed it 
important that Rear Admiral Farragut should resume his command, which he 
did, and on the 18th of Januaty, 1864, arrived off Mobile. 

Knowing the disadvantages of attacking iron-cased vessels with wooden ones, 
and that, too, in the face and under the guns of heavy fortresses, without a co- 
operative land force, he deferred the movement until the necessary elements of 
success could reach him. But in the meantime he stood ever ready to meet and 
measure his strength with the iron-clad fleet of Buchanan, should it venture to 
come out._ Thus he constantly threatened an attack on Blobile, thereby aiding 
the army in its general movements elsewhere. 

Military co-operation was secured early in July, and two iron-clads from the 
James river and two from the Mississippi having reached him. Rear Admiral 
Farragut made his final preparations for his attack on the rebel defences of 
Mobile bay. 

On the 8th of July, Rear Admiral Farragut held a consultation with Generals 
Canhy and Granger, on board the Hartford, on the subject of an attack upon 
Forts Morgan and Gaines, at which it was agreed that General Canby would send 
all the troops he could spare to co-operate with the fleet. Circumstances soon 
obliged General Canby to inform Rear Admiral Farragut that he could not 
spare a sufficient number of troops to invest both forts ; and in reply Farragut 
suggested that Fort Gaines should be the first invested, engaging to have a force 



WEST GULP SQUADRON. 293 

on the sound ready' to cover tLe landing of the army on Dauphin Island, in the 
rear of that fort. 

Lieuteuant-Commander De Kraft, of the Conemaugh, was detailed to that 
duty. 

A second consultation between Rear Admiral Farragut and General Granger 
■was held on board the Hartford on the 1st of August, and the 4th of the month 
was fixed upon as the day for the landing of the troops, and the entrance of the 
fleet into the bay. But owing to the unavoidable delay of the iron-clad Tecumseh 
at Pensaoola, the fleet was not ready to move. General Granger, however, was 
up to time, and the troops actually landed on Dauphin Island. In the light of 
subsequent events the delay proved an advantage, as the rebels were busily 
engaged daring the 4th in throwing troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of 
which were captured a few days afterward. 

The Tecumseh arrived on the evening' of the 4th, and everything being pro- 
pitious, the attack was commenced on the following morning. The fleet was 
under way by 5.40 A. M., in the following order, two abreast and lashed 
together : Brooklyn, Captain James Alder, with the Ootorara, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander C. H. Green, on the port side; flag-ship Hartford, Captain Percival 
Drayton, with the Metacomet, Lieutenant-Commander J. E. Jouett ; Richmond, 
Captain T. A. Jenkins, with the Port Royal, Lieutenant-Commander B. Gher- 
ardij Lackawanna, Captain J. B. Marchand, with the Seminole, Commander E. 
Donaldson; Monongahela, Commander J. H. Strong, with the Kennebec, Lieu- 
tenant-Commander W. P. McCann; Ossipee, Commander W. E. Le Roy, with 
the Itasca, Lieutenant-Commander George Brown; Oneida, Commander J. R. 
Mullany, with the Galena, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Welles. The iron- 
clad Tecumseh, Commander T. H. M. Craven ; the Winnebago, Commander 
T. H. Stevens ; the Manhattan, Commander J. W. A. Nicholson ; and the Chicka- 
saw, Lieutenant-Commander G. H. Perkins, were already inside the bar, and 
had been ordered to take up their position on the starboard side of the wooden 
vessels, or between them and Fort Morgan, for the double purpose of keeping 
down the fire' of the water battery, and the parapet guns of the fort, as well as 
to attiick the ram Tennessee as soon as the fort was passed.' 

At the urgent request of the captains and commanding officers of the fleet, 
Rear Admiral Farragut yielded to the Brooklyn being the leading ship-of-the- 
line, as she had four chase guns, and an ingenious arrangement for picking up 
torpedoes; aod because, in their judgment, the flag-ship should not be too much 
exposed. The attacking ships steamed steadily up the main ship channel, the 
Tecumscjh firing the first shot at forty-seven minutes past six o'clock. 

At six minutes past seven o'clock, the fort opeued upon the fleet, and was 
replied to by a gun from the Brooklyn, and immediately afterward the action 
became general. 

It was soon apparent that there was some diificulty ahead. The Brooklyn 
having got into shoal water, stopped, and by so doing arrested the advance of 
the fleet, while at the same time the guns of the fort were playing with great 
effect upon that vessel and the Hartford. A moment after, the iron-clad 
Tecumseh was struck by a torpedo, and disappeared almost instantaneously 
beneath the waves, carrying down her gallant cummander and nearly all her 
crew. At this juncture, Rear Admiral B'arragut, after ordering the Metacomet 
to send a boat to save, if possible, any of the perishing crew of the Tecumseh, 
dashed ahead with the Hartford, closely followed by the Brooklyn and the other 
ships. The Hartford steamed through the buojs where the torpedoes were to 
have been sunk, Farragut believing that from thuir having been some time in 
the water they were partially innocuous, and determined to take the chatioe of 



294 WEST GULF SQUADRON. 

their explosion. From the moment the vessels turned to the northwestward to 
clear the middle ground, they were enahled to keep suoh broadside fire upon the 
batteries of Fort Morgan that the rebel guns did comparatively little injury. 

Just as Farragut passed the fort, about ten minutes before eight o'clock, the 
ram dashed at the flag-ship, as had been expected, and in anticipation of which 
the monitors had been ordered on the starboard side. He took no further notice 
of the ram than to return her fire. The rebel gunboats Morgan, Gaines and 
Selma were ahead, and the latter particularly annoyed the flag-ship with a 
raking fire which her guns could not return. At 8 A. M., Farragut ordered 
the Metacomet to cast off and go in pursuit of the Selma. Captain Jouett was 
after her in a moment, and in an hour's time he had her as a prize. The Morgan 
and Gaines succeeded in escaping under the guns of Fort Morgan. The Gaines 
was so injured that she had to be run ashore, where she was subsequently de- 
stroyed ; but the Morgan escaped to Mobile during the night, although she was 
chased and fired upon. 

Having passed the forts and dispersed the enemy's gunboats, most of the 
vessels were ordered to anchor, when the ram Tennessee was perceived standing 
for the flag-ship. This was at forty-five minutes past eight. The monitors and 
such of the wooden vessels as were best adapted for the purpose, were imme- 
diately ordered to attack the ram, not only with their guns, but with bows on at 
full speed. 

The Monongahela, Commander Strong, was the first vessel that struck her, 
and in doing so carried away her own iron prow, together with the cutwater, 
without apparently doing her adversary much injury. The Lackawanna, Captain 
Marchand, was the next vessel to strike her, whieh she did at full speed ; but 
though her stem was out and crushed to her plankeuds for the distance of three 
feet above the water's edge to five feet below, the only perceptible effect on the 
ram was to give her a heavy list. 

The Hartford was the third vessel which struck her, but as the Tennessee 
quickly shifted her helm the blow was a glancing one, and as she rasped along 
the side the flag-ship poured a whole port broadside of 9-inch solid shot within 
ten feet of her casement. The monitors working slowly, delivered their fire as 
opportunity offered. The Chickasaw succeeded ia getting under her stern, and 
a fifteeu-iuch shot from the Manhattan broke through her iron plating and heavy 
wooden backing, though the missile itself did not enter the vessel. 

Immediately after the collision with the flag-ship, Captain Drayton was 
directed to bear down for the ram again. He was doing so at full speed, when 
unfortunately the Lackawanna ran into the Hartford just forward of the mizzen- 
mast, cutting her down to within two feet of the water's edge. The flag-ship 
was soon got clear again, and was rapidly approaching the Tennessee, when she 
struck her colors and run up the white flag. Just at this time she was sorely 
beset, the Chickasaw was pounding away at her stern ; the Ossipee was approach- 
ing her at full speed, and the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and the Hartford 
were bearing down upon her, determined upon her destruction. Her smoke- 
stack had been shot away, her steering chains were gone, compelling a resort to 
her relieving tackles, and several of her port shutters were jammed.' From the 
time the Hartford struck her, until her surrender, she never fired a trun. 

During this contest with the rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, and 
which terminated by her surrender at ten o'clock, many more men were lost 
than froni the fire of the batteries of Fort Morgan. Admiral Buciianan was 
wounded in the leg, two or three of his men were killed, and five or six wounded. 
Commander Johnson, formerly of the United States Navy, was in command of 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 295 

the Tennessee, and came on board the flag-ship to surrender his sword and that 
of Admiral Buchanan. Thus terminated the famous naval battle of August 5th, 
1864. 

The wounded of both sides were sent to Pensacola for medical treatment. 

On the following day, one of the iron-clads shelled Fort Gaines with such 
effect, that Colonel Anderson, the commander, sent a communication to Bear 
Admiral Farragut offering to surrender. General Granger, commanding the 
military forces, was sent for, and the terms of capitulation were signed by the 
respective parties on board of the Hartford. 

From this time active movements were in progress for the reduction of Fort 
Morgan, and on the 22d of August, at daylight, a bombardment was opened 
from the shore batteries, the monitors and ships inside and the vessels outside 
the bay. At 6 A. M. of the 23d, a white flag was displayed by the rebels, and 
at 2 P. M. the fort was unconditionally surrendered to the navy and army of 
the United States. Fort Powell had been attacked on the night of the -Sth and 
blown up. 

The capture of Forts Powell, Gaines and Morgan, and the destruction of the 
rebel fleet gave the government possession of the bay, and closed the port 
against all illicit trade with the rebels. As late as September 13th, Rear Admi- 
ral Farragut informed the department that he was engaged in removing torpedoes 
which had been strewn in the bay to obstruct naval operations. 

Vice Admiral Farragut left the West Gulf Squadron in the autumn of 1864, 
the command devolving on Commodore James S. Palmer, senior officer of the 
station. Commodore Palmer continued operations until the arrival of Admiral 
Farragut's successor. Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher. The resumption of 
offensive operations against the city of Mobile, under direction of Major-General 
Canby, were not determined upon until early in January, 1865, when Acting 
Rear Admiral Thatcher, then recently appointed to the command of the West 
Gulf Squadron, was ordered to proceed immediately to New Orleans, in order to 
co-operate with the military commander. 

A joint movement by land and water was arranged and carried into execution. 
Indications that the rebels were about to evacuate the city led to a naval recon- 
noissance, in order to ascertain the facts, on the 11th of March with four monitors, 
in as close proximity as the shallow water and obstructions would permit. This 
movement drew from the insurgents such a fire as to demonstrate beyond 
doubt the fact that the defences of the city were still intact. The troops were 
landed on the 21st of March on the left bank of Fisher's river, and pushed for- 
ward as rapidly as the condition of the roads would permit, while the naval 
vessels shelled the woods and kept open communication by signals with General 
Canby for co-operation. It was thought by the rebels that the naval vessels 
would not be able to cross the bar of Blakely river ; and even if successful 
in crossing, that they would be destroyed by torpedoes, with which the river 
was filled. They succeeded in sinking two of the monitors, the Milwaukee 
and the Osage, and four wooden gunboats at the entrance of Blakely river. 
Beyond the sinking of these vessels and the loss of a few lives, no serious conse- 
quences attended the approach to and capture of Mobile. 

The principal defensive works between the city and the forts at the entrance 
of the bay captured in August 1864, by Vice Admiral Farragut, were Port 
Alexis and Spanish Fort. By the 3d of April these had been completely 
invested by the troops, and during the night of the 8th and morniag of the 
9th they were, after a short but severe bombardment, captured, and with them 
from 1,600 to 2,000 men, with sixteen heavy guns. Batteries Tracy and Huger 
were evacuated on the evening of the 11th. On the 12th it was ascertained 



296 MISSISSIPPI SQUADKON. 

that all the remaining defences of the place had been abandoned. A formal 
surrender of the city was demanded by General Granger and Acting Rear Ad- 
miral Thatcher, which was complied with. The works which surrounded Mobile 
were of immense strength and extent. Nearly 400 guQS were captured, some of 
them of the heaviest calibre. 

Preparations were now made to follow the rebel forces in their retreat up the 
Tombigbee river, but on the 4th of May propositions were received from Com- 
mander Farrand, commanding the rebel naval forces in the waters of Alabama, 
to surrender all the vessels, officers, men and property afloat and under 
blockade on the Tombigbee. On the 10th of May the formal surrender took 
place, and the insurgent navy ceased to be an organization. Sabine Pass and 
Galveston, the only remaining rebel fortified points on the Gulf coast, soon capit- 
ulated. The forts at Sabine Pass were evacuated on the 25th of May, and on 
the 2d of June Galveston was surrendered, and the supremacy of the govern- 
ment was once more established on the entire coast, from Maine to Texas. 



THE MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 

In the summer of 1861, Commander John Rodgers was ordered to the West 
for the purpose of purchasing, arming and equipping a force of gunboats to operate 
on the Mississippi river and its tributary streams. 

In August Commander Andrew H. Poote was appointed to the command of the 
Mississippi flotilla. Flag-officer Foote on his arrival at St, Louis on the 6th of 
September, 1861, found that his force consisted of three wooden gunboats in 
commission, and that there were nine iron-clad vessels and thirty-eight mortar 
boats in course of construction. 

The first important operation of Flag-officer Foote's flotilla was the attack and 
capture of Fort Henry, on the Tennessee river, on the 6th of February, 1862. 

As soon as four of the iron-clads were ready for service. Flag-officer Foote 
conferred with Brigadier-General Grant, commanding at Cairo, as to the pro- 
priety of making a joint attack upon Fort Henry, on the Tennessee river. After 
consultation with Major-General Halleck, Brigadier-General Grant agreed to 
unite his forces with those of Flag-officer Poote in the proposed attack. 

At 12,30 P. M., on the 6th of February, 1862, Flag-officer Foote commenced 
the bombardment of Fort Henry. The attacking force consisted of the flag-ship 
Cincinnati, Commander Stemble ; the Essex, Commander W. D. Porter ; Caron- 
delet. Commander Walke ; St. Louis, Lieutenant-Commanding Paulding; Con- 
estoga, Lieutenant-Commanding S. L. Phelps; Tyler, Lieutenant-Commanding 
Gwin and the Lexington, Lieutenant-Commanding Shirk. The fire was 
opened at 1,700 yards distant by the flag-ship, the others following in succession, 
and continued while the fleet steamed slowly to within 600 yards of the fort. 
After a sharp action of an hour and a quarter the rebel flag was lowered from 
the lort, and General Tilghman and his command surrendered to Flag-officer 
1^ oote, and were turned over to Brigadier-General Grant on his arrival an hour 
atterward with the military force. The attack was to have been a joint one, 
but the impassable condition of the roads delaved the army and prevented its co- 
operation with the fleet. 

Lieutenant-Commanding Phelps, of the Conestoga, having with him the 
iyler and Lexington, and acting under orders previously received, proceeded up 
the lennessee nver. He reached Florence, Alabama, which was as far as the 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 297 

draught of his vessels permitted him to go. Several valuable prizes were taken ; 
one of them the large steamer Eastport, which the rebels were converting into a 
gunboat. From Port Henry, Flag-officer Footc proceeded with a portion of his 
flotilla to the Cumberland river, to make an attack on Fort Donelson. On the 
14th of Febiuary, with the iron-elads St. Louis (flag-ship), Carondelet, Louis- 
ville and Pittsburg, and the wooden gunboats Tyler and Oonestnga, he engaged 
that fort and its adjacent water batteries. With a much reduced force he had to 
contend against more formidable works than he had met ou the6th,atFiirt Henry. 

After a severe fight of an hour and a half, during whicli Flag iifficL;r Foote 
was seriously wounded, when he wjs on the point of enfilading the fjrt, and 
the rebel fire had materially slackened, the St. Louis aud Louisville were 
disabled in their steering apparatus, and with the remaining boats, retired for 
the night. The rebels were so greatly demoralized that th^y cuuld not be 
brought into efiective action on the following day, which resulted in their defeat 
and the surrender of Fort Donelson to JBrigadier-Goneral Crraut, cumnuioder of 
the military forces. With the gunboats Conestoga and Cairo. Flair-officei- Foote 
ascended . the Cumberland, and on the 19th of February seized ClarksviJle and 
the three forts which defended the city and river. On the i!7th of February the 
army took possession of the city of Nashville. Flag-officer Foote then returned 
to Cairo. 

On the 4th of March, a force of gunboats accompanied by transports convey- 
ing troops, moved upon Columbus, on the Mississippi river. Alarmed by a 
reconnoissance two days previously, the garrison had abandoned the place, and 
■when the national forces arrived, the forts, though of uuufiual htrenyth, were 
unoccupied. On the 14th, Flag-officer Foote left Cairo, with a force of ten iron- 
clads and ten mortar boats, and having been joined by Col. Kufoid, with fifteen 
hundred troops, at Columbus, moved down and took possession of Hickman. 
Arriving the next day in the vicinity of Island No. 10, the murtar vessels in 
charge of Captain Maynadier were placed in position and shelled out several 
encampments. 

A siege of twenty-three days followed, during which a canal was cut to admit 
the light transports to reach the army of General Pope, at New Madrid, below 
Island No. 10, and permit him to cross to the Tennessee shore. A formidable 
battery was spiked, and a floating battery was shelled out of the channel to enable 
two gunboats, the Carondelet and Pittsburg, to run the blockade, which they did 
at night in a heavy thunder-storm, under a tremendous fire from forty-seven guns. 
Several batteries, erected to prevent the army of Brigadier-General Pope from 
crossing, were demolished by the two gunboats, and the landing was effected. This 
result accomplished, the rebel commander became convinced that he could not 
avoid defeat from a combined assault, and, therefore, on the 7th of April, surren- 
dered Island No. 10 to the commander of the naval forces. 

One rebel gunboat, four transports, immense munitions of war, and many 
prisoners fell into the hands of the United States forces by this important 
capture. 

Flag-officer Foote next proceeded to the vicinity of Fort Pillow, where he 
was joined by Brigadier-General Pope and his army. Arrangements were 
promptly made for an immediate combined attack on the fortifications ; but just 
upon the point of execution, an order from General Halleok, for the army to 
reinforce him at Corinth, frustrated the well-matured plans that had been made. 

Flag-officer Foote, suffering from the long-neglected wound he received at 
Fort Donelson, was, on the 9th of May, relieved by the Department, on the 
advice of the surgeons, of the command of the flotilla, which was transferred to 
Captain Charles H. Davis. 



298 MISSISSIPPI SQUABKON. 

On tte 11th of May, an attack, for wHch the rebel fleet, lying below Fort 
Pillow, had been preparing, was made upon Flag-officer Davis' flotilla. Eight 
iron-clad steamers, four of them fitted as rams, steamed up, fully prepared for an 
engagement, and the flotilla was soon in motion to receive them. An action 
of an hour, at the closest quarters, followed, at the end of which the enemy 
retreated under the guns of Fort Pillow, three of their gunboats having been 
disabled. After this engagement, the ram fleet, under Colonel Ellett, joined 
Flag-officer Davis, and on the 5th of June Fort Pillow was abandoned. 

The flotilla then moved down the river, and on the evening of the 7th 
anchored a mile and a half above Memphis. The next morning, the rebel fleet 
of eight gunboats and rams, was discovered opposite the city. The flotilla came 
up and engaged them. The ram fleet pressed into action under full steam, the 
gunboats in the meantime keeping up a well-directed fire. Two of the rebel 
gunboats blew up, and the Queen of the West, commanded by Colonel Ellett 
in person, encountered the General Lovell and sunk her. A running fight 
followed, carrying the vessels several miles below the city, resulting in ihe 
capture or destruction of the entire rebel fleet, except the Van Dorn, which 
escaped. Flag-officer Davis returned to Memphis and demanded the surrender 
of the city, which was complied withj Colonel Fitch arriving at 12 o'clock 
from Fort Pillow, and taking military possession. 

On the 29 th of June, Flag-officer Davis left Memphis with a part of his flotilla 
and six mortar boats, and on the 20th of July following joined Eear Admiral 
Farragut above Vicksburg, the latter officer with a portion of his squadron 
having arrived there a few days previous. The mortar vessels of each squadron 
bombarded the defences of Vicksburg for some days from both above and 
below. 

An expedition was sent, on the 18th of July, to procure information respect- 
ing the obstructions and defences of the Yazoo ; but the river was scarcely 
entered when the rebel iron-clad ram Arkansas was encountered coming down, 
and notwithstanding a severe conflict with the gunboats Carondelet and Tyler, 
succeeded in passing through the fleets of Farragut and Davis, and took refuge 
under the batteries of Vicksburg. An attempt was made to destroy the Arkan- 
sas under the guns of the battery, but it did not succeed. 

Late in July, Flag-officer Davis withdrew his command to the mouth of the 
Yazoo river, the reduction of Vicksburg being abandoned for want of a sufficient 
military force to co-operate. 

In August an expedition up the Yazoo, under joint command of Flag-officer 
Davis and General Curtis, was entirely successful ; a battery of heavy guns and 
large quantities of munitions of war were captured. 

A detachment from the squadron, under the command of Commander H. H. 
Kelty, with the 46th Indiana regiment under Colonel Fitch, lefc Memphis for 
White river, on June 13th, their object being to form a junction with General 
Curtis. 

On the morning of the 17th they arrived at the rebel fortifications near St. 
Charles, Arkansas, upon which an attack was commenced by the gunboats, 
whilst Colonel Fitch landed for the purpose of assaulting the rear. The enemy's 
front battery was carried by the gunboats, and Colonel Fitch gallantly charged 
the second battery and carried it without the loss of a single man. A shot 
entered and exploded the steam-drum of the Mound City, killin"- and woundin"- 
a large portion of her officers and men. 

The gunboats Tyler, Lieutenant-Commanding Gwin, and Lesino-ton, Lieu- 
tenant-Commanding James W. Shirk, of the Western flotilla, preceded the 
march of the army southward on the line of the Tennessee river, and rendered 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADEON. 299 

efficient service by convoying the transports, clearing the banks of rebel bat- 
teries, frustrating attempts of the insurgents to fortify, and by their partiuipation 
in the battle of Shiloh. 

In September, 1862, Flag-offieer Davis was relieved of the commnnJ of the 
Mississippi Squadron by Acting Rear Admiral David D. Porter, who at once 
began active operations against tlie enemy. 

In the month of November, Captain H. Walks, of the Carhndelet, received 
orders to take command of an expedition of iron-olads and wooden guuboats, and 
proceed down the Mississippi river to a point as near the mouth of (he Yazoo 
as he could approach, and, if possible, to enter that river. The object of the 
expedition was to prevent the erection of batteries at the mouth of the Y.izoo, 
and to obtain control of a portion of the river, in order to afford good lauding- 
plaoes for the troops under G-eneral McClernand, who was expected to arrive in 
a few weeks. On the 11th of December, Captain Walke despatched the gun- 
boats Marmora and Signal up the Yazoo on a reconnoissance. Having ascended 
about twenty miles they were apprised of the presence of torpedoes by the explo- 
sion of one near the Signal. Captains Getty, of the Marmora, and Soutt, of the 
Signal, were confident they could clear the river of all obstruotioni, if their 
vessels were protected from the rebel infantry and artillery by a force of iron- 
clads. Captain Walke resolved to make the attempt, and on the 12th sent the 
gunboats up the Yazoo on a second expedition, accompanied by the iron-elads 
Baron de Kalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker ; Cairo, Lieutonant-Commauder 
Selfridge, and Pittsburg, Lieutenant-Commanding Hoel. 

The expedition returned the same evening, reporting that a large number of 
torpedoes had been destroyed; but, that in spite of every precaution, the iron-clad 
Cairo had been sunk by one of them, fortunately without loss of life. 

A few days after the loss of the Cairo, Acting Rear Admiral Porter arrived at 
the mouth of the Yazoo, and led an expedition up the river to clear the channel of 
torpedoes, and also, by the movement, to draw a portion of the rebel army From 
Vicksburg to the defence of the river. Great numbers of torpedoes were taken 
from the channel, the boats engaged in the undertaking being to some extent 
annoyed by the rebel sharp-shooters that lined the banks. 

By the 26fch of the month the river was cleared of all obstructions to the place 
where the Cairo was sunk, and Acting Rear Admiral Porter had obtained control 
of several good landing places. 

On the 27th, the expedition arrived at a bend of the river where a line of 
fortifications commenced, and a large raft across the channel, covered with heavy 
railroail iron, seemed to forbid farther progress. Although much annoyed by 
the fire from the batteries, the boats continued their work, and the iron-clad 
Benton, flag-ship, moved up to cover them. It was blowing very hard at the 
time, the current being checked by the wind, and the Benton, a vessel at all 
times difficult to manage, had a tendency to turn head or broadside to 
the wind, in consequence of which she had to be tied to the bank. The enemy 
then directed their guns upon her, almost every shot taking effect. She was 
struck some thirty times, and many of her crew were killed or wounded, among 
the latter, Lieutenant-Commander Gwin, mortally. This officer refused to enter 
the shot-proof pilot-house, saying that " the Captain's place was on the quarter- 
deck." 

The other vessels handsomely supported the flag-ship. Two of the guns in the 
fort were silenced, and as the enemy's fire had slackened the boats dropped down 
and round the point out of fire. The object of the bombardment was merely to 
cover the boats that were engaged in removing the torpedoes, as the rebel works 
could only have been captured by a strong landing party. 



300 MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 

On tte 4tli of January, 1863, General McClernand having concluded to move 
up the Arkansas river and attack Arkansas Post, requested the co-operation of 
Acting near Admiral Porter. Three iron-clads, the liaron de Kalb, Lieutenant- 
Commander Walke ; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander Owen, and CincinQati, 
Lieutenant-Commanding Bache, with a number of light-draught vessels, were 
detailed to act ia couoert with the army. Acting Rear Admiral Porter, in his flag- 
ship, the Black Hawk, accompanied the expedition. Afrer a battle of two days 
Arkansas Post was surrendered to the combined forces of the army and navy, Colo- 
nel Dunnington, the commander of the fort, yielding his sword to Acting Rear 
Admiral Porter in person. Seventeen heavy guns and a large number of troops 
were captured. 

On the day after the fall of Arkansas Post, Acting Rear Admiral Porter dis- 
patched Lieutenant-Commander Walke with a force of gunboats up White river. 
On the 14th he arrived at St. Charles, and found it evacuated. On the 16th he 
reached Luvall's bluff, and meeting with no resistance, landed a party and 
took possession of two fine 8-inch guns and carriages, about two hundred stand 
of arms and accoutrements, several platform cars, etc. 

At 4.30 A. M., February 2d, the ram Queen of the West, Colonel Charles R. 
Ellet commanding, ran the Vicksburg batteries, with orders from Acting Rear 
Admiral Porter to capture or destroy all rebel transports that might be found on 
the Mississippi, between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. In passing the Vicksburg 
batteries the Queen of the West was struck twelve times, but without serious 
injury. Colonel Ellet arrived at the mouth of the Red river in safety, captur- 
ing and destroying several fine transports on his way down. After a recon- 
noissanoe of fifteen miles up the Red river, the Queen of the West returned to 
the vicinity of Vicksburg. A few days later she again steamed down the JMLssis- 
sippi and entered Red river. On the 13th of February, Lieutenant-Comman- 
der George Brown, of the iron-clad Indianola, ran the batteries of Vicksburg, 
with orders to join the Queen of the West. A few days later. Acting Rear Admiral 
Porter received intelligence of the destruction of the Queen of the West in the 
Red river, and soon after information that the Indianola had been sunk in the 
Mississippi. These vessels had destroyed large amounts of rebel property. 

In March, Acting Rear Admiral Porter, with the iron-clads Louisville, Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Owen; Cincinnati, Lieutenant-Commanding Bache; Caronde- 
let, Lieutenant-Commanding Murphy ; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commanding 
Wilson, and Pittsburg, A. V. Lieutenant Hoel, accompanied by four mortars 
and four tugs, started up Steele's bayou, which is nothing more than a ditch, 
in the hope that by cutting a way through the woods and widening the channel, 
he could find an entrance into the Yazoo river, and thus get into the rear of 
Vicksburg. He ascended Steele's bayou for a distance of thirty miles, 
until they reached Black bayou, a stream about four miles long leading into 
Deer creek. Here the crews of the vessels were put to work to clear the stream, 
pulling up trees by the roots, pushing them to one side, and cutting away the 
branches above. Notwithstanding these dilEculties, in twenty-four hours they 
succeeded in getting through these four miles, and entered Deer creek, but 
only to encounter more and greater obstacles. The expedition penetrated into 
the heart of the enemy's country before they were discovered. The agent of 
the so-called Confederate government, on hearing of their approach, destroyed 
all the cotton along the banks of the stream. 

When Acting Rear Admiral Porter arrived within a short distance of Rolling 
Fork he found the channel utterly impassable. At this point the enemy had cot 
lected a force of eight hundred men and seven pieces of artillery, which opened 
on the vessels, but were soon repulsed. 



MISSISSIPPI sQUArmoN. 301 

Acting Bear Admiral Porter tad received information that the rebels were cut- 
ting down trees to prevent the return of his vessels, and as the military force 
whict was promised did not come to his assistance he was forced to return to the 
Yazoo. The Deer creek expedition was the most novel in oonceptioQ and exe- 
cution on record. 

During the absence of Acting Rear Admiral Porter, Lieutenant-Commander 
Watson Smith, acting under orders previously received, entered Yazoo pass, with 
a detachment of gunboats, for the purpose of obtaining control of the Cold water, 
Tallahatchee, Yallabusha, and Yazoo rivers, which would have opened the way 
to the capture of Vicksburg, as it was by these rivers that the rebels received 
most of their supplies. Owing to the inability of the army to co-operate, the 
expedition was not as successful as was hoped for, although several steamers 
and five thousand bales of cotton were destroyed. 

While Acting Rear Admiral Porter was on the Deer creek expedition, Briga- 
dier-General H. W. Ellet ordered the rams Switzerland and Lancaster to attempt 
the passage of the Vicksburg batteries, with the intention of reinforcing Rear 
Admiral Farragut, who had successfully run the gauntlet of the Port Hudson 
batteries with the Hartford and Albatross. In obedience to the order of Briga- 
dier-General Ellet, the Switzerland and Lancaster attempted to pass the batteries 
at Vicksburg, but unfortunately both vessels were sunk, and many of their 
officers and crew killed and wounded. 

Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge seeing the difficulty of defending the mouths 
of the White and Arkansas rivers, while kept so far apart by a useless neck of 
land, proposed to Acting Rear Admiral Porter to cut through it. Having 
obtained permission, he cut the bend and passed through with his vessel twenty- 
four hours afterward, thus saving a distance of ten miles. 

On the 7th of April, 1863, Acting Rear Admiral Porter informed the Navy 
Department that he was preparing to pass the batteries of Vicksburg with most 
of the fleet. General Grant was marching his army below, and was endeavoring to 
turn Vicksburg and get to Jackson by a very practicable route. On the 16th 
of April the fleet, led by Acting Rear Admiral Porter, who had hoisted his flag on 
the Benton, passed the batteries. The vessels started in the following order, 
fifty yards apart: Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer; Lafayette, Captain 
Walke, with the General Price lashed on the starboard side; Louisville, Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant Wilson; Pittsburg, A. V. 
Lieutenant Hoel ; Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy; and Tuscumbia, 
Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Nine army transports were in the rear of the 
above-mentioned vessels, and the Tuscumbia was placed astern of all to see that 
the transports did not turn back. Two of the transports, when the firing 
became heavy, attempted to run up stream, but Lieutenant-Commander Shirk 
drove them back and remained behind them until the Forest Queen was dis- 
abled. He then took her in tow and placed her out of reach of the enemy's 
shot. Nearly all the vessels took in tow barges, containing each ten thousand 
bushels of coal, and all brought them safely past the batteries. 

The vessels had some narrow escapes, but were saved in most instances by the 
precautions taken to protect them. They were covered with heavy logs and 
bales of wet hay, which were found to be an excellent defence. The fleet 
passed Vicksburg without material damage, and within a half an hour after- 
ward were ready for any service. 

On the 29th of April, Acting Rear Admiral Porter, accompanied by most of the 
vessels that had passed the batteries a few days previously, commenced the 
attack on the formidable rebel works at Grand Gulf, and, after a bombardment 
of six hours, withdrew to give his men rest. At 6 o'clock, P. M., on the same 



302 MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 

day, the attack was renewed, and the transports containing a detachment of 
General Grant's command passed down under cover of the fire. 

Oq the 3d of May, Acting Rear Admiral Porter, with the Lafayette, Caron- 
delet, Mouud City and Pittsburg, proceeded up to the forts at Grand Gulf, for 
the purpose of attacking them, but found that the enemy had retreated, first 
blowing up their ammunition, spiking their large guns, and burying or taking 
away their lighter ones. Grand Gulf was the strongest place on tlie Missis- 
sippi, with the exception of Vioksburg, and its occupation greatly facilitated the 
military operations for the reduction of Vioksburg. 

On the 29th of April, a detachment of vessels of the Mississippi Squadron, 
consistiug of the De Kalb, Choctaw and Tyler, with several light draught ves- 
sels, all under cumiuaad of Lieutenant-Commander Breeze of the Black Hawk, 
made a feigued attack, in co-operation with a division of the army under Major 
General Blair, upon the batteries at Haines' Bluif, to prevent the enemy from 
sending reiaiorcements to Grand Gulf. The plan succeeded admirably. Lieu- 
tenant-Commanders Walker of the De Kalb, and Ramsay of the Choctaw, were 
commended by Lieutenant-Commander Breeze in his official report for the gal- 
lant and able manner in which they fought their vessels. 

At noon, on the 3d of May, Acting Rear Admiral Porter left Grand Gulf 
and proceeded to the mouth of Red river. He ascended as far as Alexandria, 
which he took possession of and held until the arrival of Major-General Banks. 
He then returned to Grand Gulf. On the 15th, Acting Rear Admiral Porter 
crossed over to Yazoo river, to be ready to co-operate with General Grant. On 
the 18th, at noon, firing was heard in the rear of Vioksburg, which indicated 
that General Grant was approaching the city. The cannonading was kept up 
furiously for some time, and by the aid of glasses, Acting Rear Admiral Porter 
discovered a company of artillery advancing, taking position and driving the 
rebels before them. He immediately saw that General Sherman's division 
had come in to the left of Snyder's BlufiF, and that the rebels had been cut off 
from joining the forces in the city. The De Kalb, Lieutenant-Commander 
Walker ; Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay ; Linden, Romeo, Petro and 
Forest Rose, all under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Breeze, 
were dispatched up the Yazoo river to open communication with Generals 
Grant and Sherman. This they succeeded in doing, and in three hours, Acting 
Rear Admiral Porter received letters from Generals Grant, Sherman, and 
Steele, informing him of their successes, and asking that provisions be sent up, 
which was at once done. In the meantime, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, in 
the De Kalb, pushed on to Haines' Bluff, which he found evacuated, and took 
possession of the guns, tents, and equipage of all kinds, which were found in 
good order. The crews of the gunboats burned the gun-carriages, blew up 
the magazines and destroyed the works generally. The rebels were a year con- 
structing them, and all were rendered useless in an hour. 

As soon as the capture of Haines' Bluff was reported to Acting Rear Admiral 
Porter, he sent up a force of gunboats from below Vicksburg to fire at the hill 
batteries, which fire was kept up for two or three hours. At midnight they 
moved up to the town and opened on it for an hour, and continued at intervals 
during the night to annoy the garrison. On the 19th six mortars were placed 
in position with orders to fire night and day as rapidly as they could. On the 
evening of the 21st, Acting Rear Admiral Porter received a communication from 
General Grant, stating that he intended to attack the whole of the rebel works 
at 10 A. M., the next day, and asking the Admiral to shell the batteries from 
9.30 P. M., until 10.30 A. M. The six mortars were playing rapidly on the 
town and works all night, and the Benton, Mound City, and Carondelet. went 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 303 

up and shelled the water batteries and other places where troops might bo 
rested during the night. At 7 A. M. the Mound City proceeded across the 
river and made an attack on the hill batteries opposite the canal. At 8 o'clock 
Acting Rear Admiral Porter joined her with the Benton, Tuscumbia and 
Oarondelet. 

All the vessels opened on the hill batteries and finally silenced them. The 
Benton, Mound City and Carondelet then pushed up to the water batteries, 
leaving the Tuscumbia, which vessel was out of repair, to keep the hill batte- 
ries from firing on the vessels after they had passed by. The water batteries 
opened furiously, supported by a hill battery on the starboard beam of the ves- 
sels. The iron-clads advanced to within two hundred and eighty yards, and 
returned the fire for three hours without cessation, the enemy's fire being very 
accurate and incessant. The vessels had thus been engaged with the forts an 
hour longer than General Grant had asked, and had all received severe shots under 
water, which could not be stopped up while in motion, and not knowing what 
might have delayed the movement of the army, Acting Rear Admiral Porter 
ordered the vessels to drop out of fire, which they did in a cool and l^andsome 
manner. This was the hottest fire the gunboats had ever been under ; but 
owing to the water batteries being more on a level with them than usual, the 
vessels threw in their shells so fast that the aim of the enemy was not very 
accurate. After dropping back, it was found that the enemy had taken posses- 
sion again of one of the lower hill batteries and was endeavoring to remove his 
guns, and had mounted a 12-pounder field piece to fire at General McArthur's 
troops, which had landed a short time before. The Mound City and Carondelet 
were sent to drive them off, which they did in a few minutes. 

On May 27th, Acting Reir Admiral Porter, at the urgent request of Generals 
Grant and Sherman, being led to believe that the enemy had removed his guns 
to the land side, fitted the Cincinnati for the occasion by packing her with logs 
and hay, and sent her down to shell some works which retarded the progress 
of the army. At 8.30 A. M., the Cincinnati left her anchorage and stood for 
the position assigned her. The enemy fired rapidly, and from all their guns, in- 
cluding those which were supposed to have been removed to the land side. The 
enemy fired with great accuracy, hitting the Cincinnati almost every time, the 
shots passing entirely through her protection — hay, wood and iron. Finding that 
his vessel would sink, Lieut. Bache ran her up stream and as near the right- 
hand shore asthe damaged steering apparatus would permit. About ten minutes 
before she sunk they ran close in, got out a plank and put the wounded ashore. 
The boat sunk in about three fathoms water and within range of the enemy's 
batteries. Her fire, until her magazine was drowned, was effective. 

For his conduct in this affair Lieutenant Bache was highly commended by 
Acting Rear Admiral Porter, and received a letter of thanks from the Secretary 
of the Navy. 

On the night of the 19th of June, Acting Rear Admiral Porter was notified 
by General Grant that he intended to open a general bombardment on the city 
at 4 A. M., and continue it until 10 o'clock. Commander Woodworth, of the 
General Price, received orders from Admiral Porter to move up with the Benton 
and Mound City, and attack at the time specified. Lieutenant-Commander 
Eamsay was given charge of a 100-pounder rifle, a 10-inch and a 9-inch gun, 
fitted on scows, and placed them after midnight close to the point opposite 
Vicksburg, protected by the bank. At the time appointed, all the shore batteries 
opened, as did the guns on the scows and the mortars. A little later the gunboats 
also opened and kept up a heavy fire, advancing all the time and throwing shells 
into all batteries along the hills and near the city. There was no response 



304 MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 

whatever; the batteries were all deserted. At ten o'clock the vessels and 
mortars ceased firing. 

On the 4th of July, 1863, Vicksburg surrendered to the United States forces. 

On the 7th of June, Acting Bear Admiral Porter received information that a 
rebel force of four thousand men were threatening Milliken's Bend, where a 
quantity of military stores were kept, guarded by two colored regiments and 
part of the 29th Iowa. Lieutenant-Commander Francis M. Ramsay, having 
under his command the Choctaw and Lexington, was sent to that place to pro- 
tect them. 

The troops had thrown up some extra entrenchments near the levee and pre- 
pared to receive the rebels. The enemy made his attack before daylight ; the 
colored troops met the onset manfully, and a company of the Iowa regiment stood 
at their posts until they were slaughtered to a man, killing an equal number of 
rebels. The fight was desperate, and the troops, overpowered, were compelled 
to retreat behind the bank near the water's edge, followed closely by the rebels. 
When the gunboats opened on the enemy with shell, grape and canister, they 
fled in wild confusion, not knowing the gunboats were there or expecting such 
a reception. Eighty dead rebels were left on the ground, and the entrench- 
ments were packed with the dead bodies of the blacks who had fallen at their 
posts. 

Acting Rear Admiral Porter received the following letters of congratulation 
on the fall of Vicksburg from General Sherman and the Navy Department : 

Headquaeters, Expeditionary Army, 
Black River, July ith, 1863. 

Dear Admiral : — No event of my life could have given me more personal 
pride or pleasure than to have met you to-day, on the wharf at Vicksburg — a 
Fourth of July, so eloquent in events as to need no words or stimulants to 
elevate its importance. I can appreciate the intense satisfaction you must feel 
at lying before the very monster which has defied us with such deep and 
mahgnant hate, and seeing your once dismantled fleet again a unit, and, better 
still, the chain that made an enclosed sea of a link in the great river broken 
forever. In so magnificent a result, I stop not to count who did it. It is done, 
and the day of our nation's birth is consecrated and baptised anew in a victory 
won by the united navy and army of our country. God grant that the harmony 
and mutual respect that exists between our respective commanders, and shared 
by all the true men of the joint service may continue forever, and serve to 
elevate our national character, threatened with shipwreck. Thus I muse as I 
sit in my solitary camp out in the wood, far from the point for which we have 
jointly striven so long and well, and though personal curiosity would tempt me 
to go and see the frowning batteries and sunken pits that have defied us so long,' 
and sent to their silent graves so many of our early comrades in the enterprise, 
I feel that other tasks lie before me, and time must not be lost. Without cast- 
ing anchor, and despite the heat and the dust, and the drought, I must again 
into the bowels of the land to make the conquest of Vicksburg fulfill all the 
conditions it should in the progress of this war. 

Whether success attend my efforts or not, I know that Admiral Porter will 
ever accord me the exhibition of a pure and unselfish zeal in the service of our 
country. 

It does seem to me that Port Hudson, without facilities for supplies or interior 
communication, must soon follow the fate of Vicksburg and leave the river free; 
and to you remains the task of preventing any more Vicksburgs or Port Hudsons 
on the bank of the great inland sea. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 305 

Though farther apart, the navy and army will still act in concert, and I 
assure you I shall never reach the banks of the river or see a gunboat but I will 
think of Admiral Porter, Captain Breeze, and the many elegant and accom- 
plished gentlemen it has been my great fortune to meet on armed or unarmed 
decks of the Mississippi Squadron. Congratulating' you and the officers 
of your command at the great result in which you have borne so conspicuous a 
part, I remain, as ever, your friend and servant, 

W. T. SHEEMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral D. D. Porter, 

(Jommanding Fleet. 



Navt Department, July IZth, 1863. 

Sir : — Tour dispatch of the 4th instant, announcing the surrender of Vicks- 
burg on the anniversary of the great historic day in our national annals, has 
been received. The fall of that place insures a severance of the rebel territory, 
and must give to the country the speedy uninterrupted navigation of the rivers 
which water and furnish the ocean outlet to the great central valley of the 
Union. For the past year the key to the Mississippi has been Vicksburg, and 
so satisfied of this was the rebel chief who provisioned the rebellion and first 
gave orders to open the fires of civil strife, that he staked his cause upon its 
retention. By the herculean efibrts of the army under the admirable leadership 
of General Grant, and the persistent and powerful co-operation of the navy 
cominanded by yourself, this great result, under the providence of Almighty 
God, has been achieved. A slave empire, divided by this river into equal 
parts, with liberty in possession of its banks and freedom upon its waters, cannot 
exist. The work of rescuing and setting free this noble artery, whose unre- 
stricted vital current is essential to our nationality, commenced with such ability 
by the veteran Farragut and the lamented Foote, and continued by Davis, is 
near its consummation. You have only to proceed onward and meet that veteran 
chief whose first act was to dash through the gates by which the rebels assumed 
to bar the entrance to the Mississippi, whose free communication to and above 
New Orleans he has ever since proudly maintained. 

When the squadrons of the upper and lower Mississippi shall combine, and 
the noble river be again free to a united people, the nation will feel its integrity 
restored, and the names of the heroic champions who signalized themselves in 
this invaluable service will be cherished and honored. Present and future mil- 
lions on the shores of those magnificent rivers, which patriotism and valor shall 
have emancipated, will remember with unceasing gratitude the naval heroes who 
so well performed their part in these eventful times. 

To yourself, your officers, and brave and gallant sailors, who have been so 
fertile in resources, so persistent and enduring through many months of trial 
and hardship, and so daring under all circumstances, I tender, in the name of 
the President, the thanks and congratulations of the whole country on the fall 
of Vicksburg. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear Admiral David D. Porter, 

Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Vicksburg, Miss. 
20 V 



306 MISSISSIPPI SQUADEON. 

Acting Rear Admiral Porter was commissioned as Rear Admiral, to date 
from July 4th, 1863; and General Grant at the same time commissioned as 
Major-General of the United States Army. , 

On the 4th of July the port of Helena, Arkansas, was attacked by a force of 
eighteen thousand rebels. General Prentice, the commander, defended the place 
with a skill and daring not excelled in the war, but his little furce of thirty- 
five hundred men were fast being overpowered by the enemy, vchen the gun- 
boat Tyler, Lieutenant-Commander J. M. Pritchett, took position and opened 
her batteries on the enemy and changed the fortunes of the day. 

Within a few days after the fall of Vicksburg, Rear Admiral Porter de- 
spatched the Baron de Kalb, New National, Kenwood and Signal, under com- 
mand of Lieutenant-Commander John G. Walker, up the Yazoo river, for the 
purpose of driving out from Yazoo city the command of rebel General Johnson, 
who were fortifying that place with heavy guns, intending to make it a depot 
of military supplies for the rebel army. The gunboats were accompanied by a 
force of troops numbering five thousand, under Major-General Prank J. Herron. 
Pushing up to the city, the Baron de Kalb engaged the batteries, which were 
all prepared to receive her, and after ascertaining their strength dropped back 
to notify General Herron, who immediately landed his men, and the army and 
navy made a combined attack on the enemy's works. The rebels set fire to 
four of their finest steamers and fled, leaving everything in possession of the 
United States forces. The army pursued the enemy, captured a large number 
of men, six heavy guns, and all their munitions of war; one vessel, formerly a 
gunboat, fell into the hands of the navy. Unfortunately, while the Baron de Kalb 
was moving along she ran foul of a torpedo, which exploded and sunk her. Many 
of the crew were bruised by the concussion, which was severe, but no lives 
were lost. The officers and men lost everything. About the middle of July, 
Rear Admiral Porter dispatched a force of gunboats, under Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Selfridge, into Red river. Many fine steamers that had been used in 
transporting rebel troops and supplies were captured. 

While the main portion of the squadron, under the personal supervision of 
Acting Rear Admiral Porter, was operating against Vicksburg, the gunboats 
stationed on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers had carried on the war most 
actively. There had been incessant skirmishing between the guerrillas and 
gunboats in which the enemy were defeated in every instance. Had it not 
been for the activity and energy displayed by Captain Pennock, Fleet Cap- 
tain and Commandant of the Naval Station at Cairo, and Lieutenant-Commanders 
Phelps and Switch, the Division Commanders on the Cumberland and Tennessee 
rivers, the army under General Rosecrans would have been left without pro- 
visions. 

In July, the rebel General John Morgan crossed from Kentucky into Ohio, 
and finding himself hotly pursued by the United States troops under General 
Judah, endeayored to recross the Ohio Mver. This, Lieutenant-Commander 
Fitch determined, if possible, to prevent, and pursued him over a distance of 
five hundred miles, finally intercepting him at Buflington Island, where he 
attempted to cross. Morgan and nearly all his band were captured by the 
combined forces under General Judah and Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. 

In November, as soon as Rear Admiral Porter heard of General Sherman's 
moye from Memphis for Corinth, he commenced assembling the most suitable 
vessels at the mouth of the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers. The water was 
very low in the Ohio,_and Lieutenant-Commander Le Roy Fitch was obliged to 
force his vessels, drawing thirty inches, over bars where there were only twenty- 
six inches of water. He succeeded in getting over in time to accompany any 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 307 

transports that might be ready ; and, despite the guerillas on the hanks, he con- 
voyed through safely all the steamers and stores so much needed by the army. 
A fortunate rise of water enabled the gunboats under Lieutenant-Commander 
Phelps to ascend the Tennessee river as far as Eastport, and a few hours after 
their arrival General Sherman arrived at luka. With tbe help of the barges 
the troops were all ferried over in an incredibly short time by the gunboats, and 
General Sherman was thus enabled to bring his formidable corps into action in 
the battles before Chatoanooga. Later, the transports were convoyed up with 
provisions, and the gunboats held Eastport, threatening any party that might 
attempt to cut the communication, until General Grant telegraphed that East- 
port should be evacuated and the troops convoyed to Columbus, Kentucky. The 
transports with the troops on board reached Columbus in safety, having been 
convoyed to their destination by a force of gunboats. 

In the early part of February, 1864, Lieutenant-Commander Owen was sent 
to co-operate with General Sherman, who was marching on Meridian, and to 
confuse the enemy with regard to movements on foot. The expedition accom- 
plished all that was expected of it, and had the effect of driving the guerillas 
from the Mississippi, as they were apprehensive of being cut off from the 
interior. 

On the 1st of March, Kear Admiral Porter sent a force of gunboats up the 
Black and Washita rivers, under command of Lieutenant-Commander ¥. W. 
Kamsay. The expedition was entirely successful. The rebels, about 2,000 
strong, under General Polignac, were driven from point to point, some extensive 
works captured and destroyed, and three heavy 32-puunders brought away. 

On the 7th of March, Rear Admiral Porter had assembled at the mouth of 
Red river a formidable fleet of iron-clads composed of the following vessels : 
Essex, Commander Robert Townsend; Eastport, Commander S. L. Phelps; 
Benton, Lieutenant-Commander James A. Gr^er ; Lafayette, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander J. P. Foster; Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay; Louisville, 
Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owens; Carondelet, Lieutenant-Commander J. C. 
Mitchell; Osage, Lieutenant-Commander T. 0. Selfridge; Oucbita, Lieutenant- 
Commander Byron Wilson; Fort Hindman, A. V. Lieutenant John Pierce; 
Pittsburg, A. V. Lieutenant W. R. Hoel ; Ozark, A. V. Lieutenant George W. 
Browne ; Chilicothe, A. V. Lieutenant J. P. Couthouy ; Mound City, A. V. 
Lieutenant A. R. Langthorne ; Neosho, A. V. Lieutenant Samuel H. Howard ; 
and a force of light draught vessels consisting of Black Hawk, Lieutenant- 
Commander K. R. Breeze ; Lexington, Lieutenant George M. Bache ; Cricket, 
Acting Master H. H. Gorringe; Gazelle, Acting Master Charles Thatcher. The 
fleet were joined at the mouth of Red river by a portion of General Sherman's 
forces in transports, under the command of General A. J. Smith. The joint 
forces moved up the river on the 10th of March to form a junction with Major- 
General Banks at Alexandria. In their progress some of the vessels branched 
off into the Atohafalaya, while the main portion continued up Red river. The 
rebels were driven in turn from Simmsport and Fort De Rusy, the latter being 
again captured with its guns and munitions of war and a few prisoners. Some 
of the fleetest vessels were dispatched to Alexandria with the hope of cutting 
off the rebels in their retreat, but without success. The place was occupied by 
the combined forces, and about the 1st of April both army and navy commenced 
to move up the river toward Shrevesport. A part only of the naval . force 
could proceed further up the river than Alexandria, and it was with difficulty 
that they reached that point. But the assistance of the gunboats was so essential 
to success that some risks had to be taken, and extraordinary exertions were 
made to pass the vessels over the falls, so as to secure the required co-opera» 



308 MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 

tion. Main force had to be used to haul the gunboats. Grand Ecore was 
reached without accident and occupied without opposition. There were at this 
time indications of the flsual rise of the season in the river, and everything 
promised success. Twenty-three heavy guns had been captured from the enemy 
since their entrance into the river. 

Springfield landing was designated as the point for the next juncture of the 
co-operating forces, and it was reached at the appointed time, three days after 
leaving Grand Ecore, by six gunboats and twenty heavy transports. Here they 
learned that the-army under General Banks had met a reverse, and was falling 
back to Pleasant Hill, some distance below. Rear Admiral Porter was therefore 
compelled to turn back, with the full knowledge that in retracing his steps he 
would be interrupted at every assailable point. The rebels, flushed with their 
success against the army, availed themselves of every opportunity which offered 
for harrassing the gunboats and transports. The cavalry and artillery taking 
advantage of the winding stream, moved rapidly from point to point, attacking 
on every available occasion. But the gunboats successfully fought their way, 
and from time to time repelled their assailants with terrible slaughter. 
! On the 14th of April, Rear Admiral Porter got back to Grand Ecore, where 
°he found the vessels which he had left at that point, still detained above the 
bar. The river, instead of rising as usual at this season, had fallen during his 
absence. The army was preparing to move back upon Alexandria ; the water 
having so receded, there was little hope of getting the vessels out, and destruc- 
tion apparently awaited the best portion of the squadron. But, in the words of 
the admiral, " Providence provided a man for the occasion." Lieutenant-Colonel 
Joseph Bailey, acting engineer of the 19th army corps, an intelligent and 
efficient officer, devised a plan for the construction of a series of dams across 
the rooks at the falls ; thus, by artificial means, supplying that which nature 
withheld — a sufficient depth of water for the passage of the vessels. 

Extraordinary as was the project, and received with increduUty, the mind 
that conceived it was enabled to carry it into successful operation. Men were 
set to work ; wood-cutters collected ; quarries opened ; and after some weeks, 
the undertaking was accomplished. The dams were built ; the vessels passed 
safely over the falls, to the delight of the assembled army and navy, who had 
mutually participated in this work, and on the 16th of May, Rear Admiral 
Porter had the satisfaction of announcing that the fleet was relieved from 
danger. 

There is probably, in naval history, no other instance of such peril and diffi- 
culty so successfully and skillfully surmounted. Congress appropriately acknow- 
ledged the services of Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, on this occasion, and they 
were still further recognized by his promotion. 

A division of the Red river expedition that was unable to get above the falls, 
was sent, under command of Lieutenant-Commander James P. Foster, up the 
Washita river as far as Monroe. This force captured 3,000 bales of confederate 
cotton,^ brought out 800 negroes, and destroyed much rebel property. 

While above the falls, Rear Admiral Porter received inteHigence of the 
capture pf Port Pillow; he dispatched a force of iron-clads to that point to 
prevent its permanent occupation by the rebels, and to keep the river open to 
commerce. On the 25th of March, the rebels made an attack upon Paducah, 
and demanded its immediate surrender, saying they would give no quarter, if 
refused. The gunboats Peosta, Paw Paw and Fort Hindman, at once opened fire 
upon the rebels, and with such effect as to drive them off with great loss. 

Captain Pennock, Naval Commandant at Cairo, upon receiving intelligence of 
the attack upon Paducah, at once sent up reinforcements of gunboats to the 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 309 

assistance of those already there, and the same officer saved Columbus, Kentucky, 
and recovered Fort Pillow, thus preventing a blockade of the river, by his zeal 
and personal exertions in hastening reinforcements to those points. 

The attacks upon Port Pillow, Columbus and Paducah, were made at the time 
when the greater portion of the Mississippi Squadron was operating on the Eed 
river and its tributaries. Anticipating that the enemy would avail themselves of 
the absence of his more formidable vessels, to attack certain points within 
the limits of the upper portion of the squadron, Rear Admiral Porter had 
intrusted to Fleet Captain Pennock the entire control of the vessels stationed on 
the Ohio, Tennessee, and Cumberland rivers, anion the Mississippi as far down 
as Memphis, thus enabling him to act promptly when the time arrived. In 
his detailed report of the naval operations before Vicksburg, Rear Admiral 
Porter acknowledged, in the handsomest terms, his indebtedness to Fleet Cap- 
tain Pennock, who was also Commandant of the Naval Station at Cairo, for the 
promptness with which he kept the squadron supplied with all that was required 
or could be procured. 

Rear Admiral Porter having been for nearly two years on arduous and 
exhausting duty on the Mississippi, received leave to return Bast in the 
summer, and was subsequently detached in order to take command of the North 
Atlantic Squadron. Captain A. W. Pennock, senior officer on the station, was 
left in charge. On the 1st of November Acting Rear Admiral S. P. Lee, 
assumed command of the Mississippi Squadron, and entered on the discharge 
of his duties. 

In November, 1864, the light draught vessels, Tawah, Key West, and Elfin, 
were burned in the Tennessee river near Johnsonville. After a severe engage- 
ment with the rebel batteries, of several hours duration, A. V. Lieutenant E. 
M. King, the senior officer present, finding it impossible to save the vessels, 
ordered them to be fired. The officers and crew escaped. Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Shirk, the Division Commander, took prompt measures to regain the 
control of the Tennessee river, and in a few days was enabled to report the 
capture of several transports, laden with rebel troops, by the vessels of his com- 
mand ; but he found it impossible with the tin-clad gunboats under his con- 
trol at that time to force them from their fortified position at Johnsonville. 

On the 4th of November, the rebel General Hood was driven from Decatur, 
Alabama, in which afi'air the gunboat General Thomas took a prominent part, 
receiving the acknowledgments of Major-General Thomas for her efficient ser- 
vices. On the 3d of December, Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, commanding the 
10th district of the Mississippi Squadron, defeated and drove from the Tennessee 
river the left wing of Hood's army under General Beauford, with heavy loss to 
the rebels, including several prominent officers, and recaptured two transports 
from the enemy. 

In the early part of December an expedition was sent' from Vicksburg by 
Major-General Davis, to destroy the enemy's railroad communications in Missis- 
sippi. The gunboats Vindicator, A. V. Lieutenant Gorringe, and Prairie Bird, 
Acting Master Burns, co-operated with the army. The expedition proved a 
complete success. The combined forces destroyed the railroad bridge over the Big 
Black river, tore up some thirty miles of the track, and captured a considerable 
amount of the enemy's stores. Major-General Dana addressed very compli- 
mentary letters to A. V. Gorringe and Acting Master Burns, thanking them 
for their energetic and intelligent co-operation. 

Under date of December 27th, 1864, Acting Rear Admiral Lee, writing from 
Chickasaw, Alabama, reported to the Navy Department, that he had destroyed 
a new fort at that point, and all the enemy's visible means of crossing the 



810 WEST INDIA SQUADEON. 

Tennessee below Florence, and had that day blown up the caissons and destroyed 
two field-pieces. He reported Hood's army broken up and crossing the river 
above Little Muscle Shoals six miles above Florence. The river was then 
falling rapidly, which made it impracticable to reach the crossing which the 
enemy were then using. Finding it impossible to intercept the enemy at Little 
Muscle Shoals, Acting Rear Admiral Lee returned down the river in time to 
convoy General A. T. Smith's command of 12,000 men, with six batteries, to 
Eastport, Mississippi. Army transportation being scarce, many of the troops 
were taken to Eastport in the gunboats. 

Early in January, 1865, Acting Rear Admiral Lee was enabled to report to 
the Navy Department that Hood's army was completely demoralized, and were 
retreating rapidly before the victorious force of General Thomas. 

Under date of December 30th, Major-General Thomas addressed a compli- 
mentary letter to Acting Rear Admiral Lee, in which h^ says : 

* * * ii Your co-operation on the Tennessee river has contributed 
largely to the demoralization of Hood's army. * * * it gives 
me great pleasure to tender to you, your officers and men, my hearty thanks for 
your cordial co-operation during ihe operations of the past thirty days." 

Acting Rear Admiral Lee received the thanks of Congress for his services on 
the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. 

After the engagement at Nashville, General Steedman, of General Thomas' 
command was sent to retake Decatur. The gunboats under command of Lieu- 
tenant Moreau Forrest co-operated, and the place, with the artillery there, was 
captured. On the 23d of April, 1865, the rebel ram Webb, carrying two or 
three guns, two hundred and seventeen bales of cotton and fifty barrels of rosin 
or turpentine, ran out of Red river, and without doing any damage on the way, 
other than cutting down telegraph wires, continued down the river until inter- 
cepted by the sloop of war Richmond, the next afternoon, twenty-five miles 
below New Orleans, where she was run ashore and destroyed by those on board. 

In the month of June, 1865, the rebel naval forces in Red river surrendered 
to Lieutenant-Commander Fitzhugh of the steamer Ouchita. 

After the surrender of the rebel naval forces on Red river, the Mississippi 
Squadron, comprising at one time over one hundred steamers, was gradually 
reduced, and on the 14th of August wholly discontinued. Acting Rear Admi- 
ral Lee was relieved, and Commodore Livingston, then Naval Commander at 
Cairo, was intrusted with the duty of disposing of the vessels, and closing up 
the affairs of the squadron. 



WEST INDIA SQUADRON. 



In 1862, a forceof vessels, selected for their speed and general efficiency, 
was fitted out, organized as a squadron, placed under the command of Acting Rear 
Admiral Wilkes, and sent to the West Indies. The objects for which this squad- 
ron was created, were to break up blockade running to and from the West India 
Islands; if possible, to capture the piratical steamers there preying upon the 
commerce of the United States, and to afford safe convoy to the California, 
steamers over the most exposed portions of their route. 



POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 311 

Acting Rear Admiral Wilkes retained command of this squadron until 1863, 
when he was relieved by Acting Rear Admiral James L. Lardner, who con- 
tinued in commaQd until the squadron, as an organization, was discontinued in 
the latter part of 1803. 

The West India Squadron fulfilled the objects for which it was organized, 
capturing many valuable prizes, and affording safe convoy to steamers sailing 
under the United States flag. 



THE POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 

In the early part of 1861, it became necessary to place a flotilla on the lower 
Potomac. A variety of circumstances combined to render this one of the most 
arduous, duties on the whole insurgent frontier, and it was clearly foreseen that 
without the active co-operation of the army, it would be impossible to prevent 
the navigation of the river from being obstructed by the batteries on the Vir- 
ginia side. For several months, however, the navy succeeded more effectually 
than could have been expected in keeping the river open for commercial pur- 
poses, and restricting, to a great extent, communication between the opposite 
shores. In the heroic discharge of his duty, Commander J. H. Ward, first 
commander of the flotilla, lost his life. Commander Ward was killed in an 
action with a rebel battery, at Matthias Point, on the 27th of June, 1861. He 
was the first naval officer killed during the rebellion. 

The navy continued to capture every rebel vessel that showed itself on the 
Potomac, and to give security and protection to the commerce of loyal citizens 
until the close of October, when the insurgents erected batteries at various 
points on the Virginia shore, thereby rendering passage on the river dangerous. 

Captain Thomas T. Craven succeeded Commander Ward in the command of 
the Potomac flotilla, and remained on that service until relieved by Lieutenant 
R. H. Wyman, in the fall of 1861. 

Lieutenant Wyman remained in command on the Potomac, constantly en- 
gaged in active operations against ,the enemy until early in 1862, when Com- 
modore A. H. Harwood assumed the command. 

In the years 1863 and '63, the vessels of the Potomac flotilla found constant 
employment in keeping a close watch and guard to intercept and prevent, as far 
as possible, communication with the rebels, and many captures were made. To 
provide against possible contingencies at the time of the invasion of Maryland 
and Pennsylvania, which terminated in the battle of G-ettysburg, vessels were 
stationed at what were deemed available points along the upper waters of the 
Chesapeake, to co-operate with the military authorities. A gunboat was sent 
up the Susquehanna to Havre-de-Grrace, another up the Grunpowder, a third up 
the Buckwater, while one was also posted at Annapolis, and another at Wil- 
mington. 

During the years 1864-5, the Potomac flotilla was under the command of Com- 
mander Foxhall A. Parker. Upon the flotilla devolved the duty of constantly 
patroling the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers; and at all times and on all 
occasions, the flotilla gave its active and willing co-operation to the military 
movements. 

While the army was in the vicinity of Fredericksburg, in the spring and 
summer of 1864, the services of the smaller steamers on the Rappahannock 
were efficient and invaluable. 



312 VESSELS ON SPECIAL SERVICE. 

Commander Parker continued in command of the flotilla until it waa dis- 
banded, on the Slat of July, 1865. 



VESSELS ON SPECIAL SEKVICE. 

From the beginning to the end of the rebellion a number of the most efficient 
vessels at the disposal of the Navy Department were kept cruising in the dif- 
fereat quarters of the world in search of the piratical vessels which were preying 
upon the commerce of the United States. 

On the 8th of November, 1861, Captain Charles "Wilkes, of the steam-sloop 
San Jacinto, while cruising in the West Indies for the rebel privateer Sumpter, 
received information that James M. Mason and John Slidell, disloyal citizens 
and leading conspirators, with their suite, were to embark in the Trent on 
their way to Europe to promote the cause of the insurgents. Cruising in the 
Bahama channel he intercepted the Trent and took from her the rebel ambas- 
sadors and Messrs. Eustis and McParland, their secretaries. Finding the 
families of Messrs. Slidell and Eustis on board, Captain Wilkes tendered them 
the offer of his cabin for their accommodation to accompany their husbands. 
This they declined, however, and proceeded in the Trent. The San Jacinto 
having been ordered to report for service at Charlestown, the prisoners were 
retained on board and conveyed to Fort Warren, where they were committed to 
the custody of Colonel Dimmiok, in command of that fortress. 

On Sunday, June 19th, 1864, the United States steam-sloop Kearsarge, Cap- 
tain John A. Winslow commanding, after an engagement of an hour and a 
half, sunk the rebel privateer Alabama off the port of Cherbourg, France. 

The Kearsarge and Alabama were of nearly the same tonnage, and there was 
but a trifling difference in the weight of metal thrown by the respective vessels 
at a broadside. 

Full particulars of this engagement may be found in the record of Commo- 
dore John A. Winslow, pages 28 and 29. 

On the 7th of October, 1864, the United States sloop Wachusett, Commander 
Napoleon Collins, captured the rebel privateer Florida in the bay of San Sal- 
vador, Brazil. 

Information reached the Department in May, 1865, that the iron-clad ram 
Stonewall, a formidable vessel, built in France, had arrived at Havana. This 
vessel had been conditionally purchased by Denmark, but not proving satisfac- 
tory to that government, she was sold to the rebels. Acting Bear Admiral 
G-odon, who had received orders to command on the Brazil Station, and was on 
the point of sailing, was directed to proceed immediately with a force hastily 
collected, and placed under his command, in search of the Stonewall, which, 
it was understood, designed to appear on the United States coast. He sailed 
from Hampton Roads on the 16th of May, and arrived off Havana on the 28th. 
Shortly after his arrival, the Stonewall was delivered over to the Spanish 
authorities by her commander, and Bear Admiral Godon was advised that Spain 
would place her at the disposal of the United States. 



A COMPLETE LTST OF THE OFFICERS AND VESSELS 

ENGAGED IN THE MOST IMPORTANT NAVAL BATTLES 
OP THE REBELLION OJF 1861-5. 



NOETH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



CAPTURE OF HATTERAS INLET, AUGUST 28, 1861. 



STEAM-rEIOATB MINKESOTA, (Flag-ship.) 

Flag-officer, Silas H. StriDgliam. 

Captain, G. J. Van Brunt. 

Commander, A. Ludlow Case, (Fleet Cap- 
tain.) 

Lieutenants, John C. Howell, J. P. Foster, 
E. C. Grafton, William Gibson, Joliu 
Waiters, and C. L. Franklin. 

Fleet Surgeon, Thomas Dillard. 

Assistant Surgeons, S. C. Jones and J. H. 
Gotwald. 

Paymaster, Kobert Pettit. 

Chaplain, George Jones. 

Chief Engineer, C. H. Loring. 

Flag-officer's Secretary, G. B. Halsted. 

Acting Masters, John MoDiarmid, C. S. 
Shoemaker, Robert Patterson, John F. 
Ferguson, and George M. Rice. 

First Assistant Engineer, W. W. Dungan. 

Second Assistant Engineer, G. S. Bright. 

Third Assistant Engineers, G. W. Sensner, 
R. S. Talbot, E. J. Whittaker, Alfred 
Colin, and Lewis A. Haverly. 

Midshipman, R. S. McCook. 

Master's Mates, W. B. Gushing, C. F. Lor- 
ing, C. A. Blanchard, and F. W. Halsted. 

Flag-officer's Clerk, E. W. Hale. 

Pilot, Thomas R. Fisher. 

STBAM-FRIOATE WABASH. 

Captain, Samuel Mercer. 

Lieutenants, Thomas G. Corbin, S. B. Luce, 

E. 0. Matthews, John H. Upsher, John 

Irwin, and John S. Barnes. 
Surgeon, Edward Gilchrist. 
Assistant Surgeon, James G. Magee. 
Paymaster, John S. Gulick. 
Chaplain, George W. Dorrauce. 



Chief Engineer, J. W. King. 

Captain, I. T. Doughty, Marine Corps. 

Lieutenant, W. N. Maull, Marine Corps. 

Acting Masters, John W. Bentley, T. Stiles, 
and J. E. Rockwell. 

Midshipmen, J. P. Robertson, J. H. Ro- 
land, and R. H. Lamson. 

Second Assistant Engineers, Thomas A. 
Stephens, Robert McClery, H. H. Ma- 
lony, H. Missimer, William C. William- 
son, Philip R. Voorhes, and Francis J. 
Lovering. 

Captain's Clerk, J. H. Bulkley. 

Gunner, Thomas Stewart. 

Carpenter, Charles Boardman. 

Boatswain, Jasper Coughlin. 

STEAM-SLOOP PAWNEE. 

Commander, S. C. Rowan. 

Lieutenants, James G. Maxwell, T. H. East- 
man, and H. M. Blue. 

Surgeon, F. M. Gunnell. 

Paymaster, Charles W. Abbott. 

Acting Master, A. S. Snell. 

Chief Engineer, W. H. Rutherford. 

Third Assistant Engineers, David Hardee, 
Joseph Trilley, Newton Champion, Alfred 
Adamson, and H. D Sellman. 

Gunner, William Bernice. 

Acting Boatswain, J. H. PoUey. 

STEAMER MOHTIOELLO. 

Commander, John P. Gillis. 
Lieutenant, Daniel L. Braine. 
Assistant Surgeon, Frederick E. Potter. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, George D. E. 
Barton. 

313 



314 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



Acting Masters, Edwin T. Jayer and John 
F. Winchester. 

Aciing Chief Engineer, George M. Waite. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Jonathan 
ThomaB. 

Third Assistant Engineer, Columbus L. 
Griffen. 

Master's Mates, Lewis A. Brown and Rich- 
mond Hustace. 

KBVENUE CUTTEB HARRIET LANE. 

Captain, John Faunce. 

lieutenants, D. C. Constable, D. D. Tomp- 
kins, H. 0. Porter, F. M. Dungan, H. J. 
Gambrill, and J. H. Thatcher. 



Acting AsBistant Surgeon, N. L. Campbell. 
Chief Engineer, James R. Dry burgh. 
First Assistant Engineer, Charles G. Dale. 
Pilot, William A. Booth. 

CHAETEEED STBAMEE ADELAIDE. 

Commander, Henry S. Stellwagen, U. S. N. 

CHAETERED STEAMER GEOEGE PEABODT. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, R. B. Lowry, U. 

S. N. 

TUO PANNT. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Pierce Crosby, U. 

S.N. 



CAPTURE OF ROANOKE ISLAND, FEBRUARY 8, 1862. 



STEAMER VALLEY CITY. 

Flag-ofiacer, L. M. Goldsborough. 
Lieutenant-Commanding, J. C. Chaplin. 
Master, John R. Grace. 
Master's Mate, John Aspinwall. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, John Kimmer. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Thomas 

Punblett and Wesley Woodware. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Benjamin 

Page. 
Master's Mates, Cornelius Washburne, 

John Hill, and William Betts. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Strong 

Coulkler. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, Walter 

Bradley. 

STEAMER STAES AND STRIPES. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Reed Werden. 

Lieutenant, R. S. McCook. 

Acting Masters, George Ashbury, S. L. 

Olapp, L. W. Hill, and Thomas Smith. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, John J. Pratt. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, ]3enjamin Blar- 

shall. 
First Assistant Engineer, John Eriggs. 
Third Assistant Engineers, T. D. Coffee, 

William D. Forbes, and John Burns. 
Master's Mates, H. B. Conklin, S. C. Foot, 

and Charles Wall. 
Acting Gunner, Daniel Dunsmore. 
Pilot, A. 0. Farron. 

STEAMER LOUISIANA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, A. Murray. 
Lieutenant, A. Hopkins. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, H. K. Tur- 
ner. 



Acting Master, Edward Hooker. 

Assistant Paymaster, W. W. Williams. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Michael Brad- 
ley. 

Second Assistant Engineer, John S. Lay. 

Third Assistant Engineers, John Huxley 
and Daniel McCariney 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, T. J. Mc- 
Daniels. 

Acting Master's Mates, Edwin McKeever 
and George F. Halles. 

STEAMER HBTZEL. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, H. K. Daven- 
port. 

Acting Masters, C. H. Daniels and J. B. 
Hammond. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, N. L. Campbell. 

Acting Master's Mate, Benjamin Walker. 

Second Assistant Engineer, J. B. Dick. 

Third Assistant Engineers, John H. Pad- 
gett and William Brown. 

STEAMEE CNDEEWEITER. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, William' N. Jef- 

fers. 
Acting Master's Mates, Walter B. Griffith, 

William B. Engell, and P. Ward. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, John 

Cohill. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, John 

Whittaker. 

STEAMER DELAWARE. 

Commander, S. C. Rowan, Commanding 

Flotilla, 
Lieutenant-Commanding, S. P. Quaoken- 

bush. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



315 



Acting Master and Executive Officer, L. B. 
Chase. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, F. R. Curtis. 

Acting Surgeon, Lorenzo Traver. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, in 
charge, John D. Williamson. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, A. Dun- 
bar, J. Davis, and T. J. Brown. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. H. Kerens, J. H. 
Ba mond, and J. B. Hammond. 

BTEAMEB COMMODOBE FERRT. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Charles W. Flusser. 

Acting Master, F. Thomas. 

Second Assistant Engineer, John W. Cross. 

Third Assistant Engineers, John L. Bowers 
and George W. Richards. 

Master's Mates, John Lynch, Henry C.Web- 
ster, Henry Smith, and Reuben Dallery. 

STEAMER COMMODORE BARNEY. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, R. S. Renshaw. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, James Kinuier. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Benjamin 

Page. 
Acting Ensigns, William Betts, Cornelius 

Washburn, and Brainard P. Trask. 
Acting Master's Mates, David Fader and 

John Aspinwall, Jr. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Thomas 

Pemblett. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Lewis 

M KensU and Hiram Warner. 

STEAMER ETNCHBACE. 

Acting Lieutenant-Commanding, Edmund R. 

Colhoun. 
Acting Master, Richard Pasquell and James 

H. Hardesty. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Robert 

E. Brown. • 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, John 

Wall and Henry Armstrong. 
Acting Master's Mates, Charles Weaver, 

William Weaver, and Robert P. Bass. 
Pilot, J. C. Sohellenger. 

STEAMER SOUTHEIELD. 

Acting Yolunteer Lieutenant-Commanding, 

Charles F. W. Behm. 
Acting Master, Richard Vevers. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. H. D. Noyes. 
Second Assistant Engineer, G. E. Ashby. 
Third Assistant Engineers, B. Gildersleeve 

and James Kennedy. 
Master's Mates, W. F. Pratt, JohnH. Shone, 

and James Such, 

STEAMER MORSE. 

Acting Master Commanding, Peter Hayes. 



Master's Mates, Charles E. Rich, George W. 

Caswell, and Joseph Arant. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Thomas 

Devine. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, .Tames 

Lyons and W. H. Busohe. 

STEAMEB WHITEHEAD. 

Acting Master Commanding, Charles A. 

French. 
Second Assistant Engineer, Moses Peterson. 
Third Assistant Engineer, M. W. Baker. 
Acting Master's Mates, Wm. F. Gragg and 

Thomas E. Quarle. 
Pilot, J. Foster. 

STEAMER LOOKWOOD. 

Acting Master Commanding, G. W. Graves. 
Acting Master's Mate, A. H. Flinks. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers, Joseph 
T. Newton and William W. Whiting. 

STEAMER HENKT BRINKEB. 

Acting Master Commanding, J. E. Giddings. 
Master's Mate, P. W. Sanbftur. 
Acting Master's Mate, W. B. Miles. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, J. W. 

Kelsey. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, W. H. 

Tate and R. Ross. 

STEAMER J. N. SEYMOUR. 

Acting Master Commanding, Francis S. 

Wells. 
Acting Master's Mates, Charles F. Whall 

and Charles M. Howard. 
Second Assistant Engineer, Stephen Malors. 
Third Assistant Engineer, Newton Eggles- 

ton. 

STEAMER CERES. 

Acting Master, John McDiarmid. 
Master's Mates, R. M. Coleman and G. B. 

Thompson. 
Second Assistant Engineer, Hugh Rofferty. 
Third Assistant Engineer, J. S. Fary. 

STEAMER GENERAL P0TNAM. 

Acting Master Commanding, William S. 

Hotchkiss. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, James 

Osborne. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, John 

Henry. 
Acting Master's Mates, Henry C. Hawkins 

and Austin P. Kirkham. 

STEAMER SHAWSHEEN. 

Acting Master Commanding, Thomas J. 
Woodward. 



316 



NOETH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



Second Assistant Engineer, Hiram Lanford. 11 Acting Master's Mates, G. W. Barrett and 
Third Assistant Engineers, Kichard Ander- E. F. Henderson, 
son and M. Smith. 



CAPTURE OF FOKT FISHER, JANUARY, 15, 1865. 



MALVEKN, (4th rate,) Flag-ship. 

Bear Admiral David D. Porter, command- 
ing squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breeze, 
Fleet Captain. 

Lieutenant Commander, H. A. Adams, Jr., 
Ordnance Officer. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, B. H. Porter. 

Lieutenants, S. W. Preston, (Flag,) M. W. 
Sanders, Signal Officer, and S. W. Terry, 
Detailing Officer. 

Fleet Paymaster, H. M. Hieskell. 

Fleet Engineer, Theodore Zeller. 

Bear Admiral's Secretary, C. P. Porter. 

Assistant Surgeon, J. S. Ramsay. 

Assistant Paymaster, C. F. Guild (special 
duty.) 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, A. B, Poor. 

Acting Masters, J. H. Hamilton and Jay 
Price. 

Acting Ensigns, J. M. Alden, H. Woodruff, 
R. Bates, J. W. Grattan, and F. W. Gor- 
don (staff.) 

Acting Ensigns, George Leonard, John Hill, 
and George W. Kidder. 

Engineers: Acting First Assistant, W. E. 
Moore ; Acting Second Assistants, J. J. 
Ashmen and F. S. Hadly ; Third Assist- 
ant, Owen Jones; Acting Third Assist- 
ants, Edwin Bond, 0. H. Perry, and 
William Finn. 

Acting Master's Mate, Aaron Vanderbilt 
(staff.) 

Acting Master's Mates, W. F. Horton, 
Henry Gardner, Amos M. Lyons, and W. 
D. Cobb. 

coiORADO, (1st rate.) 

Commodore, Henry K. Thatcher. 

Lieutenants, George Dewey, Henry B. Ro- 
beson, and Mortimer L. Johnson. 

Surgeon, James McClelland. 

Assistant Surgeons, Robert Willard and 
B. H. Kidder. 

Paymaster, William A. Ingersoll. 

Marine Officers : Captain, L. L. Dawson ; 
First Lieutenant, E. P. Meeker. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Fred F. 
Baury. 

Acting Masters, Edwin Coffin and L. B. 
King. 



Acting Ensigns, J. L. Vennard and Willis 
G. Perry. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. W. Wallace, A. 
A. Arey, E. A. Gould, M. V. Thomas, 
and A. F. Tucker. 

Engineers: Chief, B. F. Garvin; First As- 
sistant, J. H. Bailey; Second Assistants, 
E. E. Roberts, Henry M. Quigg, and C. S. 
Maurice ; Third Assistant, M. A. Suther- 
land ; Acting Third Assistants, C. C. Fer- 
nald, J. P. Messer, and William B. Whit- 
more. 

Boatswain, John K. Bartlett. 

Gunner, William Wilson. 

Carpenter, J. G. Myers. 

Sailmaker, Nicholas Lynch. 

MINNESOTA, (Ist rate.) 

Commodore, Joseph Lanman. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James Parker. 

Lieutenants, M. S. Stuyvesant and E. T. 
Woodward. 

Passed Assistant Surgeon, J. Paul Quinn. 

Assistant Surgeons, William Longshore and 
William S. Fort. 

Paymaster, C. C. Upham. 

Marine Officers: Captain, George Butler; 
Second Lieutenant, George M. Welles. 

Acting Master, Theodore Werholf. 

Acting Ensigns, W. C. Wise, J. W. Wil- 
_ lard, James Bertwistle, F. A. O'Connor, 
and W. H. Jennings. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. M. Simms, Tallas 
Eager, and Amos Merrill. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, A. R. Eddows ; 
Acting First Assistant, J. E. Cooper ; 
Second Assistants, Guy Samson, J. C. 
Cross and H. A. Delius ; Third Assist- 
ants, James D. Lee and J. C. Kafer; Act- 
ing Third Assistant, W. H. Mott. 

Boatswain, William Bunker. 

Gunner, R. H. Cross. 

Carpenter, A. 0. Qoodsoe. 

Sailmaker, T. 0. Fassett. 

POWHATAN, (1st rate.) 

Commodore, James F. Schenck. 
Lieutenants, George M. Bache and Merrill 

Miller. 
Surgeon, H. 0. Mayo. 
Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Johnson. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON, 



317 



Paymaster, C. P. Wallach. 

Marine Officer: First Lieutenant, F. H. 
Corrie. 

Acting Master, Charles R. Wilkins. 

Ensigns, Ira Harris and A. Q. Kellogg. 

Acting Ensigns, R. D. Evans, Francis Mor- 
ris-, and Edmund Pays. 

Acting Master's Mates, George P. Abbott, 
George L. Sands, and John Clitz. 

Engineers : Chief, John A. Grier ; Acting 
First Assistant, W. H. Dobb ; Second As- 
sistants, W. S. Smith, James Long, John 
Franklin, and Michael Dundon ; Third 
Assistant, A. C. Engard; Acting Third 
Assistant, H. F. Grier. 

Acting Boatswain, James Gurney. 

Gunner, George W. Omensetter. 

Carpenter, J. MaoFarlane. 

Sailmaker, B. B. Blydenburg. 

SUSQUEHANNA, (Istrate.) 

Commod-ore, S. W. Godon. 

Lieutenant- Commander, F. B. Blake. 

Lieutenants, J. R. Bartlett and George M. 
Brown. 

Surgeon, J. O'C. Barclay. 

Assistant Surgeon, C. H. Perry. 

Paymaster, A. J. Clark. 

Chaplain, J. D. Beugless. 

Marine Officer: First Lieutenant, W. 
Wallace. 

Acting Master, H. 0. Porter. 

Ensign, E. E. Preble. 

Acting Ensigns, T. F. Laycock, W. W. 
Rhoades, and 0. C. K. Benham. 

Acting Master's Mates, Charles Garrisford, 
W. H. Sprague, M. S. Cooper, and S. T. 
Paine. 

Engineers : Chief, John Johnson ; First As- 
sistant, Isaac S. Finney; Second Assis- 
tants, James Renshaw, J. H. Hatchinson, 
and Henry A. Smith ; Third Assistants, 
Thomas Crummey and C. F. Marsland ; 
Acting Third Assistant, Bema Cook. 

Boatswain, Z. Whitmarsh. 

Gunner, E. J. Waugh. 

Carpenter, J. E. Miller. 

Sailmaker, John A. Holbrook. 

HEW IRONSIDES, (Ist rate.) 

Commodore, William Radford. 

Lieutenant-Commander, R. L. Phythian, 

Lieutenants, Antoine R. McNair, H. B. 
Rumsey, and H. J. Blake. 

Surgeon, Edward Shippen. 

Assistant Surgeon, George A. Bright. 

Paymaster, George Plunkett. 

Marine Officer : First Lieutenant, R. S. 
Collom. 

Acting Masters, E. S. Conner and Benja- 
min R. Dorey. 



Acting Ensigns, Walter Pearce, William A. 
Duer, and John M. King. 

Acting Master's Mates, C. C. Bamford, 
Joseph F. Silver and Willam E. Wilson. 

Engineers : Chief, Alexander Greer ; Second 
Assistants, John H. Hunt, William S. 
Cherry, William J. Reed, Nathan P. 
Towue, and William S. Wells ; Third As- 
sistants, John E. Stevenson and A. H. 
Henderson. 

Boatswain, William Leeds. 

Gunner, William Cope. 

Carpenter, Joseph E. Cox, 

Saibnaker, George T. Lozier. 

SANTiAao SE CUBA, (2d rate.) 

Captain, 0. S. Gllsson. 

Lieutenant, N. H. Farqnhar. 

Passed Assistant Surgeon, A S. Oberly. 

Assistant Surgeon, J. D. Murphy. 

Acting Masters, J. A. Hannum and F. H. 
Wilkes. 

Acting Ensigns, T. Delano, E. C. Bowers 
and Charles H. Pierce. 

Acting Master's Mates, Richard Lyons, S. 
W. Kempton, E. C. Finney, and R. S. 
Shepard. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Solon Farrar; 
Acting Second Assistants, C. R. Weaver 
and F. W. H. Whittaker; Acting Thifd 
Assistants, George Barnard, R. E. Hen- 
ley, C. R. Merrill, Joseph Jordan, and 
George A. Barnard. 

Acting Gunner, J. W. Irwin. 

WABASH, (1st rate.) 

Captain, Melancton Smith. 
Lieutenant-Commander, C H. Cushman. 
Lieutenants, E. 0. V. Blake and H. C. 

Tallman. 
Surgeon, H. F. McSherry. 
Passed Assistant Surgeon, James H. Tink- 

ham. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, N. L. Campbell. 
Paymaster, George Cochran. 
Chaplain, Charles A. Davis. 
Marine Officer: Second Lieutenant, L. E. 

Fagan. 
Acting Masters, W. XJ. Grozier and S. J. 

White. 
Acting Ensigns, George T. Davis, Whitman 

Chase, E. A. Small, and Joseph F. Brown. 
Acting Master's Mates, Wm. J. Lewis, 

Daniel E. Knox, J. J. Fuller, Wm. Read, 

E. P. Blague, H. C. Thoburn, and Jamea 

B. Lukens. 
Engineers : Chief, A. C. Stimers ; Second 

Assistants, Joseph 8. Green, Philip R. 

Voorhees, Wm. R. Williamson, A. Mich- 

iuer, and A. W. Buokhout ; Acting Third 

Assistants, John W. Collins, William H. 

Peabody, and John T. Smith. 



318 



NOETH ATLANTIC SQITADRON. 



Boatswuin, Charles Miller. 
Gunner, Coruelius Dugaa. 
Carpenter, William Hjde. 
Sailmaker, H. W. Frankland. 

VAKDEBBiLT, (2d rate.) 

Captain, Charles AV. Pickering. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Joseph D. 
Sauels. 

Surgeon, Joseph Wilson. 

Assistant Surgeon, Luther M. Lyon. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, James E. Tol- 
free. 

Marine Officer: First Lieutenant, Wm. H. 
Parker. 

Acting Masters, Albert M. Keith and L. F. 
Timmerman. 

Acting Ensigns, A. P. Sampson and Elisha 
N. Snow. 

Acting Master's Mates, F. B. Atkinson, 
Ed. Thompson, Jespe B. Stout, Ezra B. 
Pope, and Edward Kearns. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, John Germaine ; 
Acting First Assistant, Wm. H. Golden ; 
Acting Second Assistants, Wm. Welles 
and A. Williams ; Acting Third Assis- 
tants, John Hyalop, Martin Glennon, 
George Germaine, John O'Neill, William 
Wright, and William H. Garrison. 

Boatswain, Jasper Coghlan. 

Gunner, George Sirian. 

Carpenter, T. H. Bishop. 

JCNIATA, (2d rate.) 

Captain, William R. Taylor. 

Lieutenant, F. V. McNair. 

Surgeon, A. C. Gorgas. 

Paymaster, Casper Schenck. 

Acting Master, C. H. Hamilton. 

Ensign, C. McGregor. 

Acting Ensigns, W. D. Price and S. S. Bis- 
Bell. 

Acting Master's Mates, Lewis Goeltz, W. F. 
Warniok, and George H. Prescott. 

Engineers : Chief, J. FoUansbee ; Acting 
First Assistant, J. E. Fox ; Second As- 
sistants, J. Van Hovenbury and John 
Everding ; Third Assistants, Everett Bat- 
telle and F. C. Burchard ; Acting Third 
Assistants, B. F. Lewis and Thomas Con- 
nor. 

Boatswain, J. A. Selmer. 

Gunner, D. A. Eoe. 

Carpenter, John Mills. 

JOBT JACKSON, (2d rate.) 

Captain, B. F. Sands. 
Lieutenant-Commander, Bush E. Wallace. 
Lieutenant, S. H. Hunt. 
Surgeon, Philip Wales. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, B. J. O'Clalla- 
ghan. 



Paymaster, Clifton Hellen. 

Acting Master, H. F. Moffatt. 

Acting Ensigns, S. K. Hopkins and John J. 
Reagnan. 

Acting Master's Mates, H. St. C. Eytinge, 
James D. Moore, George W. Smoot, Frank 
A. Powers, and Charles Moran. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Rodney Smith; 
Acting First Assistanis, Jared Day and 
John A. Hill ; Acting Second Assistants, 
John Herron and George T. Gibbs ; Act- 
ing Third Assistants, Charles S. Wake- 
field and William Prentiss. 

Boatswain, P. A. Chason. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas Reese. 

Carpenter, E. Thompson. 

SHENANDOAH, (2d rate.) 

Captain, Duniel B. Ridgely. 

Lieutenant, Smith W. Nichols. 

Surgeon, James McMasler. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. M. Guild. 

Acting Masters, John S. Watson, W. H. 

Brice, and Joseph A. BuUard. 
Ensigns, Yates Sterling and J. H. Sands. 
Acting Master's Mates, L. H. White, Thomas 

H. Wheeler, and T. D. Wendell. 
Engineers : Acting Chief, Nelson Winans ; 

Sucond Assistant, E. A. Magee ; Acting 

Second Assistant, James S. Kelleper ; 

Third Assistants, D. M. Fulmer, F. W. 

Towner, and Wm. Bond. 
Boatswain, James H. Polly. 
Gunner, George Edmond. 

TicoNDEROGA, (2d rate.) 

Captain, Charles Steedman. 

Lieutenant, George B. White. 

Actiog Volunteer Lieutenant, L. G. Vas- 
eallo. 

Surgeon, C. J. Cleborne. 

Paymaster, H. M. Denniston. 

Ensigns, W. W. Maclay, A. S. Crownin- 
shield, and G. W. Coffin. 

Marine Officer : First Lieutenant, C. F. 
Williams. 

Acting Master's Mates, William Charlton, 
Jr., E. A. Sibell, William Cooper, and L. 
Norton. 

Engineers : Chief, T. J. Jones ; Second As- 
sistant, H. H. Barrett; Acting Second 
Assistants, R J. Middleton and M. Smith ; 
Acting Third Assistants, 0. Baasett, H. 
M. Noyes, M. Thaster, and S. J. Hobbs. 

Boatswain, H. E. Barnes. 

Gunner, Joseph Smith. 

Acting Carpenter, M. E. Curley. 

Sailmaker, J. C. Herbert. 

BKooKLTw, (2d rate.) 

Captain, James Alden. 
Lieutenant, Thomas L. Swann. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



319 



Surgeon, George Mauleby. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. S Pitkin. 

Paymaster, G. E. Thornton. 
-Alarine Officer: Ciipiain, G. P. Houston. 

Acting Master, llobert Barstow. 

Ensigns, D. R. Cassell, C. H. Pendleton, and 
C. D. Sigsbee. 

Acting Eusigu, C H. Llttlefield. 

Acting Masiei'u Mates, Tliomas Stanfield, 
J. W. De Camp, and R. H. Taylor. 

Engineers: Chid', Mortimer Kellogg; Second 
Assistants, VVm. H. G. West, Thomas 
Lynch, George E Tower, and Joel A. Bul- 
lard ; Aciing Second Assistant, R. D. 
Gibersou ; Acting Third Assistants, John 
Matthews, H. U. Arthur, and Timothy 
Flanders. 

Boatswain, Robert McDonald. 

Acting Gunner John Quevedo. 

Carpenter, Robert G. Thomas. 

Sailmaker, Daniel C. Braytou. 

inscAEOEA, (3d rate.) 

Commander, James M. Frailey. 

liieutenantCommander, Weld N. Allen. 

Surgeon, John Y. Taylor. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, F. J. Painter. 

Acting Master, Alex. Tillinghast. 

Acting Ensigns, Samuel L. Griffin, Charles 
H. Carey, Oliver Swain, and S. E. Willits. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. A. H. Wilmuth 
and Arthur F. Aldrick. 

Engineers : Chief, A. J. Kiersted ; Acting 
First Assistant, Joseph McEjiight ; Acting 
Second Assistants, Wm. H. Andress and 
A. N. Gilmore ; Acting Third Assistants, 
Alexander Dempster, William B. Snow, 
and Jesse H. Chesnew. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas Grail. 

MONADNOOK, (3d rate.) 

Commander, E. G. Parrott. 

Lieutenant-Commander, J. N. Miller. 

Acting Masters, B. F. MiUikin and S. H. 
Mead. 

Acting Ensigns, W. B. Mix, T. W. Swift, 
Jr., and P. Davison. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, James Wilton. 

Assistant Paymaster, J. S. Woolson. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, J. Q. A. Zeigler ; 
Acting First Assistants, S. A. Randall 
and W. A. Philips ; Acting Second Assist- 
ants, B. C. DuPlaine and B. Smith ; Act- 
ing Third Assistants, R. Aldrich, W. P. 
Wnittemore, John Brice, and X. J. Wilde. 

Gunner, P. Barrett. 

EHODB ISLAND, (2d rate.) 

Commander, Stephen D. Trenchard. 
Lieutenant, Frederick R. Smith. 
Assistant Surgeon, E. B. Bingham. 
Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Darling. 



Acting Masters, Charles 0. Niell and Z. L. 

Fanner. 
Acting Ensigns, Nicholas Pratt, R. 0. Lan- 

fare, and Samuel Pope. 
Acting Master's Mates, John P. Fisher, E. 

E. Bradbury, H. R. Gardner, George H. 

Appleton, and R. Wallace. 
Engineers : Acting Chief, John F. Mo- 

Cutcheou ; Aciing Second Assistants, J. 

W. Smith and Charles W. RadiU. Acting 

Third Assistants, Charles VV. Piugg, Wm. 

J. Patterson, William H. McCoy, John A. 

Hughes, and W. B. Bayley. 
Gunner, Henry Hamilton. 

CHiooPEE, (3d rate.) 

Commander, A. D. Harrell. 

Lieutenant E. A. Walker. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, G. L. Simpson. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Mulford, 

Jr. 
Acting Master, J. D. Wella. 
Acting Ensigns, J. A. Crossmau and A. D. 

Henderson. 
Acting Master's Mates, C. C- Johnson, J. 

H. Goodmanson, and J, A. B'ilcLier. 
Engineers: First Assistant, P. J. Levering; 

Second Assistant, W.Uiam Pollard; Third 

Assistants, D. M. Egbert, A. G. Bonsall, 

and J. B. Upham. ' 

Acting Gunner, W. Back. 

NEKEUS, (3d rate.) 

Commander J. C. Howell. 

Lieutenant H. E. MuUan. 

Acting Master, £. L. Haines. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, J. K. Walsh. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, B. P. Monroe. 

Acting Ensigns, E. G. Dayton, George M. 
Smith, and George Anderson. 

Acting Master's Mates, William Rushmore. 
W. B. Spencer, H. E. Giraud, and Wil- 
liam Gromack. 

Engineers: Acting First Assistant, Stephen 
Henton ; Acting Second Assistants, R. F. 
Roswald and J. A. Patterson ; Acting 
Third Assistants, T. Tilton, H. J. Allen, 
and R. R. Throckmorton. 

Acting Gunner, J. McCoffrey. 

MOHICAN, (3d rate.) 

Commander, Daniel Ammen. 

Lieutenant, J. D. Marvin. 

Surgeon, Charles Martin. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. C. Canning. 

Acting Master, Wm. Burdett. 

Acting Ensigns, B. F. Blair and H. T. Page. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. A. Shaffer, J. G. 
Paine, and Charles P. Cape. 

Engineers : First Assistant, H. S. Davids ; 
Second Assistant, John K. Smedley ; Act- 
ing Second Assistants, Enoch George and 



320 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADEON. 



Charles Buckelew; Acting Third Assist- 
ants, James O'Herron and WUIiam W. 
Chadwiok. 

Acting Boatswain, J. B. Aiken. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas S. Cassidy. 

KEYSTONE STATE, (3d rate.) 

Commander, Henry Bolando. 

Lieutenant, James P. Robertson. 

Acting Masters, L. E. Began and William 
T. Buck. 

Acting Ensigns, Charles M. Bird, John C. 
Murphy, frank E. Ford, and J. T. Eidg- 
way. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, A. E. Emery. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. W. Fairfield. 

Acting Master's Mates, D. G. Conger and 
W. H, Howard. 

Engineers: Acting First Assistant, Pearson 
L. Fry ; Acting Second Assistant, A. B. 
Kinney ; Acting Third Assistants, Wil- 
liam Brown, Joseph Smith, J. B. Wilbar, 
and Charles A. Blake. 

Acting Gunner, Daniel L. Briggs. 

MENDOTA, (3d rate.) 

Commander, Edward T. Nichols. 

Acting Masters, Lathrop Wright, Maurice 

Digard, and Thomas Smith. 
Acting Ensigns, W. B. Barnes, R. B. Pray, 

Isaac Thayer, and R. E. Peck. 
Acting Master's Mates, E. S. McDonald and 

P. Cleary. 
Engineers : First Assistant, A. V. Frazer ; 

Second Assistants, B. Bunceand D. Jones; 

Acting Third Assistants, D. R. MoElroy, 

H. S. Rose, and L. M. Poole. 
Acting Gunner, James Cornos. 

losoo, (3d rate.) 

Commander John Guest. 

Lieutenant, Charles L. Franklin. 

Acting Ensigns, Wm. Jamison, Ulriok Field- 
burg, Henry Baker, and Paul Ware. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Kirk H. Ban- 
croft. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, LouisL.Scovel. 

Acting Master's Mates, Theodore A. Corn- 
stock, Halsted Hennans, and Charles Pea- 
cook. 

Engineers : First Assistant, Zephaniah Tal- 
bot ; Second Assistant, Elijah Laws ; Act- 
ing Third Assistants, Harvey Clapp, Jas. 
MoNabb, and Charles M. S. Gerry. 

Acting Gunner, Theodore M. Benton. 

OSCEOLA, (3d rate.) 

Commander, John M. B. Glitz. 
Lieutenant, J. Weidman. 
Assistant Surgeon, George F. Winslow. 
Assistant Paymaster, Edward Bellows. 



Acting Masters, Edward B. Hussey and 

Willett Mott. 
Acting Ensigns, S. L. LaDieu, J. F. Merry, 

and F. C. Warner. 
Acting Master's Mates, Thomas Rogers, H. 

G. Robinson, and C. S. Hardy. 
Engineers : Acting First Assistant, Thomas 

MoCausland ; Acting Second Assistant, 

Richard Doran ; Acting Third Assistants, 

Robert Berryman, Charles J. Cooper, and 

E. J. Swords. 
Acting Gunner, J. C. Breslyn. 

PAWTUXET, (3d rate.) 

Commander, James H. Spotts. 

Lieutenant, Allen V. Reed. 

Acting Ensigns, A. F. West, J. A. Slamm, 

J. 0. Winchester, and P. J. Markoe. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Henry Johnson. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, George A. Em- 

merson. 
Acting Master's Mates, C. H. Bellows, F. 

Heslerwood, and L. F. Pipanti. 
Engineers : Second Assistants, A. H. Able, 

MinorN. Knowlton, and James G. Cooper. 

Acting Third Assistant, N. G. Vandegrift. 
Gunner, J. D. Fletcher. 

MACKINAW, (3d rate.) 

Commander, J. C. Beaumont. 

Acting Master, A. J. Louch. 

Acting Ensigns, William H. Penfield, J. T. 
Blanchard, and Joseph Estes. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Joseph T. Cot- 
trell. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, William T. 
Whittmore. 

Acting Master's Mates, John A. Thomas, 
Solomon Barstow, and Ed. K. Green. 

Engineers: First Assistant, Jefferson Young; 
Second Assistant, Daniel A. Sawyer ; 
Third Assistants, K. W. Milligan and 
Sylvanus Molntyre ; Acting Third Assist- 
ants, Patrick Hagan and J. W. Eeed. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas Keer. 

SAUQUS, (4th rate.) 

Commander, Edmund R. Colhoun. 

Lieutenant, Benjamin F. Day. 

Acting Master, Basil W. Leary. 

Acting Ensigns, Charles A. Henriokeon, Ira 

Barsley, and John P. Arnett. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Westcott. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, George A. 

Andrews. 
Engineers : Acting Chief. John L. Peake ; 

Acting First Assistants, Andrew Inglisa 

and John Carron; Second Assistant, 0. C. 

Lewis; Acting Second Assistant, A. F. 

Rockefeller ; Acting Third Assistant, 

William J. Bradley. 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



321 



QUAKER CITY, (2d rate.) 

Coram and ei'jW. F. Spicer. 

Ijieutenant, Silas Casey, Jr. 

Acting Master, S. A. Wianerton. 

Acting Ensigns, C. J. Hill, Kiohard Wilkin- 
son, and F. I). Jaoobson. 

Acting Assistant Surgeons, Ira C. Wliite- 
head and G. W. Gale. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, L. A. Fraley. 

Acting Master's Mates, George E. Sanborne 
and J. B. Tew. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, G. W. Farrar; 
Second Assistant, George J. Burnap; Act- 
ing Second Assistants, W. J. Howard, J. 
K. Hickey, William Mason, and Joseph 
H. Mathews ; Acting Third Assistants, 

E. Prest, I. R. Peterson, J. D. Wauklin, 
and E. E. Porter. 

Acting Gunner, Joseph Furlong. 

PONTOOSUC, (3d rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, Wm. G. Temple. 
Acting Masters, B. S. Meeks and C. H. 

FriS)ie. 
Acting Ensigns, A. D. Campbell, J. J. Kane, 

and L. R. Chester. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Pierson. 
Assistant Paymaster, G. A. Lyon. 
Acting Master's Mates, E. H. Richardson, 

F. C. Bailey, Thos. Brown and D. Lewis. 
En^neers; First Assistant, Geo. J. Barry, 

Second Asdistant, M. T. Sunstron and E. 
J. Whittaker; Third Assistant J. H. 
Thomas ; Acting Third Assistant, G. C. 
Brown. 
Acting Gunner, C. Moran. 

A. D. VANCE, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, J. H. Upshur. 
Acting Masters, G. Cottrell andC. M. Lane. 
Acting Ensigns, W. W. Smith, C. F. Ware, 

C. E. Clark, and W. J. Eldridge. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, B. F. Howell. 
Engineers : Acting First Assistant, D. 0. 

Chesters; Acting Second Assistants, C. G. 

Stevens, C. S. Servoss, and Geo. Devine ; 

Acting Third Assistants, Wm. Madden, G. 

H. Whittemore, and C. B. Nichols. 

TAKTio, (-Ith rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, T. C. Harris. 

Acting Master, S. C. Macintire. 

Acting Ensigns, J. C. Lord, Edw. Winne- 

more, J. F. Churchill, and B. B. Soden- 

berry. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, H. K. Wheeler. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, S. B. Huey. 
Engineers : Second Assistants, W. H. Mes- 

singer, J. J. Noble, and H. C. Beokwith ; 

Third Assistant, H. F. Loveaire ; Aoting 

Third Assistant, George Holton. 
21 



SASSAOUS, (3d rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, John L. Davis. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, A. W. Mul- 
daur. 

Acting Ensigns, Wm. H. Mayer, Jr., Au- 
gust Adler, H. W. O'Harra, and David 
Stephen. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George E. Mo- 
Pherson. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Garth- 
waite. 

Acting Master's Mates, Thomas D. Marble 
and John S. O'Brien. 

Engineers : Second Assistants, John W. 
Haxley, Robert N. Ellis, and 0. W. Alli- 
son ; Acting Third Assistants, Wm. Ray- 
nor, H. S. Mack, and A. Bigelow. 

Acting Gunner, Neil Martin. 

TAOONY, (3d rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, W. T. Truxtun. 

Acting Masters, N. S. Morgan, R. Soramers, 
and S. Blount. 

Acting Ensigns, J. B. Taney, Thos. Geld- 
ing, E. L. Bourne, and F. H. Fisher. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George Hopkins. 

ActingAssistant Pay master, W.S. Horsford. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. A. Orcutt and F. 
W. Worstell. 

Engineers: First Assistant, T. M. Dukehart; 
Second Assistants, C. E Lee and H. Par- 
ker, Jr. ; Acting Third Assistant, A. D. 
Wood. 

KANSAS, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, P. G. Watmough. 
Acting Masters, Samuel Hall and W. S. 

Folson. 
Acting Ensigns, George C. Williams, Chas. 

D. Thompson, and Charles B. Staples. 
Assistant Surgeon, Isaac Poole, 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, T. Merritt. 
Engineers : Acting Second Assistant, Hugh 

Rafferty ; Acting Third Assistants, J. W. 

Stole and George L. King. 

MARATANZA, (3d rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, George W. Young. 

Acting Masters, D. E. Taylor and J. B. 
Wood. 

Acting Ensigns, J. W. Crowell, II. H. CoUa- 
more, and E. Lawson. 

Acting Master's Mates, W. H. Alger, A. F. 
Williamson and C. H. Grossman. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Hamilton. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. II. Noyes. 

Engineers: Second Assistants, W. H. Kil- 
patrick and K. L. Webb ; Third Assist- 
ants, L. R. Harvey and R. D. Taylor ; 
Acting Third Assistants, E. J. Gillespie 
and J. L. Starkey. 

Acting Gunner, W. W. Bradley. 



322 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



MACMEE, (4tli rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, Ralph Chandler. 
Noting Master, Eichard Burk. 

Acting Ensigns, Ed. R. Power, W. J. Shack- 
ford, Charles P. Gifford, and Cjrus B. 
Nichola. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, David P. Good- 
hue. 

Acring Assistant Paymaster, John H. Smoot. 

Engineers ; Second Assistant, T. J. McK. 
Daniels ; Acting Second Assistant, Wm. 
Veitch ; Third Assistants, J. M. Clark, 
C. R. Mosher, and G. A. Peltz. 

PEQDOT, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, D. L. Braine. 

Acting Masters, L. H. Beattie and Wm. F. 
Chase. 

Acting Ensigns, George Lamb, H. W. Lor- 
Ing, and A. Smalley. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, H. R. Watts. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Calvin G. 
Hutchinson. 

Engineers : Second Assistants, A. H. Fisher 
and G. C. Cook ; Third Assistants, James 
Wylie and John W. Gardner ; Acting 
Third Assistant, George W. Pi.ymes. 

NYAOK, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, L. H. Newman. 

Acting Master, H. W. Grinnell. 

Acting Ensigns, H. B. Colby, Charles Nel- 
son, J W. Hopkins, G. H. Barrows, and 
James Jordan. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, B. F. Biglow. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. S. Halla- 
day. 

Engiueers : First Assistant, B. C. Bamp- 
ton ; Second Assistant, John Fornance ; 
Third Assistant, Wm. A. Wiudser; Acting 
Third Assistants, W. M. Bartram and J. 
C. Veatch. 

CANONicns, (3d rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, George E. Belk- 
nap. 

Lieutenant, R. S. McCook. 

Acting Masters, E. S. Goodwin and E. A. 
Decker. 

Acting Ensigns, C. W. Seckins, M. W. Weld, 
and F. P. Center. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. N. Beaumont. 

Assistant Paymaster, R. P. Lisle. 

Engineers : Chief, D. B. Macomb ; Acting 
First Assistant, C. G. Conklin ; Second 
Assistants, F. G. McKeen and J. M. Sa- 
vi'ile ; Acting Third Assistants, Wm. S. 
Brown, Wm. Keenau, and J. A. Chan- 
dler. 

CHIPPEWA, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, A. W. Weaver, 

Acting Master, J. W. Saunders. 



Acting Ensigns, George H. Wood, Edward 

Tilghman, W. H. De Gross, and William 

A. Taylor. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, J. E. Gregory. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, James M. 

Flood. 
Engineers : Second Assistant, Jos. Watters; 

Acting Second Assistant, A. A. Winship ; 

Acting Third Assistants, E. W. Wilton 

and Henry Eomain. 

nuADiLLA, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, Frank M. Ramsay. 

Acting Master, John M. Skilling.s. 

Acting Ensigns, John CuUaton, Wm. Field, 
Charles Wiedebien, and William Hanson. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, D. C Burleigh. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. G. Hobbs. 

Acting Master's Mates, Charles H. Smith 
and Enoch M. Reed. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, Benj. 
F. Bee; Acting Second Assistant, Lewis 
M. Ryfenburgh; Act ing Third A.ssistants, 
William D. Kay, James Curran, and John 
D. Larkius. 

MAHOPAC, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant Commander, E. E, Potter. 

Acting Masters, C. E. Harris and D. K. 
Kenersou. 

Acting Ensigns, J. E. Jones, W. E. Jones, 
and S. C. Hall. 

Assistant Surgeon, P. B. A. Lewis. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Addison Poole. 

Eugineers : Acting Chief, M. T. Chevers ; 
Acting First Assistant, Charles Dougherty; 
Acting Second Assistant, Wesley Ran- 
dall ; Acting Third Assistants, J. G. 
Brown, C. A. Euggrau, C. 0. Putnam, 
and J. W. BuelL 

HURON, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas 0. Self- 
ridge. 

Acting Master, Benjamin Whitmore. 

Acting Ensigns, Robert Sheppard, Samuel 
H. Maunder, Wm. H. H. Curtis, and 
Andrew MoCleary. 

Acting Master's Mate, Eugene Coleman. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, James McMillan. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles D. 
CoUom. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, James 
Blinkinsopp ; Acting Second Assistants, 
Henry T. Hayden and Matthew Harloc ; 
Acting Third Assistants, Theodore F. 
Burket and Emory G. IngoUs. 

SENECA, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant-Commander, Montgomery Si- 
card. 



NOETH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



323 



Acting Master, WilUam H. Maig. 

Acting Ensigns, William Schutz, Thomas 
Mason, William B. Pierce, and LeanJer 
C. Owen. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, K. H. Greene. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, M. B. Gush- 
ing. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, James 
P. Sweet; Acting Second Assistant, A1-. 
fred Catchpole ; Acting Third Assistants, 
Sanford A. Slater, A. J. Doty, and T. J. 
Reaney. 

MONTICELLO, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant, W. B. Gushing. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, D. A. Gamp- 
bell. 

Acting Masters, Gharles A. Petlit and E. A. 
Elliott. 

Acting Ensigns, William H. Gibson, P. B. 
Huntingdon, J. A. Puokett, and J. S. 
Edwards. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, J. P. Billard. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, John Turey. 

Acting Master's Mates, Charles Croton and 
J. S. Clark. 

Engineers : Second Assistant, H. Missiner ; 
Acting Second Assistant, C. A. JIartine ; 
Acting Third Assistants, P. McKiuley, 
W. K. Cawl, and J. Macallum. 

GBTTTSBtiRG, (4th rate.) 

Lieutenant, R. H. Lamson. 

Acting Master, G. B. Dahlgren. 

Acting Ensigns, A. S. Laighfon, P. P. B. 
Sands, P. A. Gross, M. C. Keith, and 
Charles Miller. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George S. Eddy. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, R. H. Gillett. 

Acting Master's Mates, H. J. Derbyshire 
and T. H. P. Gross. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, G. S. 
Perkins ; Acting Second Assistants, J. 
M. Case, E. G. Mayloy, and A. J. Pix- 
ley ; Acting Third Assistants, E. B. Car- 
ter and J. W. Homans. 

ALABAMA, (3d rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, A. R. Laug- 
thorne. 

Acting Master, William Bates. 

Acting Ensigns, Albert Taylor, Thomas 
Williams, and Lewall P. Graves. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, D. D. T. Nestell. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Ed. E,. Gibson. 

Acting Master's Mates, C. F. Elmore, C. S. 
Wilcox, and David H. Hall. 

Engineers : First Assistant, Edward Far- 
mer ; Acting Second Assistants, J. G. 
Rossman, J. C. Lewis, and Greenville 
Lewis ; Acting Third Assistants, Ezra 
Gray and George Corrie. 



MONTQOMERT, (3d rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, T. C. Dunn. 

Acting Masters, W. N. Wells and A. F. 
Davis. 

Acting Ensigns, E. T. Manter, G. G. Whit- 
ing, and Robert Wiley. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, John Blackmer. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. Watson. 

Acting Master's Mates, T. J. Walker and 
C. A. Neill. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, G. H. 
Wade ; Acting Second Assistants, John 
McEwen, J. Williams, and J. Allen; Act- 
ing Third Assistants, G. H. Brown and 
A. Tester. 

GOVERNOR EUOKINGDAM, (3d rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, John Mao- 

Dearmid. 
Acting Ensigns, Charles H. Sawyer, L. W. 

Smith, D. M. Gaskins, and L. P. Cassan. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. S. Parker. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, G. B. Tripp. 
Acting Master's Mates, J. W. Gardner, P. 

E. Poole, and W. W. Hunter. 
Engineers: Acting First Assistant, F. E. 

Potter ; Acting Second Assistant, Eugene 

Mack ; Acting Third Assistants, Thomas 

Foley, Owen Kauey, James Fitzpatrick, 

and Charles Ward. 

CHEROKEE, (4th rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, William E. 

Dennison. 
Acting Ensigns, T. P. De Luce, John Parry, 

A. T. Parsons, and Charles B. Dickman. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, E. T. T. Marsh. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, John C. Os- 

lerloh. 
Engineers: Acting First Assistant, A. W. 

Reynolds; Acting Second Assistants, F. 

A. Thurber and J. H. Potts ; Acting 

Third Assistants, John Gilmore, and A. 

J. Sanburn. 

HOWQUAH, (4th rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, J. W. Balch. 
Acting Ensigns, G. P. St. John and John 

Sayres. 
Acting Assistant Paymasters, E. W. Brooks. 
Acting Master's Mates, Robert B. Smith 

and F. P. Haskell. 
Engineers : Acting Second Assistants, Wm. 

G. McLane, David R. Wylie and J. L. 

De Mott ; Acting Third Assistants, F. W. 

Morris, Jr., and Arthur O'Brien. 

EMMA, (4tli rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, J. JI. Wil- 
liams. 



324 



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 



Acting Ensigns, C. Zimmerman, D. S. Bee- 
tle, J. S. Sampson, and J. C. TuUer. 

Acting Master's Mate, R. P. Herrick. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George Doig. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. H. Ham- 
matt. 

Ensigns: Acting Second Assistant, E.Barry; 
Acting Third Assistants, A. L. Churchill, 
J. C. Smith, R. H. Ryan, J. W. Grant, 
and J. N. Wells. 

TRI3TAM SHANDT, (4th rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, F. M. Green. 
Acting Ensigns, Benjamin Wood, James H. 

Nash, Thomas M. Smith, S. T. Deaderer 

and John Owens. 
Acting Master's Mates, Puobert Clifford, 

Maurice Wagg, and Frank T. Baldwin. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, F. R. Stow. 
Engineers: Acting First Assistant, W. W. 

Whiting ; Acting Second Assistants, W. 

H. Pratt, and H. W. Miller ; Acting Third 

Assistants, Richard Wareham, Thomas 

Peuting, William Glading, and Thomas 

Holtin. 

MOTJNT VERNON, (4th rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, James Fra- 
then. 

Acting Master, E. W. White. 

Acting Ensigns, Francis M. Paine, Charles 
G. Walstrom, Henry F. Clevirly and 
Jason Ryon. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, William H. Ben- 
nett. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Henry B 
Browne. 

Acting Master's Mate, Henry Rogers. 

Engineers : Acting Second Assistants, Jas. 
PI. Horseford and Hugh S. Short ; Acting 
Third Assistants, George Ducker and 
William H. Smith. 

BKiTTANiA, (4th rate.) 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Samuel Huse. 
Acting Masters, J. S. Coney and S. J. White. 
Acting Ensigns, A. J. Lowell and W. H. 

Bryant. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, F. Niekerson. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. B. Culver. 
Acting Master's Mates, R. L. M. Jones and 

W. W. Reed. 
Engineers: Acting Second Assistants, J. 

Fernald and J. M. Barron ; Acting Third 



Assistants, Wm. D. Butts, Samuel Dale, 
and F. S. Andrews. 

CEKES, (4th rate.) 

Acting Master, H. H. Foster. 

Acting Ensigns, T. S. Russell and Samuel 

Weskett. 
Acting Master's Mate, James R. Hopkins. 
Engineers : Acting Third Assistants, John 

A. Franks, William H. Touohton, and 
Richard Fowler. 

LITTLE ADA, (4th rate.) 

Acting Master, S. P. Crafts. 
Acting Ensign, J. T. Atkins. 
Acting Master's Mates, W. H. Joseph and 

G. W. Lade. 
Engineers : Acting Second Assistant, W. H. 

Johnson ; Acting Third Assistants, B. 

Converse and J. R. Peterson. 

WILDERNESS, (4th Tate.) 

Acting Master, H. Arey. 

Acting Ensigns, B. 0. Low, C. F. Hull, C. 
E. P. Noyes, and E. S. McKeever. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, H. M. PiOgers. 

Acting Master's Mate, William Phyffe. 

Engineers : Acting Second Assistant, Pilch- 
ard Anderson ; Acting Third Assistants, 
E. A. Robinson, Walter Taylor, and 
David Bodden. 

NANSEMOND, (4th rate.) 

Acting Master, James H. Porter. 

Acting Ensigns, James B. Henderson, Wil- 
liam Hunter, and Henry Waring. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, George Hud- 
son, Jr. 

Acting Master's Mate, Arthur K.. Brown. 

Engineers: Acting Second Assistant, Ed- 
ward Aspold; Acting Third Assistants, 
Charles W. Goodwin, John T. Earle, and 
Ed. A. Reilly. 

MOCCASIN, (4th rate.) 

Acting Ensign, James Brown. 

Acting Master's Mates, Joseph Fuller, John 

Foster, and John S. Sinclair. 
Engineers : Acting Second Assistant, T. F. 

Archer; Acting Third Assistants, C. H. 

Wilson, William H. Garrecht, and William 

B. Boyd. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



BATTLE OF PORT KOYAL, NOVEMBER 7, 1861. 



STEAM FEIQATB WABASH, (Flag-sllip.) 

Flag-officer, Samuel F. Du Pont. 

Fleet Captain, Charles H. Davis. 

Commander, C. P. R. Rodgers. 

Lieutenants, Thomas G. Corben, John H. 
Upshur, Stephen B. Luce, and E. 0. Mat- 
thews. 

Acting Lieutenant, John S. Barnes. 

Acting Masters, S. W. Preston, R. H. Lam- 
son, Louis KempfF, J. H. Rowland, J. P. 
Robertson, T. Stiles, J. E. Rockwell, G. 
W. Palmer, H. M. Gregory, William H. 
West, and William A. West. 

Surgeon, George Clymer. 

Assistant Surgeons, James J. Magee, Ed- 
ward M. Stiles, and James H. Hears. 

Paymaster, John S. Gulick. 

Chaplain, G. W. Dorrence. 

Secretory, Alexander McKinley. 

Chief Engineer, J. W. King. 

First Assistant Engineer, R. W. MoCleery. 

Second Assistant Engineers, F. J. Loveriiig 
and T. A. Stevens. 

Third Assistant Engineers, P. H. Voor- 
hees, H. H. Molony, William C. William- 
eon, and Hillery Missiner. 

Midshipmen, James Wallace, M. L. John- 
son, P. W. Lowry, and Frederick Pear- 
son. 

Flag Officer's Clerk, L. C. Styles. 

Captain's Clerk, L. B. Blydenberg. 

Paymaster's Clerks, F. R. Didier and G. F. 
De Lacey. 

Boatswain, Jasper Coughlan. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas Stewart. 

Carpenter, Charles Boardman. 

Sailmaker, WiUiara N. Maull. 

STEAM-SLOOP SUSQUEHANNA. 

Captain, J. L. Lardner. 

Lientenants, Clark H. Wells, Jonathan 

Young, and Aaron W. Weaver. 
Acting Master's, George B. Livingston, 

George H. Bradbury, and A. L. B. Zerega. 
Surgeon, Joseph Beale. 
Assistant Surgeon, H. C. Nelson. 
Paymaster, Washington Irving. 
Chief Engineer, George Sewell. 
Second Assistant Engineer, F. E. Brown. 
Third AssistantEngineers, James Renshaw, 

James Butterworth, D. M. Greene, E. R. 

Arnold, and William II. Fuller. 



Master's Mates, R. F. Cook. W. L. Chur- 
chill, James 0. Barnes, F. G. Adams, 
and E. M. Baldwin. 

Paymaster's Clerk, F. E. Beale. 

Acting Boatswain, Charles Miller. 

Acting Gunner, William H. Summer. 

Carpenter, G. M. Doughty. 

Assistant Sailmaker, J. C. Herbert. 

STEAM-SLOOP MOHICAN. 

Commander, S. W. Godon. 

Lieutenants, E. K. Owen and Henry W. 
Miller. 

Acting Masters, G. W. Ewer, Jefferson Ford, 
and Luther Nickerson. 

Surgeon, J. S. Kitchen. 

Assistant Paymaster, William H. Thompson. 

Chief Engineer, E. D. Robie. 

Second Assistant Engineers, Oscar H. Lack- 
ey and Emery J. Brooks. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Peter A. Bear- 
ick, Mayland Cuthbert, and Absalom 
Kirby. 

Master's Mates, J. H. Pitman and Andrew 
Jackson. 

Captain's Clerk, J. N. Whelan. 

Paymaster's Clerk, C. J. Lowndes. 

Boatswain, John Ross. 

Gunner, Charles Stewart. 

Carpenter, William H. Hyde. 

SLOOP VANDALIA. 

Commander, F. S. Haggarty. 

Lieutenants, W. D. Whiting, Ralph Chand- 
ler, Henry Wilson, and Charles E. Flem- 
ing. 

Master, G. W. Hayward. 

Surgeon, Charles Eversfield. 

Assistant Surgeon, Henry F. McSherry. 

First Lieutenant Marines, J. Sohermerljorn. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Rufus Parks. 

Midshipman, Louis Kimpff. 

Acting Master's Mates, P. H. Bacon, C. N. 
Hicks, and George Thomas. 

STEAMER SEMINOLE. 

Commander, John P. Gillis. 
Master, Antoine B. McNair. 
Acting Masters, Thomas S. Steele, Steven 

G. Russell, and Benjamin S. Melville. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Louis Sands. 



325 



326 



SOUTH ATLANTIC SQUADKOlSr. 



Second Assistant Engineer, N. B. Littig. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Robert L. Har- 
ris, John Wilson, Wm. C. Starr, and T. 
L. Cooper. •■. 

Acting Master's Mates, Wm. Betts and E. 
H. Dewey. 

Commander's Clerk, Wm. H. Fuguet. 

Paymaster's Clerk, John F. Senson. 

Gunner, Benjamin Roberts. 

Acting Carpenter, Jacob M. Dallas. 

STEAMER AUGUSTA. 

Commander, E. G. Parrott. 

Lieutenant, Henry L. Howison. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Martin Duane. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Wm. U. Holmes. 

Acting Masters, Robert T. Wyatt, Nathan 
B. Heath, and John S. Watson. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, George V. 
Sloat. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Marshal 
T. Chevers. 

Actijig Third Assistant Engineers, Augus- 
tus Barnum and David J. Pollock. 

Master's Mates, James N. Johnston, Joseph 
W. North, and John W. Cummings. 

Acting Gunner, T. Bascom Watkins. 

STEAMEE BIENVILLE. 

Commander, Charles Steedman. 

Lieutenant, A. E. K. Benham. 

Acting Master's, Frank Smith, William H. 
Churchill, and Charles G. Loring. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, J. T. Coates. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, W. W. Good- 
win. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, W. T. 
Wright. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Henry 
Hill. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, J. Day 
and James Forentien. 

Acting Master's Mates, W. W. Brandt, 
Charles V. Relhy, and B. H. Shuffield. 

Acting Gunner, Joseph Smith. 

STEAM GUNBOAT UNADILLA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, N. Collins. 

Lieutenant, Charles H. Green. 

Actinp; Masters, Edward Van Sice, WiUiam 
S. Tuttle, and Peter N. Cruse. 

Assistant Surgeon, Robert L. Weber. 

Assistant Paymaster, Edward May. 

First Assistant Engineer, Edward Mars- 
land. 

Third Assistant Engineers, R. H. Thurston, 
Henry S. Leonard, and Frederick Bull, 
Jr. 

Master's Mates, David Mason, William H. 
Brice, and G. Daisy. 

Acting Master's Mate, George E. Thomas. 



STEAM GUNBOAT OTTAWA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Thomas H. Ste- 
vens. 

Lieutenant, George B. White. 

AotingMasters, William P. Dockray, Samuel 
Haines, and Rufus K. Duer. 

Assistant Surgeon, Charles 0. Carpenter. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles H. 
Noyes. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, William D. 
Dungan. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Epaphro H. 
Seymour, Edward W. Keohe, and Frank- 
lin C. Prindle. 

Master's Mates, James Finleysen and 
Henry B. Kinnan. 

STEAM GUNBOAT SENECA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Daniel Ammen. 

Lieutenant, J. G. Sproston. 

Assistant Surgeon, Newton L. Bates. 

Assistant Paymaster, W. T. Meredith. 

Acting Masters, W. G. Wright, W. Hamil- 
ton, James H. Rogers, and Henry Vau- 
ghan. 

Second Assistant Engineer, James De 
Krafft. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Theo. Allen, 
H. H. Burritt, and Thomas Lynch. 

Master's Mates, James G. Paine, Edward 
W. Fiske, and John L. Cregeer. 

STEAM-SLOOP PAWNEE. 

Captain, Percival Drayton. 

Lieutenants, R. H. Wyman, Jas. G. Max- 
well, and H. M. Blue. 

Acting Masters, A. T. Snell, John W. Bent- 
ley, and J. P. Lindsay. 

Surgeon, F. M. Gunnell. 

Paymaster, L. C. Merrill. 

Chief Engineer, William H. Rutherford. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Joseph Trilley, 
David Hardie, Newton Champion, A. 
Adamson, H. D. Sellman, »nd Benjamin 
Bunce. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. L. Winton and 
A. Washburno. 

Captain's Clerk, 6. H. Bead. 

Paymaster's Clerk, William S. Underdown. 

Boatswain, J. H. Polley. 

Gunner, Wm. Burniece. 

Carpenter, R. G. Thomas. 

Pilot, Joseph H. B,ichardson. 

STEAM GUNBOAT PEMBINA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, John P. Bank- 
head. 

Acting Masters, A. N. Mitchell, WiUiam 
Rogers, and Joseph A. Jaokaway. 

Assistant Surgeon, A. W. H. Hawkins. 

Assistant Paymaster, Edwin Stewart. 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 



327 



First Assistant Engineer, Jefferson Young. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Jolin Van Ha- 

venberg, N. Beaoli Clark, and Tliaddeua 

S. Smithi. 
Acting Master's Mates, Henry C. Cochran 

and Cliarles E. Culver. 

STEAM GUNBOAT ISAAC SMITH. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, J. W. A. Nichol- 
son. 

Acting Masters, Hugh M. Gregory, J. W. 
Dicks, and E. M. Keige. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, T. Quincy Hill. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George J. Sweet. 

First Assistant Engineer, Jacob Tucker. 

Second Assistant Engineer, James S. Tur- 
ner. 



Third Assistant Engineers, Erastus Barry 

and Calvin Howland. 
Paymaster's Clerk, Henry Archer. 
Acting Master, Lemuel Gage. 

STEAM GUNBOAT PENGUIN. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Thomas A. Budi. 
Acting Masters, Thomas A. Harris and 

John T. Blatcliford. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Isaac Wood. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, S. C. Smoot. 
Second Assistant Engineer, F. W. Forner. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Wm. Pattison. 

N. P. Randall. 
Master's Mates, W. E. Anderson and George 

N. Hood. 



WEST GULF BLOCKADma SQUADRON. 



BOMBARDMENT OF FORTS JACKSON AND ST. PHILIP, AND CAPTURE OF 
THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, APRIL, 1862. 



STEAM-SLOOP HARTFOKD. 

Flag-ofEoer, David G. Farragut. 
Captain, Henry H. Bell, (Fleet.) 
Commander, Richard Wainwright. 
Lieutenants, James S. Thornton and Albert 

Kautz. 
Fleet Surgeon, J. M. Foltz. 
Surgeon, Stewart Kennedy. 
Assistant Surgeon, Joseph Hogg. 
Paymaster, George Plunkett. 
Chief Engineer, James B. Kimball. 
Master, John C. Watson. 
Acting Masters, Daniel S. Murphy, Ezra S. 

Goodwin, Horace J. Draper, and Albert 

Cook. 
Second Assistant Engineers, John Pindy, 

Edward B. Latch, and Fletcher A. Wilson. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Conrad J. Coop- 
er, Charles M. Burchard, Isaac De Graff, 

and Albert H. Fulton. 
Acting Midshipmen, Herbert B. Tyson, 

Edward C. Haseltine, John Henry Read, 

and Henry J. Blake. 
Acting Master's Mates, Edwin J. Allen, 

Thomas Mason, Lewis S. Locke, and 

George H. Loundsberry. 
Boatswain, James Walker. 
Acting Gunner, John Duncan. 
Acting Carpenter, Jai^es H. Conley. 
Fleet Captain's Clerk, Thomas B. Waddel. 



STEAM-miQATE COLOKADO. 

Captain, Theodorus Bailey. 

Lieutenants, John L. Davis, Joseph E. De 
Haven, and Robert Boyd. 

Surgeon, Philip S. Wales. 

Assistant Surgeons, Morris H. Henry, Adri- 
an Hudson, and J. Otis Bush. 

Paymaster, A. W. Russell. 

Chief Engineer, George Gideon. 

Acting Masters, John Sherrill, Joseph W. 
Tuck, James Taylor, Tecumseh Teece, 
and William B. Stoddard. 

First Assistant Engineer, Loyd A. Williams. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, David Fra- 
ser. 

Second Assistant Engineer, J. Cox Hull. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, John 
Eraser. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Albert Murray, 
L. L. Olmstead, William L. Smith, George 
H. White, Weljster Lane, and Isaac R. 
McNary. 

Acting Midshipmen, F. J. Higgenson and 
William R. Bridgeman. 

Acting Master's Mates, Alexander Cush- 
man, Nathaniel Hobbs, Mosea W. Stone, 
Augustus Farrell, and David T. Potter. 

Boatswain, Zachariah Witmarsh. 

Gunner, James D. Barton. 

Carpenter, George B. Anderson. 



328 



WEST GTJLP SQUADRON. 



Sailmaker, Joseph C. Bradford. 
Coast Pilot, Daniel Pepper. 
Captain's Clerk, B. F. Monroe. 
Paymaster's Clerk, William K. Upham. 

STEAM-SLOOP PEHSAOOLA. 

Captain, Henry W. Morris. 

Lie.iteaants, P. A Roe and James Slillwell. 

Surgeon, J. Winthrop Taylor. 

Paymaster, George L. Davis. 

Aoring Surgeon, W. B. Dick. 

Second Lieutenant Marines, John C. Harris. 

Chief Engineer, S. D. Hebbert. 

Acting Masters, E. C. McKay and E. C. 
Sc-hultz. 

Second Assistant Engineers, S. L. P. Ayres 
and C. H. Ball. 

Third Assistant Engineers, T. Gr. Smith, J. 
L. Vanclain, J. T. Mercer, J. T. Haw- 
kins, George W. Magee, and John C. 
Huntley. 

Gunner, D. A. Roe. 

Acting Master's Mates, George A. Storm, 
Joseph Kent, and Charles Gainaford. 

Paymaster's Clerk, George C. Richardson. 

STEAM-SLOOP BEOOKLTN. 

Captain, Thomas T. Craven. 
Lieutenant, R. B. Lowry. 
Surgeon, Samuel Jackson. 
Assistant Surgeon, James S. Knight. 
Paymaster, Charles W. Abbot. 
Chief Engineer, William B. Brooks. 
Masters, J. C. Stafford, George Dewhurst, 

Lyman Wells, and James O'Kane. 
Acting Master, Thomas B. Beekering. 
First Assistant Engineer, B. E. Chassaing. 
Second Assistant Engineers, James Atkins, 

Alexander V. Eraser, Jr., and James H. 

Morrison. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Charles F. 

Mayer, Jr., B. D. Clemens, Jacob L. 

Bright, and Joseph Morgan, Jr. 
Midshipman, John Anderson. 
Acting Midshipmen, H. T. Grafton and 

John R. Bartlett. 
Master's Mates, Henry C. Leslie, Robert 

Beardsley, William Taber, and E. S. 

Lowe. 
Captain's Clerk, Joseph G. Swift. 
Paymaster's Clerk, William Robertson. 

SLOOP POETSMOtllH. 

Commander, Samuel Swartwout. 

Lieutenant, Philip C. Johnson. 

Surgeon, J. S. Duncan. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. M. Wells. 

Assistant Paymaster, Casper Schenck. 

Master, Francis 0. Davenport. 

Acting Masters, Andrew A. Ward, William 

G. Mitchell, and Gilbert Richmond. 
Acting Midshipman, Walter Abbot. 



Master's Mates, John Smith, Thomas P. 

Jones, Thomas B. Gammon, and Sidney 

S. Beck. 
Aoting Gunner, Thomas Cassidy. 
Assistant Sailmaker, Henry J. Hayden. 

STEAM-SLOOP ONEIDA. 

Commander, S. Philips Lee. 

Lieutenant, Montgomery Sicard. 

Chief Engineer, Francis C. Dade. 

Surgeon, John Y. Taylor. 

Paymaster, Charles W. Hassler. 

Master, Francis S. Brown. 

Acting Masters, Pierre Giraud, Thomas 

Edwards, and Elijah Rose. 
Midshipmen, Frederick J. Naile and 

George W. AVood. 
Second Assistant Engineers, Horace Mc- 

Murtrie and Reuben H. Fitch. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Alfred T. Brow- 

er, George W. Slivers, and Richard M. 

Hodgson. 
Captain's Clerk, Charles W. Hlggins. 
Acting Boatswain, James Herold. 
Acting Gunner, William Parker. 
Acting Master's Mates, Edward Bird, 

Daniel Clark, George B. Ailing, and John 

J. Earle, Jr. 

STE.VM-SLOOP MISSISSIPPI. 

Captain, Melanctou Smith. 

Lieutenant, George Dewey. 

Surgeon, Piobert T. Maccoun. 

Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Shively. 

Paymaster, T. M. Taylor. 

Chief Engineer, William H. Rutherford. 

MarineOtficer: Captain, P. H.W. Foutain^. 

Acting Masters, Frederick T. lung, George 

Munday, Charles F. Chase, Robert L. 

Kelly, and F. E. Ellis. 
Ensigns, A. S. Barker, 0. A. Batchcller, 

and Edwin M. Shepard. 
First Assistant Engineer, G. B. N. Towers. 
Second Assistant Engineer, J. Cox Hull. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Frederick G. 

McKean, Samuel R. Brooks, James J. 

Noble, and Henry W. Phillips. 
Acting Master's Mate, Henry B. Francis. 
Boatswain, Joseph Lewis. 
Gunner, William Cope. 
Carpenter, John Green. 

STEAM-SLOOP VAKUNA. 

Commander, Charles S. Boggs. 
Lieutenant, C. H. Swasey. 
Aoting Assistant Surgeon, W. G. Bruce. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles T. 

Filch. 
Acting Masters, Ezra Leonard, John D. 

Childs, aud David H. Hayden. 
Aoting First Assistant Engineer, Robert 

Henry. 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 



329 



Acting Second Assistant Engineer, James 
Shultz. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, E. C. 
Mayloy, Samuel Robinson, and George L. 
Harris. 

Acting Gunner, Tliomas H. Forturn. 

Acting Master's Mates, Thomas H. Law- 
rence, Silas H. Bevins, Henry D. Foster, 
and James L. Blauvelt. 

Captain's Clerk, E. B. Deshler. 

STEAM-SLOOP IKOQCOIS. 

Commander, John De Camp. 
Lieutenant, David B. Harmony. 
Lieutenant, Frederick U. McNair. 
Surgeon, Benjamin Vreeland. 
Paymaster, Robert A. Clark. 
Acting Masters, John F. Harden and John 

McFarland. 
First Assistant Engineer, in charge, John 

H. Long. 
Second Assistant Engineers, Benjamin C. 

Bampton, E. S. Boyu(on, Franklin K. 

Hain, and John H. Hunt. 
Carpenter, John A. Dixon. 
Acting Gunner, William Ptyder. 
Paymaster's Clerk, William P. Forman. 
Master's Mate, Charles F. Willard. 

STE.iM-SLOOP EICHMOND. 

Commander, James Alden. 

Lieutenants, A. Boyd Cummings and Ed- 
ward Terry. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Thomas F. 
Wade. 

Paymaster, George F. Cutter. 

Surgeon, A. A. Henderson. 

Captain of Marines, Alan P^amsay. 

Assistant Surgeon, John D. Murphy. 

Chief Engineer, John W. Moore. 

Acting Masters, Frederick S. Hill, S. B. 
Coggeshale, and Charles J. Gihbs. 

First Assistant Engineer, Eben Iloyt, Jr. 

Second Assistant Engineer, J. L. Butler. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Albert W. Mar- 
ley, G. W. W. Dove, R. B. Piotts, and 
Charles E. Emery. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, Charles 
J. Cooper. 

Acting Blaster's Mates, H F. Moffatt, J. 
Russell Howell, William R. Cox, John B. 
Bradley and Robert P. Swann. 

STEAMEE SOIOTA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Edward Donald- 
son. 

Lieutenant, Henry A. Adams. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. F. McSherry. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Chas. H. Lock- 
wood. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Charles E. De 
VaUn. 



Acting Masters, A. McFarland and Graham 
P. Foster. 

Acting Master's Males, John H. Field, Gra- 
ham C. Taylor, John II. Staples, and S. 
J. Hazazar. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Ediv. Curtis, 
A. H. Price, and H. M. Quigg. 

Captain's Clerk, J. li. ReifenyJer. 

STEAMEE, KATAHDIN. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Geo. H. Preble. 

Lieutenant, Nathaniel Green. 

Assistant Surgeon, Somerset Robinson. 

Acting Paymaster, R. F. Ladd. 

Acting Masters, George Harris and W. II. 
PoUeys. 

Second Assistant Engineer, T. M. Duke- 
hart. 

Third Assistant Engineers, F. A. R. George, 
William P. Keid, and William W. Heaton. 

Acting Master's Mates, George Lemard, J. 
W. Hartshorn, J. W. Thode, and A. 
Whiting. 

Captain's Clerk, Edward P. Preble. 

STEAMER WINONA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, E. T. Nichols. 
Lieutenant, John G. Walker. 
Assistant Surgeon, Arthur Matbewson. 
Paymaster, Henry M. Denniston. 
Acting Masters, Charles Ilallet and Felix 

McCurley. 
Second Assistant Engineer, Jas.P. Sprague. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Joseph Walters, 

Edward Gay, and Robert F. Hatfield. 
Acting Master's Mates, William F. Hunt, 

Alfred Staieg, Frank II. Beers, and 

Charles D. Hammett, Jr. 
Captain's Clerk, A. F. 0. Neil. 

STEAMER ITASCA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, C. H. B. Cald- 
well. 

Lieutenant, George Bacon. 

Assistant Surgeon, Heber Smith. 

Assistant Paymaster, Arthur J. Pritchard. 

Acting Masters, Edmund Jones and Amos 
Johnson. 

Third AssistantEngineers, James JI. Benok- 
ert, Truman Jones, John Borthwick, 
and Henry E. Henshaw. 

Acting Master's Matei, William E. Bridges, 
Neil Alexander, George Spencer, and 
Joseph B. Crane. 

Captain's Clerk, Fitz Henry Price. 

STEAMER CAYUGA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Napoleon B. Har- 
rison. 
Lieutenant, George H. Perkins. 
Assistant Surgeon, Edward S. Boget. 



330 



WEST GULP SQUADEON. 



Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. W. WhifSn. 
Acting Masters, Thomas H. Mortore and 

E. D. Perey- 
Captain's Clerk, Charles M. Burns. 
Second Assistant Engineer, George W. 

Rogers. 
Third Assistant Engineers, Ralph Aston, 

J. W. Sydney, and J. C. Chaffee 
Acting Master's Mates, James Gillin, 

Charles Post, Theodore B. Magee, and 

Robert C. Bostwick. 

STEAJIEE PINOLA. 

Lientenant-Commanding, Peiree Crosby. 

Lieutenant, A. P. Cooke. 

Assistant Surgeon, Luther M. Lyon. 

Assistant Paymaster, C. S. Warren. 

Acting Masters, William P. Gibbs and John 
G. Lloyd. 

First Assistant Engineer, John Johnson. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Peter A. Sasse, 
William F. Law, and John Everding. 

Acting Master's Mates, William H. Thomp- 
son, William C. White, and Charles V. 
Eamuel. 

STEAMER -WISSAHIOKON. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, A. N. Smith. 

Lieutenant, Edward E. Potter. 

Acting Masters, George Fernig, E. Price 
Walter, and B. G. Handy. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. Aokley. 

Assistant Paymaster, F. C. Upton. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Thomas S. Cun- 
ningham. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Augustus Mitch- 
ell and Philip H. White. 

Acting Master's Mates, Charley M. Bird, 
Inmez M. Forsyth, and 0. L. S. Roberts. 

STEAMER KINEO. 

Lieutenant- Commanding, George M. Ran- 
som. 
Lieutenant A. S. JIackenzie. 
Assistant Surgeon, A. S. Oberly. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Henry W. 

Dinian. 
Acting Masters, Oliver Colburn and L. A. 

Brown. 
Second Assistant Engineer, S. Wilkins 

Cragg. 
Third Assistant Engineers, James Maugh- 

lin, C. F. Hollingsworth, and C. J. Mc- 

Connell. 
Acting Master's Mates, William S. Keen, 

John Bartol, Jr., Walter H. Davis, and 

George A. Faunoe. 

STEA3IER KENNEBEC. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, John H. Russell. 
Lieutenant, T. B. Blake. 



Acting Masters, Henry C. Wade and Wil- 
liam Brooks. 

Assistant Surgeon, Charles H. Perry. 

Acting Assistant-Paymaster, C. L. Burnet. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Henry W. 
Fitch. 

Third Assistant Engineers, B. C. Girving, 
L. W. Bobinson, and E. E. Roberts. 

Acting Master's Mates, H. E. Tulkham, J. 
W. Merryman, J. W. Page, and J. D. 
Ellis. 

Captain's Clerk, George P. Levering. 



STEAMER HARRIET LANE. 

Commander, D. D. Porter, (Commanding 

Mortar Flotilla.) 
Lieutenant-Commanding, J. M.Wainwright. 
Lieutenant, Edward Lea. 
Acting Masters, J. A. Hannum, W. F. 

Monroe, and C. H. Hamilton. 
Assistant Paymaster, R. I. Richardson. 
Assistant Surgeon, T. N. Penrose. 
Second Assistant Engineers, M.H. Plunkett 

and C. H. Stone. 
Third Assistant Eneineers, J. E. Cooper, 

A. T. E. Mullin, and Robert N. Ellis. 
Acting Master's Mate, C. M. Davis. 
Captain's Clerk, John B. Norris. 

STEAMER WESIEIELD. 

Commander, William B. Renshaw. 

Acting Masters, C. W. Zimmerman, L. D. 

Smalley, F. C. Miller, Gustav Vassallo, 

and Joseph H. Warren. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, E. H. Allis. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles C. 

Walden. 
Second Assistant Engineer, William R. 

Greene. 
Third AssislantEngineers, George S.Baker, 

Charles W. Smith, and John Tan Hogan. 
Acting Midshipman, Stephen A. McCiirty. 
Master's Mates, David Harvey, .John P. 

Arnette, and William L. Baboock. 
Captain's Clerk, Dudley S. Griffith. 

STEAMER MIAMI. 

Lieutenant-Commander, A. D. Harrell. 

Acting Lieutenant, Robert Towusend. 

Acting Masters, William N. Wells, Milford 
Rogers, and John Lear. 

Assistant Surgeon, David Kindleberger. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, William H. 
Sells. 

First Assistant Engineer, Jnmes F. Lamdin. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, L. W. 
Simonds. 

Third Assistant Engineers, Guy Sampson, 
Henry D. Heisner, and Charles C. Davis. 

Acting Master's Mates, John Quevedo, Wil- 
liam H. Harrison, and Robert Eouudtree. 

Captain's Clerk, William C. Fay. 



WEST GULF SQUADKON. 



331 



STEAMER J. P. JACKSON. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Selim A. Wood- 
■worth. 

Surgeon, Thomas S. Yard. 

Pajmaster, A. D. Weld. 

Acting Masters, Stephen D. Jay, Charles 
G. Arthur, and Miner B. Crowell. 

Master's Mates, Jeremiah Murphy, William 
H. Howard, and Albert B. Axtell. 

Second Assistant Engineer, John B. Mor- 
gan. 

Third Assistant Engineers, James Barnes, 
Samuel Strude, and James D. Cadwell. 

Captain's Clerk, M. W. Whitlook. 

MOETAE SOHOONEE KOKFOLK PACKET. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Watson Smith. 
Assistant Surgeon, A. 6. Judson. 
Acting Master's Mates, W. E. H. Fentress, 
William Collins, and John Bath. 

MOKTAB. SCHOONEB T. A. WARD. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Walter W. Queen. 
Assistant Surgeon, A. A. Hoehling. 
Acting Master's Mates, William Hatch, 
George W. Wood, and James McDonald. 
Captain's Clerk, Archer Tein. 

MORTAR SCHOONER HORACE BEALLS. 

Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breese. 
Acting Master, George W. Snmner. 
Assistant Surgeon, R. T. Edes. 
Acting Master's Mates, James Becker, Wil- 
liam G. Morris, and Thomas H. Baker. 
Captains Clerk, Albert W. Bacon. 

STEAMER OLIETON. 

Acting Lieutenant-Commanding, C.H.Bald- 
win. 

Acting Masters, Rob't. Rhodes, B. S. Weeks, 
and E. A. Howell. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, D. D. T. Nestell. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, James Wing. 

Midshipmen, Hayden T. French and H. B. 
Rumsey. 

Acting Alaster's Mates, William W. Weld, 
Charles Albert, and Loring Cannon. 

Acting Secnnd Assistant Engineer, James 
A. Fox. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, S. S. 
Vollum, L. Spanburgh, and P. Finnigau. 

Captain's Clerk, S. M. Taylor. 

BARK HOUGHTON. 

Acting Master Commanding, Newell Gra- 
ham. 

Acting Master's Mates, George R. Clifton 
and Theron W. Squires. 

Assistani, Paymaster, Clifton Hellen. 

Paymaster's Clerk, Henry Gushing. 



MORTAR SCHOONER HENET JANES. 

Acting Master Commanding, Lewis W. 

Pennington. 
Acting Master's Mates, Anthony Soper, Z. 

Predmore, and R. W. Spates. 

MORTAR SCHOONER WILLIAM BACON. 

Acting Master Commanding, William P. 
Rogen. 

Acting Master's Mates, Charles D Thomp- 
son, George W. Law, and Htnry E. 
Ripley. 

MORTAR SCHOONER SEA POAM. 

Acting Master Commanding, Henry E. 

Williams. 
Acting Master's Mates, James Perkins, 

Joseph Moss, and Ambrose Felix. 

MORTAR SCHOONER PARA. 

Acting Master Commanding, E. G. Furber. 
Acting Master's Mates, Edward Ryan, John 
Mofionough, and W. W. Hughes. 

MORTAR SCHOONER GEORGE MANGIIAM. 

Acting Master Commanding, .John Collins. 
Acting Master's Mates, Samuel A. O'Brien, 

John M. I^hards, William H. Pade, and 

John WiilSms. 

MORTAR SCHOONER SARAH EEUEN. 

Acting Master Commanding, Abraham 

Christian. 
Acting Master's Mates, Niles C. Rider, 

James S. Hyde, and Sylvester Rowland. 

MORTAR SCHOONER RACER. 

Acting Master, Commanding, Alviu Phin- 

ney. 
Acting Master's Mates, Everett S. Manler, 

Henry C. Whitmore, and David B. Cosey. 

MORTAR SCHOONER O. H. LEE. 

Acting Master Commanding, Washington 
Godfrey. 

Acting Master's Mates, Joseph H. Chad- 
wick, Arthur T. Parsons, and Thomas 
G. Hall. 

MORTAR SCHOONER DAN SMITH. 

Acting Master's Mates, George W. Brown, 
Francis W. Towne, Erich Gabrielson, and 
R. S. Sommers. 



MORTAR BCHOONEE ADOLPH HCGEL. 

Acting Master Commanding, James Van 

Boskirk. 
Acting Master's Mates, Peter Decker and 

W. H. Thompson. 



332 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 



MORTAE SCHOOHEE MAEIA J. CARLTON. 

Acting Master Commanding, Charles E. 

Jack. 
Acting Master's "Mates, August Adler, 

Douglas P. O'Brien, and Gerome B. 

Jolinson. 

MORTAR SCHOONER SYDNEY C. JONES. 

Acting Master Commanding, James D. 

Graham. 
Acting Master's Mates, R. W. Wagstaff, W. 

C. Graham and J. W. Cortelyou. 

MOKTAR SCHOONER SOPHRONIA. 

Acting Master Commanding, Lyman Bar- 
tholomew. 

Acting Masler's Mates, E. W. Pelton and 
Andrew F. Williamson. 

MORTAR SCHOONER MATTHEW VASSAE. 

Acting Master Commanding, Hugh H. 
Savage. 

Acting Mister's Mates, William H. Pen- 
field, Darid H. Greswold, and George S. 
Hines. 

MORTAR SCHOONER C. P. WILLIAMS. 

Acting Master Commanding, A. R. Lang- 
thoa. 



Acting Master's Mates, John K. Fegan, 
William Cowlings, and George C. Pen- 
field. 

MORTAR SOHOONEE J. GRIFFITH. 

Actjag Master Commanding, Henry Brown. 
Acting Master's Mates, R. M. Clark and 
Thomas Lavensaler. 

MOETAK SCHOONER ORVETTA. 

Acting Master Commanding, Francis E. 

Blanchard. 
Acting Master's Mates, Enos 0. Adams, 

Sanford Randall, and William Munro. 

MORTAE. SCHOONER AKLETTA. 

Acting Master Commanding, Thomas E. 

Smith. 
Acting Master's Mates, Israel S. Bunce, 

Sylvim W. Fetchelt, and Thomas Devine. 

COAST SUKVEY STEA3IEE SACHEM. 

Assistant Commanding, F. H. Gerdes. 
Assistants, J. G. Ottmans, James Harris, 

and Richard D. Halter. 
Aid, Thomas Bowie. 
Sailing Master, Thomas A. Sears. 
Mates, Eben. Johnson, W. H. Shriyely, W. 

Thompson, and J. Duffy. 



BATTLE OF MOBILE BAT, AUGUST 5, 18G4. 



STEAM-SLOOP HARTFORD, (Flag-ship.) 

Rear Admiral, David G. Farragut. 
Fleet Captain, Percival Drayton. 
Lieutenant-Commander, Lewis A. Kimberly. 
Lieutenants, J. Crittenden Watson, A. R. 

Yates, Herbert E. Tyson, and La Rue P. 

Adams. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Geo. Mundy. 
Fleet Surgeon, J. C. Palmer. 
Fleet Paymaster, Edward T. Dunn. 
Fleet Engineer, William H. Shook. 
Surgeon, Philip Lansdale. 
Assistant Surgeons, William Commons and 

F. Woolverton. 
Paymaster, William F. Meredith. 
Chief Engineer, Thomas Williamson. 
Captain MKrines, Charles Heywood. 
Rear Admiral's Secretary, Alexander Mo- 

Kinley. 
Acting Ensigns, G. E. D. Glidden, William 

H. Wliiling, H. H. Brownell, H. II. 

Heg.inboth,am, Robert D. Bogart, and Wil- 
liam L. Dana, 
First Assistant Engineer, Edward B. Latch. 



Second Assistant Engineers, John Wilson, 
Isaac De Grafi', and H. L. Pelkington. 

Third Assistant Engineer, Jas. E. Speights. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, William 
McEwan, T. Benton Brown, and John 
D. Thompson. 

P.iymast,er'3 Clerk, Horatio N. Wood. 

Acting Master's Mates, Piiohard P. Herrick, 
George B. Avery, William H. llathorne, 
William H. Childs, and Joseph J. Fi- 
nelli. 

STEAM-SLOOP RICHMOND. 

Captain, Thornton A. Jenkins. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Edward Terry. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Charles J. 
Gibbs. 

Surgeon, Lewis J. Williams. 

Assistant Surgeon, J. MoD. PJce. 

Paymaster, Edwin Stewart. 

Chief Engineer, Jackson McElmell. 

Second Lieutenant Marines, C. L, Sher- 
man. ' 

Acting Master, Prince S. Borden. 

Ensign, Phillip H. Cooper. 



■WEST GULP SQUADRON. 



333 



Acting Ensigns, Lewis Clark, Colby M. 
Chester, and Arthur H. Wright. 

First Assistant Engineer, Emory J. Brooks. 

Second Assistant Engineers, Albert J. Ken- 
yon, Absalom Kirby, John D. Ford, and 
Robert Weir. 

Third Assistant Engineers, William II. 
Cra-wford, Charles W.C. Barter, James W. 
Patterson, and Thomas McElmell. 

Acting Master's Mates, James West, Theo- 
dore J. Werner, William C. Seymour, and 
Walter A. DeWitt. 

Pilot, William Stewart. 

STEAM-SLOOP LACK.4.WANNA. 

Captain, J. B. Marchand. 

Lieutenants, Thomas S. Spencer and S. A. 

MoCarty. 
Paymaster, James Fulton. 
Surgeon, T. W. Leach. »-- 

Acting Assistant Burgeon, W. T. Hutchin- 
son. 
Acting Masters, Felix McCurley and John 

H. Allen. 
Ensigns, G. H. Wadleigh and Frank Wildes. 
Acting Ensign, Clarence Rathbone. 
First Assistant Engineer, James W. Whit- 

aker. 
Second Assistant Engineers, E. J. Whit- 

aker and George W. Roche. 
Third Assistant Engineer, Isaac B. F^t. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, David 

Hennessy and George W. Sullivan. 
Acting Master's Mates, William J. Lewis, 

C. H. Foster, and John C. Palmer. 

STEAJI-SLOOP BEOOKLTN. 

Captain, James Alden. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Edward P. Lull. 

Lieutenants, Thomas L. Swanu and Charles 
F. Blake. 

Surgeon, George Maulsby. 

Assistant Surgeon, H. Smith. 

Paymaster, Gilbert E. Thornton. 

Chief Engineer, Mortimer Kellogg. 

Ensigns, Charles H. Pendleton and C. D. 
Sigsbee. 

Acting Ensigns, John Atter and D. R. Cas- 
sel. 

Second Assistant Engineers, John D. Top- 
pin, David Hardie, Haviland Barstow, 
and George E. Tower. 

Third Assistant Engineers, F. C. Goodwin, 
Joel A. BuUard, and William H. De Hart. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, Henry 
H. Arthur. 

Acting Master's Mates, Frederick C. Dun- 
can, A. L. Stevens, and William H. Cook. 

MONITOE TEOUMSEH. 

Commander, T. Augustus Craven. 
Lieutenant, John W. Kelly. 



Acting Masters, Charles F. Langley and 
Gardner Cottrell. 

Acting Ensigns, John P. Lettic and Wil- 
liam Titoomb. 

Chief Engineer, C. Faron. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, William A. Dan- 
ker. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, George Worke. 

Second Assistant Engineers, F. S. Barlow 
and Henry S. Leonard. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, T. Us- 
tick. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, George 
Belter and James L. Parsons. 

STEAM-SLOOP MONONGAHELA. 

Commander, James H. Strong. 

Lieutenants, Roderick Prentiss and 0. A. 
Batchenor. 

Surgeon, David Kindleberger. 

Acting AssistantSurgeon, William B. Lewis. 

Assistant Paymaster, Forbes Parker. 

Chief Engineer, George E. Kutz. 

Acting Ensigns, D. W. Mullan, James H. 
Rodgers, George Gerrard, and P. E. Har- 
rington. 

Second Assistant Engineers, Joseph Trilley, 
J. J. Bissett, Edward Cheney, and Philip 
J. Langer. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, Amos C. 
Wilcox. 

STEAM-SLOOP OSSIPEE. 

Commander, William E. Le Roy. 
Lieutenants, J. A. Howell and Richard S. 

Chew. 
Surgeon, B. F. Gibbs. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Jon. K. Bacon. 
Paymaster, Edward Foster. 
Acting Chief Engineer, James M. Adams. 
Acting Masters, C. C. Bunker and C. W. 

Adams. 
Acting Ensigns, Charles E. Clark, Henry 

S. Lambert, and William A. Van Vleck. 
Second Assistant Engineer, V/illiam H. 

Vanderbilt. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers, Martin 

H. Gerry, James R. Webb, George W. 

Kidder, and Alfred Colin. 
Third Assistant Engineer, John Matthews. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, William 

Collier. 
Acting Master's Mates, George Pilling and 

William Merigood. 
Assistant Gunner, John Q. Adams. 

STEAM-SIiOOP ONEIDA. 

Commander, J. R, Madison Mullany. 

Lieutenants, Charles L. Huntington, 
Charles S. Cotton, and Edward N. Kel- 
logg. 

Surgeon, John Y. Taylor. 



334 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 



Acting Paymaster, George R. Martin. 
Chief Engineer, William H. Hunt. 
Ensign, Charles V. Gridley. 
Acting Ensigns, John L. Hall-and John 

Sears. 
First Assistant Engineer, Reuben H. Fitch. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, W. E. 

Deaver and Nicholas Dillon. 
Acting Master's Mates, Edward Bird, Daniel 

Clark, and John Devereaux. 
Pilot, John V. Grlvet. 

bteaM-sloop semiholb. 

Commander, Edward Donaldson. 

Surgeon, John I. Gibson. 

Paymaster, Levi J. Stookwell. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, John A. John- 
ston. 

Acting Master, William A. Marine. 

Acting Ensigns, Francis Kempton, Walter S. 
Church, and David K. Perkins. 

Acting First Assistant Engineers, Claude 
Babcock and Alvin R. Calden. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, William 
Driukwater, Patrick I. Hughes, and Wil- 
liam H. Whiting. 

Acting Master's Mates, C. A. Thome and 
Henry Webb. 

lEON CLAD WINNEBAGO. 

Commander, Thomas H. Stevens. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, William F. 

Shankland. 
Acting Master, Austrony S. Megathliu. 
Acting Ensigns, James Whitworth, Michael 

Murphy, and John Morrisey. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Henry Ger- 

rard. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Joseph G. Bell. 
Acting Chief Engineer, Simon Sohultice. 
First Assistant Engineer, John Purdy. 
Acting First Assistant Engineers, James 

Monroe and John Wilson. ■ 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers, E. L. 

Morse and Philip Allman. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Robert 

D. Wright, James W. Quinn, James Mor- 
ris, and Thomas J. Myers. 
Acting Master's Mates, Henry C. Atter, 

JohnL. HaU, William Edgar, and Charles 

S. Lyons. 
Acting Gunner, Robert Sherman. 

MONITOB. MANHATTAN. 

Commander, J. W. A. Nicholson. 
Lieutenant, E. M. Schoonmaker. 
Acting Master, Robert B. Ely. 
Acting Chief Engineer, C. L. Carty. 
Assistant Surgeon, John H. Austin. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, H. G. Thayer. 
Acting Ensigns, John B. Trott, George B. 
Mott, and Peter France. 



Acting First Assistant Engineer, William 

H. Miller. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers, James 

B. Farrand and Thomas Fiunie. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Edward 

Misset, Charles F. Stroud, and Harrie 

Webster. 

STEAMEE GALENA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Clark H. Welles. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Charles W. 

Wilson. 
Acting Master, D. W. C. Kells. 
First Assistant Engineer, William G. Bueh- 

ler. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Theodore 

Kitchen. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, George P. Wright. 
Acting Ensigns, Henry Pease, Jr., and 

Sanford S. Miner. 
Second Assistant Engineers, Charles H. 

Greenleaf and John A. Soot. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Patrick 

Burns and William Weloker. 
Acting Master's Mates, Francis Tuttle and 

James H. Delano. 

STEAMEE OONBMAUGH. 

Lieutenant-Commander, J. C. P.DeKralTt. 

Acting Masters, J. W. Stapleford and James 
F. Alcorn. 

Assistant Surgeon, J. J. AUingham. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. E. Taylor. 

Acting Ensigns, William A. Byrnes, J. D. 
Hademan, and William F. Dolliver. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, A. Lapoint. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineers, P. H. 
Kendricken and Robert Whitehill. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, J. P. 
Knowlton and Thomas Kidd. 

Acting Master's Mates, John Bowman, 
John E. Myttinger, and William Camp- 
bell. 

STEAMER PORT EOTAL. 

Lieutenant-Commanders, Bancroft Gher- 

ardi and Thomas C. Bowen. 
Acting Masters, Edward Herrick and 

Thomas M. Gardner. 
Acting A.ssistant Surgeon, Edward R. 

Hutchins. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Frank K. 

Moore. 
Acting Ensigns, William Hull and Fortes- 

que S. Hopkins. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Fletcher 

A. Wilson. 
Second Assistant Engineers, Francis B. Al- 
len and Henry Snyder. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, John B. 

McGavern. 
Third Assistant Engineer, W. C. F. Keichen- 

buck. 



WEST GULP SQUADRON. 



335 



Acting Muster's Mates, Eugene V. Tyson, 
Henry D. Baldwin, William A. Presoott, 
and Samuel S. Bumpus. 

STEAMEK METAOOMET. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James E. Jouett. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Henry J. 
Sleeper. 

Acting Masters, N. M. Dyer and John 0. 
Morse. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, E. D. Payne. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, H. M. Ham- 
man. 

Acting Ensigns, George E. Wing, John 
White, and Henry C. Nields. 

First Assistant Engineer, James Atkins. 

Second Assistant Engineer, George P. Hunt. 

Third Assistant Engineers, George B. Rodg- 
ers, James H. Nash, and D. W. King. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. K. Goodwin and 
Rufus N. Miller. 

Pilot, John H. CoUins. 

STEAMEE OCTOEAKA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Charles H. Greene. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, William D, 

Urann. 
Acting Masters, H. S. Young and Henry R. 

Billings. 
Assistant Surgeon, Edward R. Dodge. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Joseph H. 

Pyuehon. 
Acting Ensign, George H. Dodge. 
Acting First Assistant Engineers, William 

W. Shipman and M. N. McEntee. 
Second Assistant Eugiaeer, Rozeau B. 

Plotts. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Jarol 

Huber. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Joseph 

Knight and Gustar W. Best. 
Acting Master's Mates, George P. GifFord 

and George W. Adams. 

STEAMER EEKKEBEC. 

Lieutenant-Commander, William P. Mc- 
Cann. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Edward Ba- 
ker. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Edward T. 
Barker. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, George W. Hatch. 

Acting Ensigns, John J. Butler, Hosea E. 
Tinkham, and Joseph D. Ellis. 

Second Assist't Engineers, Lewis W. Robin- 
son and John S. Pearce. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, James 
Eccles. 

STEAMER 8EBAG0. 

Lieutenant-Commander, William E. Fitz- 
hugh. 



Acting Master, Jerome B. Rogers. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, T. Munson Coan. 
Assistant Paymaster, Henry A. Strong.' 
Acting Ensigns, Charles B. Dorrance, E. 

D. Martin, and Samuel G. Elood. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, William 

Morris. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, W. P. 

Agers. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Robert 

Miller, Bernard Kerby, and Franklin 

Babcock. 
Acting Master's Mates, Thomas EUsmon 

and Ephraim R. Foster. 

STEAMER PINOLA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Oscar P. Stanton. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, A. B. Robin- 
son. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, A. T. Hanson. 

Acting Ensigns, Charles V. Rummell, 
James W. Brown, William Symonds, and 
Albion P. Gibbs. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Howard D. 
Potts. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Samuel 
A. Appold, Philip Ketler, Francis E. Haa- 
mer, and Patrick H. Friel. 

Acting Master's Mate, John Rosling. 

STEAMER ITASCA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, George Brown. 

Acting Master, Richard Hustace. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Alfred G. La- 
throp. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Henry Brock- 
wood. 

Acting Ensigns, Charles H. Hurd, James 
Igo, and Edward S. Lowe. 

Second Assistant Engineers, John Borth- 
wiok and George C. Irelan. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Charles 
A. Laws and Alfred Hoyt. 

Acting Master's Mates, L. E. Heath and 
Marcus Chapman. 

STEAMER PEMBINA. 

Leutenant-Commander, J. G. Maxwell. 

Acting Master, Bowen Allen. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, A. R. Holmes. 

Acting Paymaster, Walter Fuller. 

Acting Ensigns, William Lyddon, Braddock 

M. Chester, Charles Putnam, and Charles 

L. Crandall. 
Second Assistant Engineers, James W. 

Sydney and Richard M. Hodgson. 
Third Assistant Engineer, Charles F. Nagle. 
Acting Master's Mates, Henry T. Davis. 

MONITOR CHICKASAW. 

Lieutenant-Commander, George H. Per- 
kins. 



336 



WEST GULF SQUADRON. 



Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Wm. Hamil- 
ton. 
Acting Masters, Ezekiel D. Percy and E. 

B. Pike. 
Acting Chief Engineer, William Ptodgers. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Edmund S. 

Wheeler. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Garrett D. Buck- 

ner. 
Acting Ensigns, George L. Jorden and J. 

Louis Harris. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Charles 

Chadwick. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers. Elisha 

P. Bartlett, James J. Maratta, and Thomas 

H. Nelson. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Albert 

H. Goff, Sarin Whitehead, Alexander H. 

Wiggins, Alfred Wilkinson, Henry Duck- 

■worth, and George Harris. 
Acting Master's Mates, Allen A. Mann, M. 

F. Kershaw, M. G. Jones, and F. A. Case. 
Gunner, John A. Macdonald. 

STEAMEE. J. p. JACKSON. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, S. W. Pen- 
nington. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Thomas S. Yard. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles B. 

Perry. 
Acting Ensigns, Robert Henderson, William 

H. Howard, and Joseph H. Wainwright. 
Acting Seound Assistant Engineer, Charles 

Goodwin. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, James 

D. Cadwell, Albert Mayer, John E. 

Hease, and L. K. Burgoyne. 
Acting JIaster's Mates, Achilles Kalinski 

and Charles Heath. 

STEAMER COWSLIP. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Charles G. 
Arthur. 

Acting Ensign, John Dennet. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Benja- 
min S. Cook. 

Acting Thu-d Assistant Engineer, John 
Miller. 

Acting Master's Mate, Jacob Teal. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, J. R. 
Davidson. 

Acting Master's Mates, Frederick A. Grass, 
Jr., and J, P. Canfield. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, John 
Rogers. 

Acting Master, William T. Bacon. 

STEAMER STOOKDALE. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Thomas Ed- 
wards. 
Acting Master, Spiro V. Beunis. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, John W. Day. 



Acting- Second Assistant Engineer, Alex- 
ander M. Geary. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineers, William 
Cpomwell and Ambrose Kimball. 

Acting Master's Mates, Frederick H. John- 
son, Charles H. Cleveland, and Daniel 
Dennis. 

STEAMER ETJOKTHORN. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding, 
Washington Godfrey. 

Acting Master's Mates, Benjamin F. Robin- 
son, Henry J. Wyned, and Henry A. 
Mayo. 

Aolfing Second Assistant Ei-jineer, Robert 
A. Copeland. 

Acting 'Third Assistant Engineers, Edward 
R. Hubbard and Alfred 0. Tildeu. 

STEAMER GENESSEE. 

Acting Master, George E. Nelson. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles H. 

Lockwood. 
Assistant Surgeon, Francis H. Atkins. 
Acting Ensign, William F. Bacon. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, David 

Frazier. 
Second Assistant Engineers, F. D. Stewart 

and Thomas Fitzgerald. 
Acting Third Assistant Ens:ineers, George 

W. Kiersted and Thomas Campbell. 
Acting Master's Males, H. E. Giraud and 

A. H. Morgan. 

STEAMER GLASGOW. 

Acting Master, Richard J. HofTner. 

Acting Ensign, Charles Welles. 

Second Assistant Engineer, John F. Bing- 
ham. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Robert 
S. Lytle. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, John Mc- 
Autiffe. 

Acting Aiaster's Mates, John F. Baker and 
William Jones. 

STEAMER ESTRELLA. 

Acting Master, G. P. Pomeroy. 

Acting Ensign, W. W. Duley. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Kinney. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Peter H. 

Taws. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Robert G. 

Pope. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, George 

R. Slarble and James F. Winters. 
Acting Master's Mates, E. G. Caswell and 

F. A. Sherman. 

STEAMER NARCISSTTS. 

Acting Ensign, William G. Jones. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON 



337 



Acting Third Assistant Engineers, John L. 
Young and William Pancake. 



Acting Master's Mates, Charles B. Marple 
and Edward A. Mooree. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



CAPTURE OP FORT HENRY, FEBRUARY, 6, 1862. 



GUNBOAT CINCINNATI. 

Flag-officer, A. H. Foote. 

Commander, R. N. Stemble. 

Acting Masters, William E. Hoel, Oscar H. 
Pratt, Charles G. Perkins, and John 
Pearoo. 

Surgeon, John Ludlow. 

Paymaster, Baron Proctor. 

Chief Engineer, William D. McParland. 

First Assistant Engineer, Samuel H. Love- 
joy- 

Second Assistant Engineer, James Arm- 
strong. 

Third Assistant Engineer, William J. Shan- 
non. 

Master's Mates, James McB. Stembel and 
PhiKp Shell. 

PUots, K. H. Attenborough and Isaac D. 
G^augh. 

Acting Gunner, John R. Hall. 

Carpenter, Thomas B, Gregory. 

OUNBOAT CONESTOQA. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, S. L. Phelps. 

Acting Masters, John A. Duble, Charles P. 
Noble, Benjamin Sebastian, and Richard 
H. Cutter. _ _ 

Assistant Surgeon, William H.. Wilson. 

Acting Paymaster, Alfred Phelps. 

Chief Engineer, Thomas Cook. 

First Assistant Engineer, Alexander Magee. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Charles Mar- 
shall. 

Third Assistant Engineer, Michael Norton. 

Master's Mate, James Kearney. 

Pilots, Aaron M. Jordon and William Atten- 
borough. 

Acting Gunner, Henry Hamilton. 

Carpenter, Andrew Woodlook. 

aUNBOAT ESSEX. 

Commander, William D. Porter. 

Acting Masters, Robert K. Riley, James 

Laning, Theodore P. Ferry, and George 

W. Walker. 
22 



Surgeon, Thomas Rioe. 
Paymaster, Joseph H. Lewis. 
Chief Engineer, Charles M. Blaadell. 
First Assistant Engineer, R. J. Stearns. 
SScond Assistant Engineer, George D. 

Simms. 
Third Assistant Engineer, Jeremiah Wetzel. 
Master's Mate, S. B. Brittou. 
Pilots, James MoBride and Marshall H. 

Ford. 
Gunner, Matthias B. Snyder. 
Carpenter, Thomas Steel. ' 

GUNBOAT 1.BXINQT0N. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, James W. Shirk. 
Acting Masters, Jacob,, S. Hard, Martin 

Dunn, James Fitzpatriok, and Sylvester 

Poole. 
Assistant Surgeon, George W. Garver. 
Acting Paymaster, Augustus F. Taylor. 
Pilots, James McCamant and William Ford. 
Gunner, Samuel Vroom. 
Carpenter, Richard Carroll. 

GUNBOAT TTIBR. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, William Gwin. 

Acting Masters, Edw'dShaw, Jason Goudy, 
James Martin, and Patrick McCarty. 

Assistant Surgeon, Thomas H. Kearney. 

Acting Paymaster, William B. Coleman. 

Chief Engineer, Samuel Goble. 

First Assistant Engineer, D. Edward Wea- 
ver. 

Second Assistant Engineer, Edward W. 
Goble. 

Third Assistant Engineer, Oscar S. Davis. 

Master's Mate, Ferdinand T. Coleman. 

Pilots, John Sebastian and David Hiner. 

Acting Gunner, Herman Peters. 

Carpenter, Thomas Russell. 

GUNBOAT ST. LOUIS. 

Lieutenant-Commanding.Leonard Paulding. 
Acting Masters, John V. Johnson, James 

Y. Clemson, Charles S. Kendriok, and 

Alexander Fraser. 



838 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



Assistant Surgeon, John B. McDill. 

Acting Paymaster, Llewellyn Curry. 

Chief Engineer, William Carswell. 

First Assistant Engineer, T. P. Ackerman. 

Second Assistant Engineer, James L. Smith. 

Third Assistant Engineer, John Wilcoxsen. 

Master's Mates, Snyder H. McAdam and 
James P. Paulding. 

Pilots, Frank A. Riley and Robert G. Bald- 
win. 

Acting Gunner, John A. McDonald. 

Carpenter, Robert H. Medill. 

GtTNBOAT CAKONDELET. 

Commander, Henry Walke. 



Acting Masters, Richard M. Wade, John 

Doherty, Charles C. Gray, and Henry A. 

Walke. 
Assistant Surgeon, James S. MoNeely. 
Acting Paymaster, George J. ^V. Nexsen 
Chief Engineer, William 11. Faulkner. 
First Assistant Engineer, Chirles H. Caven, 
Second Assistant Engineer, Samuel S. 

Brooks. 
Third Assistant Engineer, Augustus F. 

Crowell. 
Master's Mates, Theodore L. Gillmore and 

Edward E. Brennand. 
Pilots, William Hinton and Daniel Weaver. 
Gunner, Richard Adams. 
Carpenter, Oliver Donaldson. 



CAPTURE OF MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE, JUNE 6, 1862. 



IRON-OIAD BENTON, (Flag-ship.) 

Flag-oflSoer, Charles H. Davis. 
Lieutenant-Commander, S. L. Phelps. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, S. Henriques. 
Acting Masters, George P. Lord and Oilman 

D. Groove. 
Acting Chief Engineer, Samuel W. Bosd- 

wick. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, William C. 

Bleakney. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineers, J. V. 

Starr, C. W. Ridgelew, Robert Long, and 

Oliver Brady. 
Pilots, Richard E. Buoh, Daniel T. Duffy, 

and Horace E. Bigsby. 

IBON-OLAD LOUISVILLE. 

Commander, Benjamin M. Dove. 

Assistant Surgeon, Abram M. Vail. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Lewis Jorgen- 
son. 

Acting Masters, R. H. Bandsman, T. M. 
Parker, S. C. Harrison, and R. L. Par- 
ker. 

Acting Chief Engineer, J. B. Fulton. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, A. W. 
Hardy. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, John C. 
Parkinson. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, D. Chapel. 

Acting Master's Mate, Charles L. Felters. 

Pilots, Samuel Williamson and Samuel Mo- 
Bride. 

IRON-CLAD OAaONDELET. 

Commander, Henry Walke. 
Assistant Surgeon, J. I. McNeiley. 



Acting Masters, Richard Wade, John Doher- 
ty, G. J. W. Nexsen, E. Morgan, and E. 
E. Brunnard. 

Acting Chief Engineer, William H. Faulkner. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, Charles H. 
Carson. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, A. T. 
Crowell. ^ 

Acting Master's Mates, J. S. GOlman and 
J. C. Gipson. 

Pilot, John Demming. 

inON-CLAD OAIEO. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, N. C. Bryant. 
Assistant Surgeon, Stephen Fass. 
Assistant Paymaster, W. B. Winslow. 
Acting Masters, Hiram R. Haslett, James 

C. Moore, John Seraney, and Thomas 

Burns . 
Acting Chief Engineer, John W. Hartnpee. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, John Man- 
ning. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, James 

Wilkins. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, George W. 

Aben. 
Acting Master's Mates, Daniel D. Bond 

and T. J. Jobson. 
Pilots, Oscar B. Jally and Thomas E. 

Young. 

IBON-CLAD ST. LOUIS. 

Lieutenant-Commanding, Wilson McGun- 

negle. 
Acting Masters, J. B. Johnston, C. J. Ken- 

dricks, Alexander Frazer, and Lewellyn 

P. Paulding. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



339 



Acting Chief Engineer, 'Williara Carswell. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Tiiomas 

T. Ackerman. 
Acting Second Assistalit Engineer, James 

L. Smilh. 



Acting Third Assistant Engineer, John S. 

Williamson. 
Acting Master's Mates, J. H. MoAdams. 
Pilot, R. G. Baldwin. 



PASSAGE OF THE VICKSBURG BATTERIES, APRIL 6, 1863. 



IK01f-OI.AD BENTON. 

Acting Rear Admiral, David D. Porter. 

Lieuteuani -Commander, James H. Greer. 

Acting Master, George P. Lord 

Assist am Surgeon, Newton L. Bates. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster,C. G. Lowndes. 

Acting Eusigns, J. F. Reed, C. H. Wright, 
J. M. Walker, and W. J. Lees. 

Acting Chiel Engineer, J. V. Starr. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, C.W. Fair- 
fowl. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Benja- 
min Hoffman. 

Acting Tlilrd Assistant Engineers, C. W. 
Kidgeley, Robert Long, and Oliver Brag. 

Acting Masier's Mates, E. 0. Brenner and 
William II. Lemassena. 

Gunner, N. B. Willitts. 

Acting Carpenter, Richard Blackford. 

IKON-CLAD LAFAYETTE. 

Captain, H. Walkc. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, James Lan- 

ning. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Collins D.AVhite. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, James P. 

Kelley. 
Acting Ensigns, James L. Moran, Elias 

Smith, and William C. Bennett. 
Acting First Assistant Engineers, Robert 

Tate and Albert M. Rowe. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Eben B. 

Hill and John W. Paull. 
Acting Master's Mates, H. C. Warren, C. 

H. Slooum, H. C. Mdrsh, S. 0. Lovell, S. 

B.. Winram, W. Higbee, Thomas Twiz- 

ohell, and Paul M. Morgan. 
Acting Gunner, G. W. Price. 
Acting Carpenter, C. M. Underwood. 

IKON-CLAD LOUISVILLE. 

Lieutenant-Commander, E. K. Owen. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, W. D. Hoffman. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Dudley L. 

Ruth. 
Acting Ensigns, Frank Bates, John T. 

Blockford, John G. Waters, and S. M. B. 

Seroose. 
Acting Chief Engineer, James B. Fulton. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Albert W. 

Hardy. 



Acting Second Assistant Engineer, Charles 

W. Reynolds. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineer, Charles 

Degleman 
Acting Master's Mate, Henry D. Coffen- 

berry. 
Acting Gunner, William Shields. 
Acting Carpenter, Davis H. Curry. 

IRON-CLAD inSCUMEIA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James W. Shirk. 
Acting Master, H F. Tayon. 
Assistant Paymaster, George H. Lyon. 
Acting Ensigns, T. M. Parrell, Lewis Kon- 

ney, and E. M. Clark. 
Acting Chief Engineer, John W. Hartupee. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Perry 

South. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, William 

J. Milligan. 

mON-CLAD MOUND CUT. 

Lieutenant, Byron Wilson. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Roland Cadwal- 

lader. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Benjamin L. 

Donahue. 
Acting Ensigns, James Martin, Frederick 

T. Coleman, Silas B. Coleman, and De- 
Wayne Stebbins. 
Acting Chief Engineer, Edward N. Merri- 

man. 
Acting First Assistant Engineer, Robert M. 

Gardiner. 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, H. M. 

Derby. 
Acting Third Assistant Engineers, Elihu 

Stephens and John N. Hartnett. 
Gunner, Herman Peters. 

IRON-CLAD PITTSBURG. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenants, William R. 

Iloel and J. C. Beniley. 
Acting Master, Charles Germain. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Henry M. Minor. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles H. 

Gould. 
Acting Ensigns, George W. Paulding and 

George W. Rogers. 
Acting Chief Engineer, Samuel B. Goble. 



340 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



Acting First Assistant Engineers, George 
H, Atkinson and James L. Auble. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer, William 
Mills. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, William 
H. Mitchell. 

Acting Gunner, Joseph Simons. 

mON-OLAD OARONDELET. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, J. McLeod 

Murphy. 
Acting Master, James C. Gipson. 



Assistnnt Surgeon, D. E. Bannon. 

Acdng Assistant Paymaster, L. C. Worden. 

Acting Ensigns, Oliver Donaldson, Scott D. 
Jordan, E. W. Miller, and T. A. Qaiun. 

Acting Chief Engineer, Charles H. Gavin. 

Acting First Assistant Engineer, George H. 
Atkinson. ■ ' 

Acting Second Assistant Engineers, M. Nor- 
ton and Walter B. Barton. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer, John Mo- 
Williams. 

Acting Carpenter, George W. Kenney. 



ENGAGEMENT WITH BATTEEIES AT GRAND GTJLF MISSISSIPPI, 
APRIL 29, 1863. 



IRON-CLAD STEAMEB. BENTON. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James A. Greer. 

Assistant Surgeon, N. L. Bates. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. G. Lowndes. 

Acting Masters, E. C. Breman, J. F. Reed, 
and N. B. Willetts. 

Acting Ensigns, William J. Lees, Henry S. 
O'Grady, and Peyton H. Randolph. 

Acting Master's Mates, William Kisner and 
Hiram Simonton. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Job Y. Starr; 
Acting First Assistant, Hector W. Fair- 
foul ; Acting Second Assistants, Oliver 
Bray and Alonzo A. Jenks ; Acting Third 
Assistant, Benjamin Farmer. 

Acting Carpenter, Richard Rockford. 

mON-CLAD STEAMEK LAFAYETTE. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James P. Foster. 

Acting Volunteer Lientenaut, Edward Mor- 
gan. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, D. H. Hayden. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, James P. 
Kelly. 

Acting Ensigns, John L. Bryant, Frederick 
G. Sampson, and James L. Moran. 

Acting Master's Mates, Paul Morgan, Wil- 
liam P. Higboe, Sturgis 0. Lovell, S. R. 
Winram, and Charles H. Slocum. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Robert Tate ; Act- 
ing First Assistant, James Wilkins ; Act- 
ing Second Assistant, John W. PauU; 
Acting Third Assistants, E. B. Hill and 
Max Pratt. 

Acting Gunner, George Price. 

Acting Carpenter, J. W. Lister. 

IRON-CLAD STEAIIEE LOUISVILLE, 

Lieutenant-Commander, Elias K. Owen. 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, Fayette Clapp. 



Acting Assistant Paymaster, D. L. Ruth. 

Acting Ensigns, Henry A. CofFenberry, 
Charles Nelson, Henry Harkins, George 
V. Mead, Robert II. Longlands, Frank 
Bates, and John T. Blackford. 

Acting Master's Mates, Jacob J. Drew, 
Charles Smith, Jr., and C. S. Scanlan. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, James B, Fulton; 
Acting First Assistant, J. J. Hardy ; Act- 
ing Second Assistant, C. W. Reynolds ; 
Acting Third Assistant, Charles F. Degel- 
man. 

Acting Gunner, William Shields. 

Acting Carpenter, D. H. Curry. 

IKON-CLAD STEAMER TUSCUMBIA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James W. Shirk. 
Assistant Paymaster, George A. Lyon. 
Acting Ensigns, Lewis Kenuey and E. M. 

Clark. 
Engineers : Acting Chief, John W. Hartu- 

pee ; Acting First Assistant, Perry South; 

Acting Second Assistant, William J. Mil- 

ligin. 

IKON-CLAD STEAMER MOUND CITT. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, A. R. Lang- 
thorn. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Rice. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, B. J. Douahoe. 

Acting Master, P. T. Coleman. 

Acting Ensigns; S. B. Coleman, D. Steb- 
bins, and W. H. Decker. 

Acting Master's Mate, Richard T. Lamport. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Edward Merri- 
man; Acting First Assistant, E. R. Clem- 
ens ; Acting Second Assistant, John M. 
Hartnetf ; Acting Third Assistants, George 
L. Baker and Richard Carter. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas H. Green. 

Acting Carpenter, Jerome Burns. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



341 



lEOU-OLAD STEAMEE PITTSBUKO. 

AotingVolunteer Lieutenant, W. R. Hoel. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, F. M. Follett. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. H. Gould. 

Acting Master, George W. Rogers. 

Acting Ensigns, Chas. N. Hall, Jas. Ovatt, 
Freeman Vincent, and George W. Garlick. 

Acting Master's Mates, Henry N. Wells, 
John Scott, and Charles B. Jones. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, S. B. Goble ; Act- 
ing First Assistant, Eli R. Pavy; Acting 
Second Assistants, William H. Mitchell 
and Julius EUiter. 

Acting Gunner, Frank C. Green. 

Acting Carpenter, Charles Poplar. 



IKON-CLAD STEAMEE OAEONDELET. 

Lieutenant-Commander, J. C. Mitchell. 

Asssistant Surgeon, D. R. Bannon. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. G. Worden. 

Acting Ensigns, Oliver Donaldson, Scott D. 
Jordan, E. W. Miller, and T. A. Quinn. 

Acting Master's Mates, Lauren W. Hastings 
and W. H. H. DeGroot. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Charles H. Gavin; 
Acting First Assistant, George H. Atkin- 
son ; Acting Second Assistants, M. Nor- 
ton and Walter B. Barton ; Acting Third 
Assistant, John MoWilliams. 

Acting Carpenter, George W. Kenney. 



RED RrVER EXPEDITION, MARCH AND APRIL, 1864. 



STEAMEK BLACK HAWK, (Flag-ship.) 

Rear Admiral, D. D. Porter. 
Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breese. 
Fleet Surgeon, Ninian Piukney. 
Assistant Surgeon, R'. T. Edes. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. H. Kirken- 

dall. 
Acting Ma iter, James Fitzpatrick. 
Ensigns, Frederick J. Naile, M. W. Sanders, 

and S. W. Terry. 
Acting Ensigns, William Wardrop, Henry 

Baker. J. M. Alden, and D. Pratt Mxnix. 
Acting Master's Mates, 11. S. Howell, Harry 

Woodruff, David V. Porter, and Charles 

H. Sedgewick. 
Engineers : Acting Chief, George W. Walk- 
er; Acting First Assistant, 0. G. Ritchie; 

Acting Third Assistants, John C. Barr 

and William B. Ritchie. 
Gunner, John E. Hall. 
Acting Carpenter, Noah Dean. 

lEON-CL.lD STE.1.MEE ESSEX. 

Commander, Robert Townsend. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Allen. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Charles W. 
Slamm. 

Acting Masters, John C. Parker and E. 
Reese. 

Acting Ensign, Spencer Johnson. 

Acting Master's Mates, James H. Berry and 
Charles M. Fuller. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Joseph K. Heap ; 
Acting First Assistant, Joseph L. Hillard ; 
Acting Second Assistants, Ed. P. Sprague 
and Charles H. Burt ; Acting Third As- 
sistants, Henry Wood and Nicholas 
Saner. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMER EASTPOET. 

Lieutenant-Commander, S. L. Phelps. 



Acling Assistant Surgeon, Martin L. Ger- 
ould. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, William H. 
Gilman. 

Acting Ensigns, S. Poole, R. M. Williams, 
and E. H. Quilding. 

Acting Master's Slates, Ralph A. Day, R. 
A. Treat, and Benjamin W. Herr. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Henry Hartwig ; 
Acting First Assistants, Thomas F. Acker- 
man and John S. Moore ; Acting Second 
Assistant, George N. Heizel ; Acting 
Third Assistants, William T. Baxter and 
James F. Liddell. 

Acting Gunner, John F. Riblet. 

Acting Carpenter, James Rouse. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMEE LAEjlYETTE. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James P. Foster. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Edward Mor- 
gan. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, D. H. Haydeu. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, James P. 
Kelly. 

Acting Ensigns, John L. Bryant, Frederick 
G. Sampson, and James L. Moran. 

Acting Master's Mates, Paul Morgan, Wil- 
liam P. Higbee, Sturgis 0. Lovell, S. R. 
Winram, and Charles H. Slocum. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Robert Tate ; Act- 
ing First Assistant, James Wilkius ; Act- 
ing Second Assistant, John W. PauU ; 
Acting Third Assistants, E. B. Hill and 
Max Pratt. 

Acting Gunner, George Price. 

Acting Carpenter, J. W. Lister. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMEE BENTON. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James A. Greer. 
Assistant Surgeon, N. L. Bates. 



342 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. G. Lown- 
des. 

Acting Masters, E. C. Breman, J. F. Reed, 
and N. B. Willetts. "^ 

Acting Ensigns, William J. Lees, Henry S. 
O'Grady, and Peyton H. Randolph. 

Acting Masters' Mates, William Kisuer and 
Hiram Simonton. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Job V. Starr ; 
Acting First Assistant, Hector W. Fair- 
foul; Acting Second Assistants, Oliver 
Bray and Alonzo A. Jenks ; Acting Tiiird 
Assistant, Benjamin Farmer. 

Acting Carpenter, Richard Rockford. 

IBON-OLAD STEAMER LOCISVILLB. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Elias K. Owen. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Fayette Clapp. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, JD. L. Ruth. 

Acting Ensigns, Henry A. Coffenberry, 
Charles Nelson, Henry Harkins, George 
V. Mead, Robert H. Longlands, Frank 
Bates, and John T. Blackford. 

Acting Master's Mates, Jacob J. Drew, 
Charles Smith, Jr., and C. S. Soanlan. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, James B. Fulton ; 
Acting First Assistant, J. J. Hardy ; Act- 
ing Second Assistant, C. W. Reynolds; 
Acting Third Assistant, Charles F. Degel- 
man. 

Acting Gunner, William Shields. 

Acting Carpenter, D. H. Curry. 

lEON-ClAD STEAMEE CARONDELET. 

Lieutenant-Commander, J. C. Mitchell. 

Assistant Surgeon, D. R. B.j.nnon. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. G. Worden. 

Acting Ensigns, Oliver iJonaldson, Scott D. 
Jorden, E. W. Miller, and T. A. Quinn. 

Acting Master's Mates, Lauren W. Hastings 
and W. H. H. DeGroot. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Ch.arles H. Calvin; 

Acting First Assistant, George H. Atkin- 
son ; Acling Second Assistants, M. Nor- 
ton and Walter B. Barton ; Acting Third 
Assistant, John McWilliams 

Acting Carpenter, George W. Kenney. 

lEON-CLAD STEAMEE, CHOCTAW. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Francis M. Ram- 
say. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, William N. 
Whitehouse. 

Acting Master, William A. Griswold. 

Acting Ensigns, Ezra Beaman, William C. 
Bennett, Arohy S. Palmer, and Lewis R. 
Hamersly. 

Acting Master's Mates, Townsend Hopkins 
and Henry Marsh. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, N. P. Baldwin 
Acting First Assistant, C. E. Arbuthnot 
Acting Second Assistant, Joseph Blake 



Acting Third Assistants, S.C. Babbitt and 

E, H. Austin. 
Acting Gunner, Reuben Applegate. 
Acting Carpenter, John A. Stewart. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMER OSAGE. 

Lieutenant-Commander, T. 0. Selfridge. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, P. P. Gilmartin. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, George W. 
Dougherty. 

Acting Ensigns, W. S. Peas, George Dunn, 
John L. Miokle, and R. K. Hubbell. 

Acting Master's Mates, M. J. Durney, J. C. 
Winslow, and Byron C. Wheeler. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, Thomas Doughty; 
Acting First Assistant, George H. Hobbs; 
Acting Second Assistants, William Gal- 
breath and A. F. Fox. 

STEAMER OmCHITA. 

Lieutenant-Commander, Byron Wilson 

Acting Ensign, Eugene Zimmerman. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Joseph R. 
Meeker. 

Acting Ensign, Perry C. Wright. 

Acting Master's Mates, J. W. Lithurbury, 
Elbert P. Marshall, and Allen W. V/idup. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Thomas Hebron ; 

Acting First Assistant, George W. Taylor ; 
Acting Second Assistant, George T. Wil- 
son ; Acting Third Assistant, Thomas 
Reed. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMER LEXINGTON. 

Lieutenant, George M. Bache. 

Aoiing Assistant Surgeon, H. M. Mixer. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Thomas C. 
Doane. 

Acting Ensigns, Henry Booby, Joseph Q. 
Migler, and C. C. Brigga. 

Acting Master's Mates, Daniel "Winget, 
Howard Hale, and Ezra McDunn. 

Engineers: Acting Chief, W. H. Meredith; 
Acting First Assistant, A. L. Mann ; Act- 
ing Second Assistant, Reuben Story; Act- 
ing Third Assistants, Jacob Vitinger and 
William T. Neel. 

Ac'.ing Gunner, Louis Frederick. 

Acting Carpenter, Richard Carroll. 

IRON-CLAD STEAMER CHILLIOOTHE. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, J. P. Cou- 
thouy. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, G. C. Osgood. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Hatha- 
way. 

Acting Master, W. T. Power. 

Acting Ensigns, W. Muirs, J. C. Hall, and 
Horace A. Hannon. 

Acting Master's Mates, James Harrington 
and Charles S. Wells. 



MISSISSIPPI SQUADRON. 



343 



Engineers : Acting Chief, A. W. Hardy ; 
Acting First Assistant, Charles Trotter ; 
Acting Second Assistant, John W. Hy- 
men ; Acting Third Assistants, J. W. 
Terrell and Anthony Lane. " 

Acting Gunner, W. E. Keyes. 

Acting Carpenter, J. H. Fink. 

lEON-OLAD BTBAMEK PITTSBTTRO. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, W. K. Hoel. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, F. M. Follett. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, C. H. Gould. 

Acting Mister, George W. Rogers. 

Acting Ensigns, Charles N. Hall, James 
Ovatt, Freeman Vincent, and George W. 
Garlick. 

Acting Master's Mates, Henry N. Wells, 
Jolm Scott, and Charles B. Jones. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, S. B. Goble ; Act- 
ing First Assistant, Eli R. Pary ; Acting 
Second Assistants, William H. Mitchell 
and Julius Elliter. 

Acting Gunner, Frank C. Green. 

Acting Carpenter, Charles Poplar. 

IKON-OIAD STEAMER MOUND OUT. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, A. R. Lang- 
thorn. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Rice. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, B. J. Donahue. 

Acting Master, F. T. Coleman. 

Acting Ensigns, S. B. Coleman, D. Steb- 
bius, and W. H. Decker. 

Acting Master's Mate, Richard T. Lamport. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, Edward Merri- 
man ; Acting First Assistant, E. R. Clem- 
ens; Acting Second Assistant, John M. 
Hartnett; Acting Third Assistants, George 
L. Baker and Richard Carter. 

Acting Gunner, Thomas H. Green. 

Acting Carpenter, Jerome Burns. 



lEON-OLAD STEAMER NEOSHO. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Samuel How- 
ard. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, M. A. Miller. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, W. H. Byrn, 

Acting Ensigns, E. F. Brooks, James 
Downs, E. P. Bragg, and R. Howden. 

Acting Master's Mates, H. J. Kiskaden, 
Alexander Semple, and Henry B. Purdy. 

Engineers : Acting Chief, William Mills ; 
Acting First Assistant, W. C. Sanford; 
Acting Second Assistant, J. L. Miles; 
Acting Third Assistants, J. F. Hum- 
phreys and M. C Noland. 

Acting Gunner, W. T. Devlan. 

Acting Carpenter, J. 0. Baker. 

STEAMER PORT HINDMAN, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, John Pearce. 
Acting Assistant Paymaster, Alfred B. 

Adams. 
Acting Ensigns, Francis A. Oliver, CharleB 

Marsden, and Frederick H. Wait. 
Acting Master's Mates, B. G. Van Dyke, S. 

N. Barker, C. P. A. McCord, and H. 

Shoemaker. 
Engineers : Acting First Assistant, Thomas 

Girty ; Acting Second Assistant, D. B. 

Cox ; Acting Third Assistants, Eli Powell 

and Reuben Socum. 

STEAMER CRICKET. 

Acting Master, Henry H. Gorringe. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon, H. A. Bodman. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, W. M. Chester. 

Acting Ensigns, D. P. Slattery, W. H. Read, 
and J. McLeans. 

Acting Master's Mate, John Wilson. 

Engineers : Acting First Assistant, Benja- 
min Hand; Acting Second Assistants, 
David Chillias, Charles P. Parks, and T. 
M. Jenks. 



LIST OF OFFICERS ATTACHED TO STEAMER KEARSARGE AT THE TIME OF 
TEE DESTRUCTION OF THE REBEL STEAMER ALABAMA. 



Captain, John A. Winslow. 

Lieutenant-Commander, James S. Thorn- 
ton. 

Surgeon, John M. Browne. 

Paymaster, J. Adams Smith. 

Master, David H. Sumner. 

Acting Masters, James R. Wheeler and 
Eben M. Stoddard. 

Chief Engineer, William H. Cushman. 

Second Assistant Engineer, William H. Bad- 
lam. 



Third Assistant Engineers, Frederick L. 

Miller, Henry MoConnell, and Sidney L. 

Smith. 
Midshipman, Edward E. Preble. 
Master's Mates, Charles H. Danforth, Ezra 

Bartlett, and WiUiam H. Teaton. 
Captain's Clerk, Seth E. Hartwell. 
Paymaster's Clerk, Daniel B. Sargent. 
Gunner, Franklin A. Graham. 
Boatswain, James C. Walton. 



INDEX- TO NAMES OF OFFICERS 

WHOSE RECORDS ARE GITEN, 



Abbot, 0. W Paymaster 

Abbott, John F Commander 

Abbott, Walter Lt. Commander. 

Adams, H. A., Jr Commander 

Adams, N. H Surgeon 

Albert, John J Chief Engineer., 

Alden, James Commodore 

Allen, R. W Paymaster 



PAQE. 

....213 
...132 
...170 
...118 
....208 
,...235 
... 36 
,.223 



Allen, W. N. Lt. Oommander....l43 

Almy, J.J Captain 58 

Ames, S. D Lt. Commander... ..154: 

Ammen, Daniel Captain 68 

Armentrout, G. W Lt. Commander ....187 

Armstrong, James F Captain 74 

Arnold, H. N. T Commander 93 

Auliek, JohnH Commodore 42 

Baboock, C. A Lt. Commander 137 

Bache, A. D Paymaster 224 

Bache, G-. M Lt. Commander... ..158 

Badger, 0. C Commander 104 

Bailey, Theodoras Rear Admiral 25 

Baker, Charles H Chief Engineer 235 

Baker, F. H Commander 126 

Baker, J. F Captain M. C 248 

Baker, S. H Lt. Commander... ..187 

Baloh, G. B Captain 69 

Baldwin, Augustus S.... Captain 85 

Baldwin, C. H Captain 82 

Barclay, C. J. Lt. Commander 181 

Barker, A. S Lt. Commander 167 

Barrett, E Commander 97 

Bartlett, H. A Captain M. C 249 

Bartlett, John R Lt. Commander 168 

Bartleman, R. M Chief Engineer 235 

Batcheller, 0. A. Lt. Commander 168 

Bates, N.L Surgeon 205 

Batione, D. B Paymaster 

Beale, J Surgeon 

Beaman, G. W Paymaster , 

Beardslee, L. A Commander .... 

Beardsley, G. S Surgeon. 

Beaumont, J. C... Commander 

Belknap, G. E .....Commander 

Bell, Charles H Rear Admiral.. 

Benham, A. E. K Commander.... 

Berrien, John M Commodore.... 

Billings, L. G Paymaster 

Bishop, A. MoC Paymaster., 



,.224 
,.192 
..220 
.132 
.207 
..133 
,.113 
. 23 
..126 
,. 65 
..222 
"219 

Bishop, H. J Lieutenant M. C...251 

Bissell, S. B Commodore 37 

Blake, Charles E Lt. Commander 167 

Blake, P. B Lt. Commander... ..144 

Blake, George S Commodore 49 

Blake, H. C , Commander. 97 



,.202 
.. 43 
..206 
.. 32- 
,.212 
,. 85 
,. 53 
.100 
..211 



Bloodgood, D Surgeon 

Boarman, Charles ..Commodore.. 

Bogert, E. S Surgeon 

Boggs, Charles S Commodore. 

Eoggs, W. B Paymaster... 

Bowers, Edw. C Captain 

Boyle, J. J Commodore . 

Bradford, J. M Commander.. 

Bradford, J. Paymaster. .. 

Bradford, R. P Lt. Commander 140 

Bradley, Michael Surgeon 205 

Braine, S. L , Commander 113 

Brasher, Thomas M Captain 86 

Breese, K. R Commander 110 

Breese, Samuel L .Rear Admiral 21 

Breese, S. L Commander... 125 

Breese, James D. B Pirst Lieut. M. C...255 

Bridgeman, William R..Lt. Commander 166 

Bright, Q. S Chief Engineer 239 

Brooks, W. B Chief Engineer... ..234 

Broome, J. L Major M. C 244 

Brewer, E. T Lt. Commander 161 

Brown, A. D Lt. Commander 176 

Brown, P. S Lt. Commander 155 

Brown, George Commander. 118 

Brown, W. R Pirst Lieut. M. C..250 

Browne, J. M Surgeon 199 

Browne, S. T Paymaster 263 

Brownell, Thomas Captain 88 

Bruce, Henry Commodore 47 

Bryant, Nathaniel C Commander 132 

Bryson, A Captain 72 

Buekner, W. P Commander.. ...%. ..134 

BuUus, Oscar Commodore 49 

Bulkley, J. H Paymaster 226 

Bunco, P. M Lt. Commander.....l45 

Burbank, C. H ....Surgeon 204 

Burtia, A Paymaster 220 

Butler, George Captain M. C 246 

Caldwell, A, G Lt. Commander.. ..186 

Caldwell, C. H. B Captain 78 

Carpender, Edw. W Commodore 45 

Carpenter, C. C Commander 130 

Carpenter, J. N Paymaster 214 

Carr, Overton Captain 83 

Carter, John C Commodore 65 

Carter, S. P Commander 95 

Case, A. L Commodore 39 

Casey, S. Jr Lt. Commander. ...157 

Cash, J. C Major M. C 241 

Cassell, D. B Lt. Commander.. ..174 

Caswell, T. T Paymaster 218 

Chadwiok, P. B Lt. Commander... .186 

Champlin, Stephen Commodore 44 



(345) 



346 



INDEX, 



HAUI!. BANE. PAGE. 

Chandler, B Commander 110 

Channcey, John S Commodore 46 

Chester, C. M Lt. Comma,nder 181 

Chew, E. S Lt. Commander 170 

Cilley, Crreenleaf. Commander 185 

Clark, A. J Paymaster.., 218 

Clark, Charles B Lt. Commander.. ,.181 

Clark, J. H Surgeon 208 

, Clark, L , Lt. Commander.. ..179 

Clark, R. H Paymaster 213 

Clarke, F Paymaster 224 

Clary, A. Gr Captain 75 

Cleborne, C. J.... Surgeon 204 

Clitz, J. M. B Captain 72 

Cochrane, fieorge Paymaster. 218 

Cochrane, H. C 1st Lt. M. C 254 

Coffin, George W Lt. Commander. ...174 

Coghlan, J. B Lt. Commander.. ..178 

Colhoun, B. K Captain 81 

Colhoun, John Commodore 51 

Collier, G. W.. Captain M. C 246 

Collins, N Captain 64 

CoUum, R. S 1st Lt. M.C 251 

Colvoooresses, G. M Captain 88 

Cooke, A, P Lt. Commander.. ..141 

Cook, E. A , Lt. Commander.. ..180 

Cooper, G.H Captain 77 

Cooper, P. H Lt. Commander.. ..175 

Corbin, T. G Captain 73 

Corrie, P. H 1st Lt. M. C 250 

Cosby, F Paymaster 217 

Cotton, C. S Lt. Conunander....l67 

Cones, S. F Surgeon 198 

Crabbe, Thomas Bear Admiral 22 

Craven, Charles H Lt. Commander.. ..177 

CraTen, T. T Rear Admiral 17 

Creighton, J. B Captain 81 

Cromwell, B. J Lt. Commander....l59 

Crosby, P Captain 80 

Grossman, A. F....; Lt. Commander.. ..140 

Crowningshield, A. S ....Lt. Commander... 177 

Cunningham, J. S Paymaster. 213 

Cushing, William B Lt. Commander... .146 

Cushing, M. B Paymaster 225 

Cushman, Charle? H Commander 117 

Cutter, George F Paymaster 210 

Dade, F. C Chief Engineer 232 

Dahlgren, J. A Rear Admiral 14 

Dallas, F. G. Commander 136 

Dana, William H Commander 131 

Dana, W. S Lt. Commander.. ..180 

Danby, Robert Chief Engineer 229 

Davenport, F. 0..„ Lt. Commander.. ..160 

Davenport, H. K Captain 78 

Davis,. 0. H Bear Admiral 13 

Davis, C. H Lt. Commander;.. .189 

Davis, George L Paymaster 214 

Davis, G. T Lt. Commander...,183 

Davis, J. L Commander 105 

Dawson, L. L Captain M. C 245 

Day, B.F Lt. Commander.... 165 

Dean, R. C „ Surgeon 201 

Decatur, Stephen Captain 84 

De Camp, John Commodore 58 

De Krafft, J. C.P Commander 103 

De Luce, E. S Chief Engineer 230 

Denby, E. B Surgeon 200 

Denniston, H, M Paymaster 216 



Dewey, G Lt. Commander... .148 

Dichman, E. J Lt. Commander.. ..175 

Dickens, F. W Lt. Cdmmaiider....l89 

Donaldson, E Captain 66 

Doran, E. C Paymaster 211 

Dornin, T. A Commodore 46 

Drake, A.J ..Commander 133 

Duer, B. K Lt. Commander.. ..163 

Dungan, J. S Surgeon 198 

Dungan, W. W Chief Engineer 237 

Dunn, E. T Paymaster 209 

Duvall, M Surgeon 195 

Dyer, N. M Lt. Commander....l84 

Eagle, Henry Commodore 48 

Eastman, Thos. E Lt. Commander.. ..142 

Bldridge, C. H Paymaster 215 

Eldridge, J. C Paymaster 211 

EUery, Frank Commodore 44 

Ellison, F. B Commodore 50 

Emery, C. J. Paymaster 213 

Emmons, G. F Commodore 49 

EnglishjB Commander 99 

Erben, H. Jr Commander 129 

Evans, R. D Lt. Commander.. ..174 

Eversfield, C Surgeon 196 

Fagan, L.E ,lstLt. M. C 253 

Fairfax, D. M. N Captain 71 

Farquhar, N. H Lt. Commander.. ..151 

Farragnt, D. G..._ Admiral 7 

Febiger, J. C Captain 79 

Fendall, P. R Capt. M. C 245 

Field, T. Y Major M. C ,243 

Fillebrown, T. S Commander 108 

Fitch, Le Roy Lt. Commander... ..141 

Fithian, B Chief Engineer 23^ 

Fitzhugh, Wm. E Commander 117 

Fletcher, M Chief Engineer 231 

Foltz, J. M Surgeon 190 

Folger, W. M Lt. Commander.. ..188 

Forney, James Captain M. C 247 

Foster, Edw Paymaster 216 

Prailey, J. M Captain 59 

Frailey, Leonard Paymaster 225 

Franklin, C. L Lt. Commander... .149 

Franklin, S. R Commander 121 

French, L. P 1st Lt. M. C 252 

Fulton, James.. Paymaster 214 

Fyffe, Jos. P Commander 127 

Gamble, Wm.M Commander 136 

Gardner, Wm. H Commodore 46 

Garvin, B. F Chief Engineer 229 

Gherardi, B ..Commander 112 

Gibbs, B. F Surgeon 202 

Gibson, Alex .Captain 83 

Gibson, J. J Surgeon 203 

Gibson, Wm Commander 134 

Gibson, A. L Surgeon 200 

Gilchrist, B Surgeon 190 

Gillett, S. P Lt. Commander.. ..153 

Gillis, Jas. H Commander 116 

Gillis, John P Commodore 66 

Gillman, A. H Paymaster 216 

Giraud, J. S Paymaster 226 

Glass, Henry Lt. Commander 174 

Glasson, Jno. J Commodore 66 

Glendy Wm. M Commodore 49 



INDEX. 



347 



NASIE. EINE. FAOB. 

GUdden, G. D. B Lt. Commander. ...183 

Glissou, 0. S Commodore 30 

Glynnj James jvCommodore.. 46 

Goodrich, Caspar F Lt. Commander.... 186 

GodoD, S. W Bear Admiral 15 

GoUlsborough, L. M Rear Admiral 11 

Goldsborough, J. B Commodore 37 

Goldaborough, W Paymaster 221 

Gorgas, A. C Surgeon 201 

Gorringe, H. H Lt. Commander 185 

Graham, G. R Major M. C 243 

Graham, Jos. D Lt. Commander 166 

Graham, John H Commodore 43 

Grafton, E. C Commander 122 

Green, Cbas Commodore 56 

Green, F. M Lt. Commander 184 

Green, J. F Commodore 38 

Green, Nathl Lt. Commander.. ..143 

Greene, S. I) Lt. Commander.. ..151 

Greene, T. P Commodore 38 

Greer, J. A Commander. 115 

Gridley, Chas. V Lt. Commander 182 

Grier, W Surgeon 192 

Grimes, J. H Captain M. C 248 

Guest, John Captain 71 

Guild, Chas. F Paymaster 222 

Guliok, J. S Paymaster 212 

Gunnell, F. M Surgeon 197 

Haggerty, F. S Captain 88 

Hamilton, Jas. F Paymaster 222 

Handy, Robert iCojnmodore 66 

Harlan, B Surgeon 191 

Harmony, D. B Commander 114 

Harrell, A. D Captain 89 

Harrington, P. F Lt. Commander 179 

Harris, J. Jr Lt. Commander 173 

Harris, J. G Paymaster 211 

Harris T. C Commander 104 

Harrison, N. B Captain 79 

Harwood, A. H Rear Admiral 25 

Hassler, C. W Paymaster 217 

Haswell, G. K Lt. Commander 172 

Hatfield, C Lt. Commander 142 

Haxtun, M Commander 122 

Haycock, S. B 1st Lt. M. C 254 

Haywood, G. W Lt. Commander 159 

Hebb, CD Captain M. C 244 

Heiskell, H. M Paymaster 210 

Hendee, George E Paymaster 225 

Henderson A Surgeon 194 

Henderson, Alex Chief Engineer 232 

Hendrickson, W. W Lt. Commander.. ..177 

Henry, E. W Commander 137 

Heywood, C Captain M. 245 

Hibbert, S. D Chief Engineer 232 

Higbce, J. H Captain M. C 247 

Higginson, F. J Lt. Commander.. ..164 

Hiland, Thomas Surgeon 209 

Hinman, F. H Paymaster 221 

Hitchcock, R. B Commodore 53 

Hoebling, A. A Surgeon 208 

Hoff, Henry K Rear Admiral 27 

HofF, Wm. B Lt. Commander.. ..179 

Hooker, E Lt. Commander.. ..184 

Hopkins, Alfred Lt. Commander.. ..138 

Hopkins, W. E Commander 93 

Herd, W. T Surgeon 200 

Horwitz, P. J Surgeon 197 



Houston, G. P Captain M. C 248 

Howell, John A Lt. Commander. ...148 

Howell, J. C Captain 67 

Howison, H. L Lt. Commander. ...149 

Hoy, Jas Paymaster 219 

Hudson, A Surgeon 205 

Hughes, A. K Captain 81 

Hull, Jos. B Commodore 45 

Hunt, T. A. Commodore 54 

Hunt, W. H Chief Engineer 237 

Hunter, Chas Captain 86 

Huntington, C. L Lt. Commander.... 163 

Huntington, R.W Captain M. C 248 

Inch, P Chief Engineer 239 

Inman, Wm Commodore 44 

Irving, W Paymaster 215 

Irwin, John Commander 115 

Isherwood, B. F Chief Engineer 227 

Jackson, C, C, Paymaster 213 

Jackson, C. H Commodore 49 

Jackson, S Surgeon 193 

Jamesson, Wm Commodore 43 

Jarvis, Jos. B Commodore 44 

Jeffers, W. N Comm.ander 94 

Jenkins, T. A Commodore 33 

Jewell, T. F Lt. Commander.. ..187 

Johnson, A, W Commander 124 

Johnson, G. B Chief Engineer.... 234 

Johnson, Henry L Lt. Commander.. ..166 

Johnson, J Chief Engineer 239 

Johnson, M. L Lt. Commander.. ..173 

Johnson, P. C, Jr Commander 124 

Johnson, W. B. Jr Surgeon 201 

Jones, J. H Lt. Colonel M. C...242 

Jones, T.J Chief Eogineer 237 

Jouett, James E Commander 108 

Kane, T. F Lt. Coramanrler....l51 

Kautz, A Lt. Ciim'.aaii'ler....l60 

Kellogg, A. G Lt. Commander.. ..178 

Kellogg, E. N Lt. CuuiUiaiider....l70 

Kellogg, M Chief Eujiaeer 236 

KempfT, L ....Lt. Cuiniuarider....l63 

Kennedy, C. W Lt. Cc!mmandcr....lS6 

Kennedy, S. D Surgeon 206 

Kennett, J. C Lt. CHmm.i.uaer....l88 

Kenny, A. J P.aymasler 219 

Kidder, B. H Surgeon 208 

Kiersted, A. J Cliief Enginetr....236 

Kilty, Aug. H Commudore 51 

Kimball, J. B Chief Engineer 234 

Kimberly, L. A Comm.mder Ill 

Kindleberger, D Surgeon 203 

King, J. W Chief Eugiofter 228 

King, W. W Surgeon 202 

Kintzing,M. B Colonel M. C 242 

Kirkland, Wm. A Corauiaoder 130 

Kitchen, J. S Surgeon 20O 

Knight, J. S Suvgt-on 207 

Knox, Samuel B CiipLain 87 

Kutz, G. F Chief Engineer. ...236 

Ijamberton, B. P Lt. Cnmmnnder....l89 

Lamdin, W. J Cliief Engineer 234 

Lanier, Edmund Captain 87 

Lanman, Joseph Rear Admiial 18 

Lansdalo, P Surgeon 196 



348 



INDEX. 



HAMB. RISK. TAGE. 

Lardner, Jas, L Rear Admiral 26 

Latimer, Wm. K Commodore 43 

Law, K. L Commander 120 

Lawton, A Chief Engineer 230 

Lawton, E Chief Engineer 228 

Leaoh, T. "IV Surgeon 202 

Lee, S. P Commodore 29 

LeBoy, W. E Captain 62 

Lewis, James Major M. 244 

Lewis, R. P. R Commander 123 

Lisle, R.P Paymaster 223 

Livingston, J. W Commodore 62 

Lockwood, Samuel Commodore 60 

Long, J. H Chief Engineer 239 

Looker, T. H Paymaster 212 

Loring, C. H Chief Engineer 231 

Low, W. W Commander 101 

LowlDor, W Surgeon 197 

Lowndes, Charles Commodore 47 

Lowry, Francis Captain 87 

Lowry, H. B Captain M. C 249 

Lowry, R. B Commander 100 

Luce, S. B Commander 106 

Ludlow, N Lt. Commander ISO 

Lull, E. P Lt. Commander 139 

Lynch, D Captain 86 

Lyon, a. A Paymaster 220 

Maccoun, R T Surgeon 196 

Maclay, William W Lt. Commander 175 

Macomb, D. B Chief Engineer.,. ...232 

Macomb, W. H Captain 61 

Madigan, John Commander 97 

Maddox,W. A. T Captain M.C 241 

Magaw, Samuel Commander 135 

Mahan, A. T Commander 160 

Manley, H. D. H Lt. Commander.. ..155 

MarchanJ, J. B Commodore 34 

Maroy, W. G Piiymaster 212 

Marin, M.C Captain 88 

Martin, Charles Surgeon 197 

Martin, G. R Paymaster 221 

Marston, John Commodore 47 

Marvin, Joseph D Lt. Commander 153 

Master, T. C Paymaster 217 

Mathews, E. Lt. Commander 139 

Mathews, B. S Surgeon 207 

Maulsby, G , Surgeon 192 

May, E Paymaster 216 

Mayo, H. Surgeon 196 

Mayo, W, K Commander 107 

MoCalla, B. H Lt. Commander 1S6 

MoCann, William P Commander 128 

McCarty, S. A Lt. Commander 165 

McCaulcy, E. Y Commander 121 

McCawloy, C. G Lt. Colonel M. C.,.243 

McClellan, J Surgeon 193 

MoCook, R. S Lt. Commander.. ..162 

McCormick, A. H Lt. Commander,. ..166 

MeCrea, B. P Commander 129 

McDonough, C. S Captain 90 

MoDougal, 0. J Lt. Commander 1 13 

McDoug.al. D. D Commodore 42 

MoElmcll, J Chief Engineer 238 

McFjrland, John Lt. Commander.. ..104 

MoGlensey, John P Lt. Commander.. ..161 

McGregor, Charles Lt. Commander.. ..173 

McKean, W. B Captain M. C 249 

McKiustry, J. P Commodore 67 



McMaster, James Surgeon 203 

MoNair, A. R Lt. Commander. ,..155 

McNair, F. V Lt. Conlmander....l46 

Mead, G. L Paymaster. 226 

Meade, H. M Paymaster 223 

Meade, R. L First Lieut. M. C..251 

Meade, R.W Captain 82 

Meade, R. W., Jr Commander 130 

Meeker, B. P First Lieut. M. C... 253 

Merriman, E. C Lt. Commander.. ..161 

Messersmith, J. S Surgeon 194 

Middleton, B Commodore 41 

Miller, J. D Surgeon 192 

Miller, Joseph N Lt. Commander 138 

Miller, M Lt. Commander 109 

Mitchell, A. N Lt. Commander 164 

Mitchell, William Commander 134 

Moeller, B. J Captain 84 

Montgomery, J. B Rear Admiral 22 

Moore, J. W, Chief Engineer 235 

Morris, P Lt. Commander.. ..182 

Morris, G. U Commander Ill 

Muldaur, A. W Lt. Coromaniler....lS5 

MuU.an, D. W Lt. Commiiiidor....l83 

Mullan, H. E Lt. Commander.. ..160 

Mullany, J. R. M Captain 63 

Munroe, F Captain M. C 247 

Murray, A Captain 65 

Murray, J. D Paymaster 214 

Murray, W. B First Lieut. M. C..255 

Muse, William S First Lieut. M. C..264 

Naile, F. J Lt. Commander 109 

Nelson, H. C Surgeon 204 

Newell, H Chief Engineer 230 

Nichols, B. T Captain 08 

Nichols, S. W Lt. Commander 163 

Nicholson, A. S Major M. C 241 

Nicholson, J. W. A Captain 73 

Nicholson, S Commander 92 

Nicholson, Wm. C Commodnre 46 

Niles, Marston Lt. Commander 176 

Nokes, N. L 1st Lt. M. C 251 

Norton, C. S Lt. Commander 140 

Oberly, A. S Surgeon... 207 

O'Kane, James Lt. Commander 153 

O'Niel, Charles Lt. Commander 185 

Owen, E. K Commander 115 

P.almer,J.C Surgeon 191 

Parker, F Pay